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Full text of "Proceedings of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association: Annual Meeting"

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I 



THE OIFX OF 




7T5 
I 

.037 



PROCEEDINOS 



OF THI 



OHIO STATE 




HARMACEUTICAL ilSSOCIATION 




AT ITS 



NINTH ANN-UAL MEETING. 



HELD IN 



Akron. June 8th, 9th and IOth, 1887, 



TOeBTHBR WITH THE 



Constitution, By-Laws, and List of Members. 



-^•►■ 



CLEVELAND, OHIO: 

LEADER PRINTINQ OOMPANT, 146 SUPERIOR STREET. 

1887. 



NOTICE. 



Those wishing full sets of the Proceedings can obtain them from 
the Secretary at the following rates : 

Proceedings of 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882 and 1883, - $0 75 

Proceeding of 1884, . . . - - 50 

Proceedings of 1885, ..... 50 

Proceedings of* 1886, ..... 50 

Proceedings of 1887, ..... 50 

Or the nine volumes for - - - • 2 75 

• 

The next meeting of this Association will be held in Columbus, 
June i2th, 1888. 






LIST OF OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION. 

Presidents. 

J. F. Judge, M. D., - Cinfcinnati, 1879-80 

J. W. Dietrich, - - Dayton, 1880-81 

I. N. Reed, - Toledo. - - - • - 1881-82 

D. C. Peters, M.D.. - - Zanesville. 1882-83 

S. S. West, - • Cleveland, 1883-84 

John Weyer, - - Cinc'nn^ti, 1884-85 

Wm. M. Melville, Sandusky, . . . . ^ 1885-86 

Virgil Coblentz, - Springfield, 1886-87 

S. E. Allen, - - - Akrm, 1887-88 

First Vice Presidents. 

T. N. McCoy, .... Kenton, 1879-80 

T. F. Judge, M.D , Cincinnati, 1880-81 

T. L. A. Greve, - - Cincinnati, • - • - - 1881-82 

E. A. Schellentrager, Cleveland, 1882-83 

foHN Weyer, - - Cincinnati, - - *- - - 1883-84 

W. J. Martin, - - Cincinnati, 1884-85 

Charles Ludlow, - - Springfield, 1885-86 

C N. Nye, - - - Canton, 1886-87 

M. D. Fulton, - - Bucyrus, 1887-88 

Seoond Vice Presidents. 

M. L. Mooney, - - - Cardington, 1879-80 

H. C. Gaylord, - - Cleveland, ..... 1880-81 

J. N. McCoy, - Kenton, 1881-82 

F. Harrington, - - - Logan, 1882-83 

E. M. Hatton, - - Zanesville, 1883-84 

M. D. Fulton, - Bucyrus, - .... 1884-85 

D. D. Benedict, M. D , • Norwalk, 1885-86 

M. D. Fulton, - - • Bucyrus. _ 1886^87 

Geo. W. Voss, - Cincinnati, 1887-88 

Permanent Secretary. 

Lewis C. Hopp, - - - Cleveland, 1879-88 

Permanent Treasurer. 

Chas. Huston, - - - Columbus, 1879-88 

Assistant Secretaries. 

E. A. Schellentrager, • - Cleveland, - - - • - 1882-83 
W. J. Martin, - - - Cincinnati, - - - - 1883-84 

W. M. Melville, - - - Sandusky, 1884-85 

Charles Ludlow, - - Springfield, - - - - 1885-86 

C. T. Inman, - - - - Akron, - - ... 1886-87 

H. C. Cook, - - Columbus, . . 1887-88 



190977 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

1887-88. 



S. £. Allen, - 

M. D. Fulton, 

G. W. Voss, - 

Lewis C. Hopp, 

Chas. Huston, 

Theo. Troupe, 
C. T. In man, 
C. P. Rendigs, 



President. 



First Vice President. 



Second Vice President. 



Permanent Secretary. 



Permanent Treasurer. 



Executive Committe. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Committee on Trade Interests. 



C. B. Johnson, 
M. H. McClain, 
W. J. Walding, 

Joseph Feil, 

W. SiMONSON, 

J. I. Beck, 

G. L. Hechler, 
J. A. Nipgen, 
Chas. Huston, 
J. H. Wahmhoff, 
W. J. Martin, 

Lewis C. Hopp, 

E. Goodman, 
H. C. Cook, 

F. T. Bower, 

J. C. BOLGER, 



Committee on Papers and Queries. 



Committee> on Pharmacy Laws. 



Committee on Unofficinal Formulae. 



Akron. 

• Bucyrtts. 

Cincinnati. 

Cleveland. 

Columbus. 

Springfield. 

Akron. 

Cincinnati. 



Middletown. 
Gallon. 
Toledo. 

Cleveland. 

Cincinnati. 

Springfield. 

Cleveland. 
Chillicothe. 

Columbus. 
- Delphos. 

Cincinnati. 

Cleveland. 

Cincinnati. 

Columbus. 

Toledo. 

Salem. 



Committee on Adulteration and Sophistications. 



Joseph Feil, 
J. U. Lloyd, 
F. T. Bower, 



Cleveland. 

Cincinnati. 

Toledo. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

Reporter on Progress of Pharmacy. 



S. W. McKeown, 



Youngstown. 



Committee on Bevision of the Pharmacopoeia and Delegates to the General Con- 
vention for the Bevision of the Pharmacopoeia of the United States, 

To be held in Washington, D. C, on the first Wednesday of May, 1890. 

Lewis C. Hopp, ....... Cleveland. 

T. L. A. Greve, M,D., - - Cincinnati. 

Chas. Huston, ....... Columbus. 

Committee on Tax on Alcohol and Liquor License. 
J. D. Wells, ....... Cincinnati. 



G. L. Hechler, 

C. F. Hall, 

M. H. McClain, 

D. R. Arnold, 



H. C. Cook, 

C. T. P. Fennel, 

L. SOLLMANN, 

J. D. Lisle, M. D., 
C. D. Kerr, 



Committee on Exhibits. 



Cleveland. 

Voungstown. 

Galion. 

• Sandusky. 



Columbus. 

Cincinnati. 

Canton. 

Springfield. 

Gallipolis. 



committkf; on county corrkspondcnck. 



COUNTY. 


NAME. 

• 


CITV. 


COUNTY. 


NAME. 


CITY. 


Adams 


W. T. Peyton.... 


Manchester. 


Licking 


F. A. Collins,. .. 


Newark. 


Allen 


H. Bracelin 


Bluffcon. 


Logan 


F. S. Case 


Bellefontaine 


Ashland .... 


W. L. Rhoads... 


Ashland. 


Lorain 


H. J. Eady 


Elyria. 


Ashtabula . . 


A. K. Hawley . . . 


Jefferson. 


Lucas 


F. T. Bower 


Toledo. 


Athens 


£. R. Lash 


Athens. 


Madison — 


Q. Bradley 


West Jcffer- 


Auglaize.... 


J. L. Hoffman . . . 


New Bremen. 


Mahoning . . 


C. F. Hall 


son. 
Youngstown. 


Belmont .... 


J. V. Fisher 


Morristown. 


Marion 


E. C. Walt 


Marion. 


Brown 


S. J. Fitzpatrick . 
G. Doeller 


Fayetteville. 


Medina 


W. H. Albro 


'Medina., 


Butler 


Hamilton. 


Meigs 


A. W. Seebohm.. 


Pomeroy. 


Carroll.... 


L. Sollman 


Canton (StarkCo.) 


Mercer 


John Bevan 


Mendon. 


Champaign . 


J. M. Colwell.... 
F, Coblentz 


TJrbana. 


Miami 


C. W.Toby 


Troy. 


Clarke 


Springfield. 
New Richmond. 


M onroe 


J. W. McKimmie. 


Clarington. 


Clermont... 


J. C. Bleher 


Montgomery 


J. G. Spengler... 
John Alexander . . 


Dayton. 


Clinton 


G. W. Brown 


Wilmington. 


Morgon 


McConnells- 
ville. 
Mt. Gilead. 


Columbiana. 


J. C. Bolger 


Salem. 


Morrow 


J. L. Swingle.... 


Coshocton . . 


D. J. Lawson 


Warsaw. 


Muskingum. 


E. M. Hatton.. .. 


Zanesville. 


Crawford . . . 


M^. D. Fulton 


Bucyrus. 


Noble 


J.T.Dew 


Summerfield . 


Cuyahoga .. 


Lewis C. Hopp . . 


Cleveland. 


Ottawa 


E.C. Payne 


Port Clinton. 


Drake 


J. G. Stierle 


Versailles. 


Paulding . . . 


N. G. Woodward. 


Defiance.' 


Defiince.. .. 


N. a. Woodward. 


Defiance. 


Perry 


P. S. Taggart.... 


New Lexinc:- 
ton 

Circleville. 


Delaware . . . 


F. J. R. Pfiffner. , 


Delaware. 


Pickaway .. 


S. B. Evans 


Erie 


W. M. Melville.. 


Sandusky. 


Pike 


H. Adams 


Waverley. 


Fairfield.... 


E. B. White. ... 


Lancaster. 


Portage 


H. Waterman... . 


Ravenna. 


Fayette 


H. Boyer 


Washington C. H. 


Preble 


J. E. Davis 


W«st Alex, 
ander. 


Franklin .... 


W. R. Ogier 


Columbus. 


Putnam 


W. W. Kelley.... 
M. V. B. Finfrock. 


Ottawa. 


Fulton 


C. J. Nachtneb.. 
C D. Kerr 


Wauseon. 


Richland . , . 


Mansfield. 


Gallia 


Gallipolis. 


Ross 


W. H. Howson .. 


Chilhcothe. 


Geauga 


A. K. Hawley . . . 


Jefferson (Ashta- 


Sandusky .. 


E. S. Thomas .... 


Fremont. 


Green. 


Jas. McCormack. 
J. C. Hutchison . . 


Xenia. [buIaCo.) 
Cambridge. 


Scioto 

Seneca 


E. keed 


Portsmouth . 


Guernsey . . . 


E. B. Hubbard . . 


Tiffin. 


Hamilton .. 


C. P. Rendigs . . . 


Cincinnati. 


Shelby 


C. Amann 


Sidney. 


Hancock . . . 


W. H. Haven.... 


Findlay. 


Stark 


L. Sollman 


Canton. 


Hardin 


W.R.H.SuIIiger. 


Forest. 


Summit 


C. T. Inman 


Akron. 


Harrison . . . 






Trumbull . . . 


F. M. Woods 


Warren. 


Henry 

Highland . . . 


F. H. Voigt, 

R. L. Seybert 


Holgate. 


Tuscarawas. 


H. S. Francis. .. . 


Uhrichsville. 


Hillsboro. 


Union 


J. W. Field 

L. F. Gacken- 


Marysville. 


Hocking.... 


F. Harrington . . . 


Logan. 


Van Wert. . . 


Van Wert. 










heimer 




Holmes .... 


J. J. Strome 


Millersburg. 


Vinton 


A. L. Lewis 


Hamden June 


Huron 


M. Patrick 

W. F. Hale, M.D. 


Norwalk. 

Jackson. 

Steubenville. 


Warren 

Washington. 


H. Reid 


Lebanon. 


Jackson 


W. H. Styer 


Marietta. 


Jefferson — 
ICnox 


Thos. Johnson. .. 


Wayne 


J. R. Sturges 


Dal ton. 


P. A. Baker 


Mt. Vernon. 


Williams . . . 


W. M. Denman.. 


West Unity. 


Lake 


W.M.Werner... 


Painesville. 


Wood 


A. R. Champney. 


Perrysburg. 
Upper San- 


Lawrence .. 


T. C. Davis 


Ironton. 


Wyandot . . . 


J H. Von Stein.. 


dusky. 



NIENIBERS 



-OF Tni 



OHIO BOARD OF PHARMACY 

APPOINTED BT HIS BXCBLLKNCT, 

THE GOVERNOR OF OHIO. 



W. R. Ogier, - 


Columbus, 


Term expires 1892 


E. M. Hatton, 


- Zanesville, 


1891 


F. T. Bower, - 


Toledo, 


1890 


John Wkyer, 


Cincinnati, 


1889 


J. A. NiPGEN, - 


ChiUicothe, - 


1888 



OFFICEB8. 

E. M. Hatton, President. F. T. Bower, Vice President, 

J. A. NiPGEN, Secretary and Treasurer, 

The regular meetings of this board are held in — 
Cincinnati, the second Monday of January. 

Columbus, the second Monday of May. 

Cleveland, the second Monday of October. 



■wicDELEGATES.** 



I 

Delegates to the Axnerioan Fharmaoeutical Association, 
To be held in Cincinnati, O., September slfa, 6th, 7th and 8th, 1887. 

John Grether, Akron. M. V. B. Finfrock, Mansfield. 

W. M. Melville, Lima. Theo. Troupe, Springfield. 

J. C. BoLGER, Salem. 

Alternates. 
H. BOYER, Washington, C. H. T. D. McFarland, Canton. 

J. H. Guthrie, Conneaut. S. W. McKeown, Youngstown. 

M. a. Burkhardt, Dayton. 

Delegates to National "Wliolesale Druggists' Association. 
N. Ashley Lloyd, Cincinnati. . Daniel Myers, Cleveland. 

G. B. Kaufman, Colambas. E. Sachs, Dayton. 

W. J. M. Gordon, Cincinnati. 



NINTH ANNUAL MiEETINO 



OF THE 



bnio State Pharmaceutical Association. 



FIRST SESSION. Wednesday morning, June <?, 1887, 

The ninth annual meeting of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation was held at Akron, O., in the City Council Chamber, and 
called to order by President Coblentz«at 11 a.m. On motion the roll 
call and reading of the minutes were dispensed with. 

G. W. Voss, Chairman of Executive Committee, read the names of 
fifty-nine applicants for membership. 

On motion, the Executive Committe was ordered to post the names 
of the applicants in some convenient place for inspection by the 
members, and that the candidates be ballotted for at afternoon 
session. 

The Vice President, C. N. Nye, of Canton, being called to the 
chair. President Coblentz read his address. 



To the Members af the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association : 

Another year since our eighth annual meeting has elapsed, bringing us again 
together from our accustomed posts of duty, not only to renew old friendships with 
pleasure and recreation, but to exchange ideas of both scientific and trade interests. 
We must come willingly prepared to impart, as well as to receive information, 
striving to promote true pharmaceutical progress and the welfare of our Association. 

In this particular I cannot urge too strongly upon your attendance and close 
attention to the reading of papers, and let every member come forward and partici- 
pate in the discussions; these, although occupying a very little time, form the most 
valuable and instructive part of our meetings. After this is over you will Hnd ample 
opportunity for the full enjoyment of the programme offered by our hosts. Our 
membership ranks among the first in size compared to our sister associations, and I 
do not think stands in the rear in ability; but the interest and value of its meetings 






10 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

lays entirely ¥rith you. Oar increase in membership is a singular one. According 
to our Secretary's last report, up to the present meeting we now have a total of 910 
members, with a total loss of 91 from deaths, resignations and dropped from roll, 
whidi I consider a very satisfactory showing after an existence of eight years. The 
place of meeting and probably attractions may account for the irregular increase of 
members. Starting in Columbus in 1879 with total of 45. 

Members elected in 1880, at Dayton 147 

*• " 1881, *• Toledo. .....142 

" *• 1882, " Zanesville 154 

*• •• *• 1883, ** Cleveland 126 

" 1884, " Cincinnati 234 

1885, *' Sandusky 77 

1886, "Springfield 81 

Gentlemen, we must not allow this decrease to continue, as the older we become, 
the greater the loss. We want members in every town, large and small, who will 
attend and lend their assistance; then we will find a lessening of the disposition 
toward ill-feeling, and the tendency among the profession to cut prices, thus lower- 
ing the business to the level of common tradesmen. We must not allow our interest 
to lax, we must make our meetings as interesting and entertaining as possible, take 
hold of our new members and push them forward in order that they may not help 
but take an interest. In addition I would urge upon every member to provide 
himself with blank applications and take pride in securing new members whenever 
possible. The field is large and we represent but a portion of the pharmacists of 
Ohio. It is a duty that every registered pharmacist owes to himself and his calling 
to become a member of the State Association. It is not for the benefit and advance- 
ment of a few; it is making earnest efforts to elevate and protect your profession, 
and its great work has just begun. Inroads are being attempted upon every side; 
we must be upon the alert, and by our combined efforts protect legitimate business. 
The objects of our Association are for the elevation of the practice of Pharmacy by 
the dissemination of knowledge and maintenance of its dignity, interchange of ideas 
upon practical subjects, sustaining our Board of Pharmacy, maintenance of fraternal 
relations with our sister organizations, securing legislation relative to the proper 
interests of Pharmacy and the promotion of sociability and harmony among our 
city and town pharmacists. 

Our membership has been diminished by the death of seven of our co-laborers who 
have been called from us to pass into that mysterious land beyond. I refer to £. 
Bixel, of Cleveland; E. Kistner, A. Wagner, H. F. Reum, of Cincinnati; J. F. 
Uthe, of North Amherst, S. J. Nicolay, of Hamilton, and P. F. Sherrick, of 
Delphos. 

We also sustain a slight loss by resignations and members dropped from roll. 

An Association the size of ours cannot be conducted without financial support. 
Its financial prosperity is of first importance and in view of the delinquence and 
loss of members, we should feel it our duty to remit promptly upon receipt of 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 1 

notice of our annual dues, which certainly are small enough, and their neglect on 
this account would certainly 'be inexcusable. If you are unable to attend our meet- 
ings you should be willing to encourage the good work now progressing by prompt 
payment of your $i.oo per year. In the work of collection of dues our efficient 
Treasurer has labored faithfully with but partial success, and to assist him in the 
performance of this unpleasant task, I would recommend (in accordance with the 
suggestions of our Secretary and Treasurer), that the collection of dues be placed in 
the hands of some bank selected by the Treasurer, at Columbus. This will not incur 
more expense than that of printing and sending 6ut one or more notices to each 
member, who then is liable to lay it aside to be forgotten. 

I would recommend that our Committee on Papers and Queries be also entailed 
with the duty of that of a Committee on Adulterations and Deteriorations, noting 
all new sophistications and substitutions of drugs that occur in the open market; also 
empower them to consult with manufacturers in the name of the Association regard- 
ing points of general information, when needed; this to be done not for purpose of 
exposing those who, by carelessness, accident or design, falsify goods, but to warn 
our members wherein to be upon their guard against this fast increasing evil. I 
would also note that information of this nature would add vastly to the practical 
value and interest of our annual proceedings. If the work would be considered too 
much for our Committee, let its numbers be increased accordingly. 

During the past year the passage and enforcement of the Dow Law has caused 
much trouble and annoyance, not only to members of our Association, but to Phar- 
macists throughout the State generally. In Youngstown, Akron, Toledo, Mansfield, 
various schemes were devised whereby liquor and compounds of it were obtained 
from several local pharmacists, and then summoned to pay the license and in many 
cases the penalty. The unfortunate feature of this law is, that it fails to discriminate 
clearly and leaves many in the doubt. Generally and more especially in the larger 
cities the pharmacists, have restricted the sale of liquors exclusively to the prescrip- 
tion. Under present conditions it is advisable for pharmacists, except where the 
amount of liquors sold justified it, to restrict the sale of it entirely, except on 
prescription. This law casts odium upon the pride of our profession, yet we must 
bear in mind that the better must suffer with the unprincipled (or whiskey element 
druggist) of which latter class there are still some to be found* 

Of forty-nine States and Territories twenty-seven now have Pharmacy Laws, 
Colorado and Pennsylvania being the most recent. Pennsylvania, commencing with 
1881, has been struggling along until recently it passed both houses and now stands 
a law. That of Indiana killed by the opposition of a certain class of their own 
Association. 

Through the steady perseverance of our Committee on Legislation, the Bill amend- 
ing Sections 4410-11 and 12 was passed, now vesting full powers to prosecute and 
enforce the law in our Board, whom we hope now will go forward and give their 
attention to its enforcement. The report of our Committee on Pharmacy Laws will 
embrace this subiect morejin detail. However, to our workers who have assisted in 
securing this amendment, and to our champions in the Legislature, our Association 



1 2 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

owes a debt of gratitude. I would earnestly request the members to assist our 
Bi)ard in reporting all cases of actual violation of our Laws; however, be well 
satisfied that they are actually violating the laws before calling the attention of the 
Board. 

The standard of our profession must be elevated and maintained, and to accom- 
plish it we must strengthen and enforce our Pharmacy Laws, and give our due 
necessary encouragement to our Institutions of Pharmaceutic Education. That a 
wonderful amount of deficiency and incompetency exists among both applicants for 
pharmacists and assistants, is evident in the fact of the number of failures before our 
State Board. Perfection in Pharmacy is impossible, as it is so related to all the 
natural sciences that a perfect acquaintance with all is rare, yet a good practical 
experience in all the details with sufficient theoretical foundation, (such that he shall 
be able to read and criticise a prescription or pharmaceutical preparation accurately 
and give his reasons for preparing it one particular way or another,) is such as our 
Board requires, and must have its evidence, thus producing a better class of 
druggists and preventing incompetent perspns from entering the trade. Yet we 
must not complain that our law does not place the management of the duties of our 
profession at once in the hands of the efficient; we must make the best of it and let 
time ferret out those incompetent pnes who took refuge, by registering under the law. 
I hope our Board will now accomplish much toward suppressing many stores which 
have been carried on in open violation to our law. The Connecticut Pharmaceutical 
Association has deposited on interest a permanent fund, thus enabling the Associa- 
tion to be run on a sound financial basis. In view of this I would recommend that 
the Association take from the funds of the Treasurer, whenever found feasible, without 
detriment to our finances, any amount that might be spared per year and place it 
in the hands of trustees of a permanent fund. This at first may seem impossible, 
but I think it will not be so difficult if our Treasurer is assisted in the collection of 
his annual dues.- Also in addition to the above I would recommend 
the adoption of the plan of life membership, which, in the Missouri State Association, 
they have placed at $io.cx). I have no doubt that many of our members would 
gladly avail themselves of this plan to avoid ever being in arrears for dues. 

In many sections of our State the local pharmacists have been annoyed by the 
drug pirate who is still to be found, without honor and standing, a nuisance to the 
public and a curse to legitimate t rade. I would suggest to local druggists, in places 
where size admits, again, the time-worn subject of the formation of local organizations, 
whenever and wherever possible, for your mutual protection. Our field is fast 
becoming more and more limited. Many pharmaceutic manufacturers are, through 
extensive advertising and presenting to physicians elegant appearing prepara- 
tions ready for dispensing, leading to the almost exclusive dispensing of medicines by 
physicians themselves, especially so in smaller cities. Continuing this way, appre- 
hensions may be entertained as to the future of Pharmacy, its dignity being leveled 
by the supplanting of scientific investigation by a submission to quackery. 

There is another feature I would incidentally mention; that is, that many of the 
registered pharmacists and assistants fail to display their Certificates of Registration; 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 13 

many from my personal observation have theirs laid away, never to be had or seen, 
unless searched for, and in some cases lost. 

I wish to remind you that in two years steps will be taken for the revision of the 
United States Pharmacopoeia of 1890. This work devolves mainly upon our Com- 
mittee, still I request the assistance of our members when our Committee calls upon 
them for any information, whether statistical or practical. Should they desire any 
radical changes, these should be brought up and fully discussed at our next meeting. 
This work is one of the highest and most honorable duties devolving upon the 
scientiBc abilities of our Association, hence we must soon condense our practical 
views upon this subject. 

At the Providence meeting of the American Pharmaceutical Association, it was 
decided to increase their standing committee on Unofficial Formulary, by the 
selection of one member from each State Association. In accordance with this I was 
requested to appont some Ohio member. I selected our Secretary, Mr. Hopp, 
whose appointment I am certain will meet your approval. This work, embracing 
the entire country in this manner, will undoubtedly result in great practical value to 
us all. 

I beg leave to suggest that the Nominating Committee confine their nominations, 
especially that of President, First Vicfe President, to members living either in the 
city or counties adjoining the place of meeting. I believe it has been customaty to 
select from our Association such members as belonged to the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association, as delegates to its meetings. I would, however, 
recommend that in accordance with some of our sister Associations, that we hereafter 
appoint as delegates from our numbers those who are not members of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association, for in this action they are virtually elected members, 
being then only requested to sign the constitution and by-laws and pay the usual 
membership fees and annual dues. 

In accordance with a suggestion made by Secretary Holmes, of the New York 
Pharmaceutical Association, all State Secretaries attending the meeting of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, at Providence^ R. I., last fall held an informal 
conference for the purpose of bringing up the subject of a yearly conference of State 
Secretaries, in connection with the American Pharmaceutical Association, for the 
purpose of discussing the best ways and means for conducting the business of State 
meetings and considering the condition of matters in the various States with a view 
to a move of general understanding of the affairs of each State in its relation to the 
general welfare of the whole. Such meetings would be of much benefit to the Sec- 
retaries individually in better fitting them to perform the duties of their offices. 
Also that our Association would work in accordance with, and assist one another in 
the accomplishment of many objects long striven for. The following resolution was 
adopted: 

" Resoivedf That a committee of three, consisting of Secretaries Holmes, Colcord, and Upson, 
be appointed to confer with the Secretaries now present as to the desirability of such a departure, 
and also to present the proposed plan to the Presidents of all State Associations, soliciting their 
opinion and co-operation." 



14 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

I would therefore recommend to the consideration of this Association the advisa- 
bility of a favorable action upon this important subject, and hope you will lend it 
your hearty support. As each Association will necessarily bear the traveling expenses 
of their Secretary, I will leave this for your future consideration. 

During last March, P. H. Bnick's time expiring as member of our Pharmacy 
Board, and it being necessary to appoint another member to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Chas. Huston, as candidate on this said Board, I appointed 
Mr. W. R. Ogier, of Columbus, to fill the vacancy. I hope the acceptance of Mr. 
Huston's resignation and the appointment of Mr. Ogier, will meet the approval of 
the Association. 

I would suggest that our Paper and Query Committee and Secretary be not 
burdened with the duty of furnishing copies of all the papers to such few represent- 
atives of the iournals as might be present at the meeting, since it is doing great 
injustice to all in thus allowing a fetu such privileges. Hence, let our papers go 
direct to our Proceedings, which should be out as soon as posssble, and then 
all may have equal opportunities of selecting and publishing such as they may desire. 
Our Proceedings, also, would then not be so old and familiar, and would be 
preserved instead of consigned to the waste basket. 

I recommend an alteration to Article 7, Chapter 1 1, under our By-Laws. It reads 
thus: 

"Pharmacists, chemists, and other scientific men, who are, or have been active members of this 
Association, and have removed from the State of Ohio, may be elected to associate membership. 
He shall not be required to contribute to the funds of the Association, etc." 

The alteration, as I suggest would be to read thus: Pharmacists and chemists and 
other scientific men, who are, or have been active members of this Association, and 
have removed from the State of Ohio, shall be regarded as an associate of this 
Association. This would relieve our officers from any annoyance regarding collection 
of dues at once, instead of deferring it to an annual meeting for his election as an 
associate member. 

I take pleasure in noting the receipt of a cordial invitation to attend the 
Minnesota Association meeting, which, unforrunately, I was unable to attend. It 
would be a pleasant feature if our officers could attend the meetings of sister 
Associations. However, the annual conference of State Secretaries, should it be 
adopted, will fully provide for this. 

* An idea was suggested to me lately by our Secretary, which I think, if carried 
out, will undoubtedly serve as a new and interesting departure. An exhibition of 
different pharmaceutical preparations, both pharmacopoeia and miscellaneous, 
prepared by different ones from among our members with estimates of their cost 
attached, will be of special interest and benefit to us all. This will also aid in the 
dissemination of new ideas. There are many new and valuable points that can be 
brought out and ''exhibited in this way, that will be practical and attractive, and 
consequently increase the interest and attendance at our meetings. I think it will be 
assisting a step in the right direction in that of encouraging our pharmacists in the 
manufacture of their own pharmaceutical preparations. One of the last admonish* 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 5 

ments our students receive before leaving our Pharmacy Colleges is, "rely upon your 
own abilities and manufacture your own pharmaceuticals," The objects of pharma- 
ceutic education are mainly for this very purpose. Yes, we should encourage this 
point as far as is in our power, that our coming generation may be pharmacists in 
every sense, and not mere tradesmen. I therefore beg leave to recommend the 
appointment of a committee of five, from different sections of the State, whose duty 
it shall be to secure exhibits of Pharmacopoeia and miscellaneous preparations, (with 
their cost of manufacture attached,) from among our members, and that such pre- 
parations shall be of their own manufacture. I would also suggest, if the above is 
adopted, that those exhibits be placed in the meeting hall, thus removing the difficulty 
of inducing members to attend the meetings while exhibits, as we now have them, 
are in progress. 

From our several committees I expect good reports. Among these, our first report 
from the Committee on Progress of Pharmacy, which undoubtedly will add much to 
the value and interest of our proceedings. . Our Paper and Query Committee have 
labored faithfully in the performance of their ever increasing duty. 

I observe the offer of a third prize for a meritorious paper. Stimulants like this 
should call forth many and valuable articles. The thanks of the Association are due 
Mr. Burton, for this offer; also to Messrs. Benton, Myers & Co. for the continuance of 
their offer. 

Our Permanent Secretary deserves the thanks of the Association for the prompt 
and careful administration of its intrusted affairs, devoting time and labor which 
most of us would certainly feel unwilling to devote. 

The local Secretary has worked hird to make the meeting successful and enter- 
taining, and no doubt will be eminently sucsessful. 

Now, fellow members and friends, I will soon relinquish the trust which one year 
ago you kindly placed in ray hands. To be chosen as the presiding officer of this, 
one of the largest State Associations, I deem an honor which I could never have 
expected. For all thi^ I thank you and our brother officers for your kind assistance 
and encouragement which has made the discharge of my official duties agreeable and 
pleasant, and shall always be a source of pleasant recollections. During the 
remaining few days of my official duties I request you to kindly forbear with me in 
any errors of. judgment I may commit, as they certainly will not be intentional. While 
hoping that the past success and prosperity of this Association is but the beginning 
of a still greater future, I bid you farewell. 

On motion, Vice President Nye appointed Messrs. J. Weyer, 
Cincinnati; J. H. Case, Akron, and M. D. Fulton, of Bucyrus, 
committee to report on the President's address. 



1 6 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

The Secretary read his report. 



Mr, President and Members of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association : 

Gentlemen — After adjournment last year, a synopsis of our meeting was sent to 
the various Pharmaceutical journals. Newly elected members were notified and 
certificates of membership issued to each one. The publication of the report was 
somewhat delayed by the preparing and adding to the report, of an alphabetical list 
of members. 

The County Correspondence Committee did their work well and promptly. The 
reports were distributed the same as the year previous. A copy was sent tojthe 
President and Secretary of each State Association and to each Pharmaceutical 
journal. Complimentary copies were received from each Association. 

The usual annual notice was sent out about two weeks before the meeting. 

Respecfully submitted, 

LEWIS C. HOPP, 
Akron, June 8, 1887. Secretary. 

On motion, report was accepted. 

The Secretary read the Treasurer's report. 

XRCAeiijRBR*ei rf;porx. 

To the Officers and Members of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association : 
Gentlemen: Your Treaj^ufer submits the following report for the past year: 

1886. RECEIPTS, 

June I. To balance cash on hand $ 19 34 

July I. To cash received from Exec. Com. (new members).. 283 50 

July I. To cash received from Exec. Com', (certificate).... 50 

July I. To cash received from Executive Committee (dues). 180 00 

July I. To cash received for certificates 2 00 

1887. 

June 2. To cash for dues to date 524 00 

$ 1,009 34 

1886. EXPENDITURES, 

June 9. By bill, A. G. Black & Co $ 50 00 

June 9. By bill, Theo. Troupe 6 40 

June 9. By bill, G. W. Voss 770 

June 15. By bill, Leader Printing Co 35 00 

June r5. By bill, L. C. Hopp 66 03 

June 21. By bill, Nitschke Brothers 17 25 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 7 

July I. Bybill, V.Coblentz ". 887 

July 8. By bill, L. C. Hopp 200 bo 

July 8. By bill, A. A. Clark 2025 

July 8. By bill, Pomerene, Davies & Hibbard 59 ' 5 

July 8. By bill, Charles Huston 4 25 

Oct, II. By bill, Nitschke Brothers » 3 75 

Oct. 26. By bill, Dr. D. Barringer 2 00 

Nov,30. By bill, Leader Printing Co 335 45 

Nov. 30. By bill, L. C. Hopp, Secretary w 45 34 

1887. 

FebV 2. By bill, Joseph Feil 16 50 

March 8. By Bill, Nitschke Brothers 2 75 

May 24. By bill, Nitschke Brothers 2 75 — - $ 883 44 

Balance .on hand $125 90 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES HUSTON, 
Columbus, Ohio, June 3, 1887. Treasurer, 

On motion of Mr. Nye the report was referred to an auditing 
committee of three. The President appointed Messrs. G. L. Hechler, 
M. D. Fulton and J. I. Beck. 

Geo. W. Voss, Chairman of Executive Committee, read their report. 

HXBCUXIVH COMBIIXXHH RHPORX. 

To the Officers and Members of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association : 

Gentlemen: Your Executive Committee beg leave to submit to you their report 
for the past year. Through the 'kindness of our Secretary, we were relieved from 
the duty of publishing our annual transactions. He had the work executed in a 
very creditable manner and it presents a neat appearance. The Treasurer's report 
shows a larger surplus on hand this year than we had last, which is certainly very 
gratifying and proves the financial affairs of the Association to be in a prosperous 
condition. 

The efforts of our local Secretary and the Special Committee appointed by him, 
have en«ibled us this year to add an exhibit to the attractions of the convention that 
reflects great credit upon the gentlemen having it in charge. 

The Pharmacy law, as amended since our last meeting, empowers the State Board 
of Pharmacy to bring suit through th^ county prosecuting attorney against any 
person infringing it. 

We would suggest that our meetings in the future commence no later than 
Tuesday, as the members remaining to enjoy the entertainment which usually follows 



1 8 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

the day of our adjournment, will then be spared the annoyance and inconvenience 
of returning home on Sunday. 

Eighty-one new members were added to the roll at our last meeting, a fact very 
pleasant to contemplate, as it not only shows that our labors have the approval of 
the profession of the State, but also proves that there is a desire among pharmacists 
to join in the advancement of scientific pharmaceutical knowledge and the elevation 
of the profession. 

Again we are called upon to mourn the loss of some of our members. Since our 
last meeting seven have passed to their eternal home, highly honored and respected, in 
their several places of abode, their loss is greatly felt; but the influence of their 
example still lives to point the way to honor and esteem, and urge us on to renewed 
efforts in the work we are called upon to perform. That when the hour of our departure 
shall arrive, we also may be found ready and worthy to receive that blessed com- 
mendation, *'WelI done, thou good and faithful servant." 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. W. VOSS, 
D. R. ARNOLD, 

Akron, O., June 8, 1887. THEO. TROUPE. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



19 



EDWARD CHRISTIAN KISTNER, of Cincinnati, O., 

Was born in Hanover, Germany, August 26, 1844. He came to this country with 
his parents when eleven years old. They settled in New firemen, Ohio. When 
sixteen years old he entered the drug business as clerk, in the employ first of Mr. 
Carl Backhaus, of Cincinnati, and then with his father. At the age of twenty-tw o 
he commenced business for himself. This he carried on at several localities unt il 
his death, which occurr^ September 22, 1886, age, forty-two. 

Deceased was a member of the A. O. U. W. and the Turner Verein. A widow 
and one son is left to mourn his loss. He joined the Association in 1884. 



JOHN FREDERICK UTHE, of North Amherst, O., 

Was bom in Cleveland, O. , August 21, 1846 . He was raised in North Amherst. In 1863 
he entered the employ of W. F. Wooster, druggist of Elyria, Ohio, and remained until 
1865, when he returned to North Amherst and commenced the study of medicine. In 
1872 he started in the drug business in that place, and two years after he entered into a 
co-partnership with Mr. Clements. He remained in the firm until 1875, when he 
removed to Cleveland, returned again in 1877, and engaged in the drug 
business. In 1885 Mr. E. Nichols was admitted into partnership. He continued 
in business until his death November 10, 1886. He was married in 1868. He 
was a thorough and conscientious business man, beloved by the community who 
honored him with several public positions. 

He was a member of the American Legion of Honor and Knights of Pythias. 
He became a member of .the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association in 1884. 



AUGUST WAGNER, of Cincinnati, O., 

Was bom in Hanover, Germany, January 6, 1818. He left high school when 
fourteen years of age and served an apprenticeship of five years in Noerton bei 
Goettingen. From there he went to Hamburg, and in 1842 sailed for America. 
He first came to New Bremen, Ohio, and opened a pharmacy. After remaining 
there one and a half years he went to Cincinnati, and there opened a pharmacy. 
In 1866 he entered the wholesale firm of Vogeler, Wagner & Co., but in 1881 
withdrew and opened a retail pharmacy, which he conducted until the day of his 
death, which occurred December 13, 1886. During the number of years of his 
life spent in this city, he, by his natural urbanity, uniform courtesy and gentlemanly 
deportment, gained hosts of friends, and all who became acquainted with him 
respected and loved him for his many good qualities of head and heart He leaves 
a widow, two sons and three daughters. He joined the Ohio State Pharmaceutical 
Association in 1882. 



20 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION^ 



SILAS J. NICOLAY, M.D., of Hamilton, O., 

Was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, February 8, 1847. He attended school 
until fourteen years old, and then served an apprenticeship of three years with a 
silversmith. In 1864 he entered the 107 Regiment of Pennsylvania Veteran Vol- 
unteers, and served until the close of the war. While in the service his regiment 
participated iu many serious engagements. He came to Ohio in 1865; attended 
school at Lebanon, and then taught in Butler and Hamilton counties. He after- 
wards studied medicine and graduated at the Medical College of Ohio, in 1874. 
He practiced in Illinois until 1880, when he removed to Hamilton, Ohio, and 
purchased a drug store, which he continued to carry on until his death May 11, 
1887. He leaves a wife and one child. He was a Mason and Odd Fellow and a 
member of the G. A. R. He became- a member of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical 
Association in 1882. 



H. F. REUM, 



Born in Hamburg, Germany, January 13, 1837, his parents removing shortly after to 
Kassel, where he received his earlier education and studied chemistry under 
the noted Prof. Schwartzkopf. Left Germany for America in 1856, !coming to 
Cincinnati; continued his studies under the late lamented Prof. Fennel, and'after, 
under Mr. Karrman, of this city. In i860 he purchased the pharmacy corner 
John and Clark, and soon after removed \ to comer of Fifth and 
Broadway, where he remained as one one of the leading pharmacists of this city. 
He was President of the Cincinnati College of Pharmacy in 1879. Died May 31, 
1887. He joined the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association in 1881. 



EMIL BIXEL, of Cleveland, O., 

Died September, 1886. He became a member of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical 
Association in 1880. 



P. F. SHERRICK, of Delphos, O., 
Died the same year he became a member of the Association, in 1886. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 2 1 

V 

On motion the report was accepted. 

The Secretary read the report of the Committee on Trade Interest. 

To the Officers and members of the Association : 

Your Committee would report that the past year has not been an eventful one to 
the drug trade. Cutting in prices has been found to be unremunerative to those 
who hoped by that means to capture their neighbor's patrons and has been almost 
entirely abandoned throughout the State. 

The beneficial effects of the Pharmacy Law are being felt, and as it becomes 
better understood and its provisions more fully enforced, we think it will prove as 
great an advantage to the trade as was expected by its friends. 

The rapid multiplication of patent medicine is becoming a serious annoyance to 
the trade, as the various schemes of advertising induce druggists to lay in a supply to 
meet the expected demand, which frequently never comes, and the result is shelves 
loaded with unsalable stock; and the same may be said in regard to many of the 
various remedies of the manufacturing chemist introduced to the notice of the 
physician who would like to try them, and recommends them to their druggist, who 
lays in a supply to his frequent sorrow and regret. 

The liquor law known as the Dow^Law, in its bearing on the drug trade has been 
the cause of some difficulty. Liquors used medicinally are a part of the druggist's 
business, and while your committee have no sympathy for those who turn their 
pharmacies into saloons, we think the restriction on its sale as medicine should not 
be limited to the prescription of a physician. This inconvenience is felt more 
severely in our smaller towns than in the cities, as many physicians are not in the 
habit of writing their prescriptions, simply telling their patients to send to the 
apothecaries for such remedies as they do not carry with them, and neither do many 
of our patrons think of applying to a physician for liquor any more than they do for 
camphor, peppermint or paregoric. The writer has been compelled more than once 
to send a customer to the neighboring saloon for liquor when he had been directed 
by his physician to go to the drug store for it, but failed to give his written *order. 
Your committee are aware that it is a difficult subject to handle, but do not think 
it was the intention of our legislators to do any one an injustice, and think the law 
might be so amended as to allow the druggist to be the judge of its legitimate use, 
either by requiring the name of the buyer to be registered as in the purchase of 
poison, or the customer to sign a certificate that it is not to be used as a beverage. 

The absence of speculation and the unusual steadiness of prices have enabled 
druggists to make a fair and legitimate profit, and the dullness of trade of the earlier 
portion of the year has been succeeded by a decided increase in volume of sales in 



22 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

all branches of the busmess, so that your committee think that the year has been a 
satisfactory one to the trade in general. 

Respectfully submitted. 

C. B. Johnson, Middletown, 

C. W. TOBEY, Troy, 

C. A. Smith, Springfield, 
On motion, report was accepted. 

Mr. Feii, Chairman of Committee on Papers and Queries read 
their report. 

COMBIIXXHB OB9 PAPHRS AB9D QVBRIES. 

Your committee prepared a list of queries and headed it with a special appeal for 
notes and list of preparations of the U. S. P., '80 — rarely or never called for. This 
was given a prominent place in the proceedings by the Secretary, and hence it was 
deemed necessary to send out only one copy to each member additional, which was 
done in January. The committee also desire to call attention to the kindness of 
Messrs. Benton, Myers & Co., of Cleveland, in repeating their offer of last year of 
two prizes for answers to queries, namely: a Troemner Balance, list price, $25, 
and a B. M. & Co. Suppository Mould, valued at $8; also the kindness of Mr. G. F. 
Burton, of Springfield, Ohio, in offering as third prize a Burton Percolating and 
Filtering Apparatus, these prizes to be awarded by a committee appointed by the 
President. 

The replies to the queries have not been so numerous as they were the past two 
years, but the quality of work has been of unusual excellence, and in this respect 
the committee feel well repaid for their labors. 

The answers to the notes and special appeal for queries Nos. i, 2 and 3, have been 

ew, and at least in number not satis&ctory. 

Joseph Feil, 

W. SiMONSON, 

H. C. Cook. 
On motion, report was accepted. 

Mr. Fulton read report of Committee on Pharmacy Laws. 

COMBIIXXHH OK PHARMACY I«A^W8. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen : 

Ycur Committee on Pharmacy Laws ound little work to perform during the past 
winter. There being no antagonistic legislation introduced towards our present law, 
hence our report will be brief. 

You are aware of the passage of the amendment making the Pharmacy Board 
prosecutors of any reported violations of the law. With this addition we have the 
best law in the country, and your committee are of opinion that further amendments 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 23 

at this time would not be politic. We advise the passage of a law excusing 
pharmacists from jury duty, and would urge each and every member to interest himself 
in the passage of the bill when it comes up the coming winter. 

Wm. M. Melville, 

J. A. NiPGEN, 

Chas. Huston, 
F. M. Heath, 
M. D. Fulton. 
On motion, report was accepted. 

Mr. John Weyer read report of Ohio Board of Pharmacy. 

OHIO BOARD OF PHARBfACY RBPORT. 

In accordance with statutory provision the Ohio Board of Pharmacy, through its 
Secretary, submits its annual report for the year ending March 31, 1887, to the Ohio 
State Pharmaceutical Association. 

During the year ending April i, 1887/ the Board held six meetings for the exam- 
ination of applicants for registration, as follows: Columbus, May 10, 1886; Tol^o, 
August 3, 1886; Cleveland, October 11, 1886; Columbus, November 23, 1886; 
Cincinnati, January 10, 1887; Columbus, March I, 1887. 

At these examinations two hundred and twenty-three appeared to register as 
Pharmacists, and one hundred and thirty-six as Assistant Pharmacists. Of these 
applicants one hundred and two received certificates of competency as Pharmacists, 
and forty-eight as Assistant Pharmacists, being 46 per cent, of the former, and 35^ 
per cent, of the latter. 

Your attention has heretofore been called te the small percent^e of successful 
applicants at these examinations, and the marked decrease ift the ratio during the 
past year is no flattering comment upon the training and education of these aspirants, 
when you consider that the aim has been to make the test a practical rather than a 
theoretical one. 

There must be a radical change in the views of the druggists of Ohio concerning 
the kind of material out of which they assist in manufacturing the Pharmacists of 
the future. The majority of the examination papers, even of those which show a 
fair degree of proficiency in Pharmaceutical skill, exhibit a lamentable ignorance of 
the elementary principles of a common school education. The idea appears to be, 
not '*how high a degree of excellence can I attain in this my chosen line of work, 
but how 'little can I know to squeeze through the examinations of the Board of 
Pharmacy, and get a certificale to practice upon the people." 

The **salts and senna" age in Pharmacy has gone by, and it has come to be a 
many sided science, the foundation for a fair comprehension of which must be laid 
in a mind that has had some previous training in habits of study and observation; 
and just so long as ignorant, uneducated boys are taken into drug stores as appren- 
tices, and pushed forward as assistants as early as they learn the names and location 



24 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

of common remedies in that one store, just so long will it be the dnty of the Ohio 
Board of Pharmacy to weed out the incompetent young men who are crowding 
forward to secure legal recognition of their excessive ignorance. 

The term of service of Mr. P. H. Brack having expired April i, 1887, Governor 
Foraker appointed Mr. W. R. Ogier, of Columbus, his successor. Mr. Brack was 
a most valuable member of the Board, and retired with the highest esteem of his 
colleagues, to assume the duties of an important public office at the call of his 
fellow citizens. 

The amendments to the Pharmacy Law enacted during tbe recent session of the 
Legislature, were valuable and timely, and will doubtless be brought to your attention 
by the Committee on Pharmacy Laws. 

The board met for reorganization on April I, 1887, and elected E. M. Hatton, 
President; F. T. Bower, Vice President, and J. A. Nipgen, Secretary and Treasurer. 

The following finacial exhibit will show the receipts and expenditures for the year,, 
and the condition of the treasury at its close: ^ 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand April i, 1886, .... - $6,128 67 

Cash received to April i, 1887, - • - - • 402 oo- 



Total, - - - - - - $6,530 67^ 

EXPENDITURES. 

May 1 1 — Zanesville Courier, printing questions, - , - 

E. G. Roberts, rent of office, 

Senter & Lerdi, mailing tubes, .... 

Krebs Lith. Co., certificates, . . . - 

J. H. Serco, printing, . - . . - 

Bow & Beggs, Linoleum, .... 

J . H. Trange, blank book, 

Hann & Adair, printing, .... 

Com. College, rent for examination, 
Oct, 1 1 — E. G. Roberts, rent of office, . . - . 

A. C. Bertin & Co., printing, .... 

1887. 
January — Rent of hall for examination in Cincinnati, 

A. C. Bertin & Co., printing, .... 

Feb'y — L. T. Neal, legal opinion, . - . . 

E. G. Roberts, rent of office, .... 

Total, - - -. ■ - - $430 33. 



30 50 


48 


oo- 


I 


40 


18 


00 


I 


75 


20 


48 


5 


75 


5 35 


6 


oo- 


60 


00 


56 35 


20 


00 


34 75 


50 


00 


72 


00 



i^S 



183 6s 
190 81 
219 70 
122 05 

759 33 


$1,905 87 
4624 80 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

F. T. Bower, per diem and expenses, 
John Weyer, ..... 

Edgar M. Hatton, - 

J. A. Nipgen, ..... 

P. H. Bruck, salary for 15 months, $625.00; do necessary 
expenses, $134 33, ..... 

Total, ....... 

Balance on hand April i, 1887, ..... 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. NIPGEN, 

Secretary, 
On motion, report was accepted. 

President Coblentz appointed the following Committee on Nomina- 
tion of Officers for the ensuing year: Thomas Johnson, Steubenville; 
John Weyer, Cincinnati; A. Warner, Akron; J. H. Wahmhoff, 
Delphos; A. Hitchman, Bettsville; Phil Lehr, Cleveland; Fred 
Berg, Upper Sandusky ; Prof. C. T. P. Fennel, Cincinnati, and W. 
H. Albro, Medma. 

Mr. Voss read the names of nine applicants for membership. 

On motion, adjourned until 2 p.m. 



SECOND SESSION. Wednesday afternoon, January 8, 1887. 

On motion, the minutes of the morning "^session, as read by the 
Secretary, were approved. 

The President appointed Messrs. N. Rosewater, Cleveland ; John 
Weyer, Cincinnati ; Joseph I. Beck, Springfield, Committee on Prizes. 

The Secretary read report of Committee on Unofficinal Formulary, 

The Committee on National Formulary of Unofficinal Preperations, appointed 
under the auspices of the American Pharmaceutical Association, give a preliminary 
draft as printed in the last proceedings, comprising of 407 formulas, 414 titles; uf 
this number, 142 are Elixirs, 16 Emulsions, 10 Fluid Extracts, 10 Liniments, 44 
Solutions, 17 Mixtures, 15 Powders and Compounds, 12 Spirits, 35 Syrups, 32 
Tinctures, 14 Medicated Wines, including a few formulas for Pills, Pepsins, Oils, 
Lotions, Glycerites, Plasters, Collodion Compounds and Acids. One hundred and 



t . t 



,■' -- 



2 6 OHIO ST A TE PHARMACEUTICAL A SSOCIATION. 

three formulas, under respective titles, have 259 additional formulas, making the 
total number.558 — the pioduct of the Committee and Pharmaceutical Associations. 
The multiplicity of formulas and similarity from a chemical and therapeutical 
standpoint, is apparent, and when the stated revision takes place, the numbers will 
be lessened in a report to the coming meeting of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association. The gentlemen of the Committee and their oo*laborers deserve the 
thanks of the Pharmacists of the country for their task in presenting formulas which 
have sprung into notoriety within a generation — some of merit, many of none; but 
nevertheless have become popular with the people and physicians through the 
agencies of designing manufacturers, at the expense of reputable Pharmacy, not only 
in this country, but abroad. A meeting of the Pharmaceutical Conference was held 
at Birmingham, England, last August, when a committee on unofficinal formulary 
was appointed with 'the object, as termed, '*To popularize elegant Pharmacy, in 
order to put it within the power of every chemist to compete on advantageous terms 
with many proprietary mixtures and syrups which are so widely advertised." 

The National Formulary Committee make the following announcement: "That 
contributions and criticisms are solicited from members of the profession outside of 
the Committee, or from those located in states where no representative or member of 
the Committee resides." Therefore, remarks in regaVd to a few of the important 
formulas are in order. One-third being Elixirs, and of the greater importance to 
Pharmacists, and in which Poly Pharmacy is most apparent. The term. Elixir, as 
used at present, means a mixture of a pleasant tasting aromatic flavor, in combina- 
tion with medicines, in order to disguise any disagreeable taste. An objection exists 
in the multiplicity of these flavors. Pharmacists only need a few reliable formulas 
for unofficinal flavoring preparations. Three would be quite sufficient, one Aromatic 
Tincture prepared from spices, one Compound Orange Flavor prepared from fresh 
orange and lemon peel, coriander, etc., the same as Aromatic Spirit, an excellent 
flavor containing very little Tannin, and most useful; the third a Fragrant Spirit 
similar to the one recommended by Prof. Bennington, made from fresh essential oils 
and Alcohol, being devoid of Tannin, therefore appropriate for preparations con- 
taining Iron. The above Tincture or Spirit flavoring to be made into Elixirs, one 
part to two parts of syrup or syrup and water. An Aromatic Elixir being appropriate 
where the Tannin from spices may be desirable or not therapeutically objectionable. 
Being useful combined with astringents, tonics, griping purgatives, carminatives 
and corrective cordials. As a spice or aromatic Elixir, the Committee authorize 
Compound Elixir of Taraxacum, and give it as a flavoring for a number of Elixirs. 
Why dandelion root of no flavor, and wild cherry bark, a weak and unstable flavor 
compared to strong spices, should be mixed with the latter, cannot be sustained on 
rational grounds. These should be displaced with coriander seed, and anise added 
with the amount of cinnamon, and cardamon increased. First making the Aromatic 
Tincture. 






OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 2 7 • 

AROMATIC TIN'CTURE. 

Coriander, - - 240 grs. 

Cinnamon, ...... 240 grs. 

Cardamon, - - 180 grs. 

Canada Snake Root, - - - 120 grs. 

Canim, - - - - - - 120 grs. 

Anise, -..-.. 120 grs. 

Cloves, - - - - 60 grs. 

Nutmegs, ....-- 60 grs. 

Glycyerhiza, (Russian peeled and cut,) - - 960 grs. 

Diluted Alcohol, - - - - - 16 fld ozs. 

Grind substances to No. 40 powder and percolate, adding water (after all of the 
diluted Alcohol has passed) until 16 ozs. of Aromatic Tincture is received. 

AROMATIC ELIXIR. 

Aromatic Tincture, - - - - - 8 fl. ozs. 

Syrup, - - - - - 16 fl. ozs. 

As stated, the aromatic spirit prepared from the fresh orange and lemon peel, as per 
No. 314, is the best formula that has yet been ofifered, suitable for making any kind of 
medicated Elixir, having no Iron in its compound. Fresh essential oils of orange and 
lemon are at times difficult to secure. This elixir made from the fresh peel is 
always satisfactory. The name Aromatic Spirit should be changed to Compound 
Spirit of Orange, and an Elixir prepared by mixing equal parts of this Compound 
Spirit, Syrup and water; filter. This Elixir should be titled Compound Elixir o 
Orange, and the Elixir having the same name, (No. 28) having, extracts of Gentian, 
Wormwood, Buckbean, and other unpleasant tasting drugs, should not have the 
name of Compound Elixir of Orange, even if it is from the Pharm. term. 

The third. Fragrant Spirit,an appropriate name, prepared from fresh essential oils. 

FRAGRANT SPIRIT. 

Oil of Orange, .... 6 fluid drachms. 

Oil of Rose, . : . . 20 minims. 

Oil Coriander, . ■ . . i fluid drachm. 

Oil Bitter Almonds, • - - ' 2 minims. 

Oil Cloves, .... 2 minims. 

Alcohol, qs., - - - 4 fld ozs. 

Note — One-third, at least, of the oil of orange should be replaced by the oil of 
lemon, the flavor of the latter being always acceptable, and the cloves, by cinnamon, or 
by adding the last. 

ELIXIR FRAGRANT. 

Fragrant Spirit, - - - - 2 fld drachms. 

Alcohol, - - - - - 4 fld ozs. 

Syrup, - - - 6 fld ozs. 

Water, - - - - - 6 fld ozs. 

Calcium Phosphate Precip., - - - 120 grs. 



28 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

First pour into a bottle the fragrant spirit,add Alcohol, then phosp. calcium. Shake 
well, then add syrup; shake again; lastly water, and pass through a wetted filter. This 
Elixir should be used for all Elixirs or mixtures containing Iron; and often desirable as a 
change from the other Elixirs or Flavoring Spirits in the numerable preparations. 
The Adjuvant Elixir, (No. 17) could well be dispensed with, in not proving satisfac- 
tory, compared toothers. Also Tincture Aromatic, (No. 367.) Anise, 10 drs., cinna- 
mon, I tr. oz., coriander, 5 drs., caraway, 3 drs., dil. Alcohol to make. 16 fid. oz. This 
preparation contains too great a proportion of anise for a popular Aromatic Flavor- 
ing. The Elixir Cinchona Bark and Detannated Elixir of Cinchona, preparations 
weak, and often of uncertain alkaloidal strength, should be replaced by Elixir 
Cinchona Alkaloids. The formula given by the Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
Pharmaceutical Association, although not strong, is definite in amount of alkaloids. 

ELIXIR CINCHONA ALKALOIDS. 

Quinine Sulphate, ..... 18 grs. 

Cinchonin, ..... 6 grs. 

Quinidia, ...-.- ^ grs. 

Cinchonidia, ..... 3 grs. 

Elixir of Orange, - - - • - 16 fl. ozs./ 

One grain of Alkaloids to each tablespoonful. By increasing amount 
of Alkaloids, four times, would make I grain to each teaspoonful 
— the strength of most Elixirs containing one or more of the Cinchona 
Alkaloids. 

For improving the taste of Elixirs containing bromides or hypophosphites of the 
alkalies or alkaline earths, it is recommended by the Committee that 30 grs. of 
Citric Acid be added to each pint. 

The Pennsylvania and Wisconsin Committee recommend Powdered Talcum in the 
place of Precipitate Phosphate Calcium for clarifying through filters. 

Compound Elixir of Chloral and Bromide Potassium, (No. 46.)Chloral and Bromide 
of Potassium, each 4tr. oz., extract Cannabis (Indian), extract Hyoscyamus, each 16 
grs.; water enough to make 16 fl. ozs. The resinous extract of Cannabis being 
insoluble in water, therefore useless after the preparation is filtered. 

The above is supposed to represent "Bromidia," in having the same amounts of 
chemicals and drugs, excepting Alcohol, 2 fl. ozs. to dissolve the ext. Cannabis, and 
14 fluid ozs. of water. 

Formula No. 4, Diluted Glacia Phosphoric Acid: Glacia Phosphoric Acid I tr. oz. 
Aqua to make 10 fld. ozs. ; necessary when Phosphate or Pyro-phosphate of Iron, 
U. S. P., is to be combined of dissolved in a mixture with Diluted Phosphoric 
Acid, the officinal tribasic acid being inadmissible. 

Formula 5, Chloroform Water: Purified chloroform 30 min., distilled water 10 fl. 
ozs. ; recommended as a preservative agent for keeping solutions free from micro 
organism. 

The National Formulary Committee should print a formula for Solution of 
Chlorate of Potassium, kept by many apothecaries for a uniform proportion of 
Chlorate of Potassium, i tr. oz. to water 16 fi. ozs. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



29 



Formula 174, Emulsion of Turpentine: Comprising oil of Turpentine, powdered 
Acacia, syrup and water. Mode of preparation recommended. Pour the oil of 
Turpentine into a bottle of size required, cork and agitate so as to oil inside of bottle; 
then add Acacia and shake again. Finally, add syrup and water; mix thoroughly 
by shaking. A note states that **this is not a true Emulsion and will separate on 
standing," which is certainly correct. 

The writer has for years made satisfactory Emulsions in the following manner: 
Pour the amount of any oil ordered, into a bottle of size required, adding as much 
water as there is oil; set aside; then place into mortar the Acacia; sugar, if wanted, 
adding only sufficient water to make quite a thick mucilage, smoothly worked. Then 
shake oil and water in a thorough manner until quite milky in appearance; then 
quickly pour this into the mucilage, stirring it in active manner before the oil and 
water has time to separate, which should also be added to mucilage in successive 
portions, keeping up shaking during intervals. 

In prescribing an Emulsion of Turpentine, if physicians would order an equal 
amount of a fixed oil of sweet almonds or olive oil, to that of oil of turpentine, a 
more satisfactory Emulsion could be secured both mechanically and therapeutically. 

JACKSON'S COUGH SYRUP NO. I. 

Morphia Hydrochlorate, - . • . 4 grs. 

Oil Sassafras, - - - - - 2 minims. 

Syrup Acacia, - - - - 16 fid ozs. 

The above formula originated in Philadelphia, but in many seetions of 
Northern and Middle States Jackson's Cough Syrup, (Compound Syrup of 
Morphia,) is quite in demand. For this the following formula should be published: 

JACKSON'S COUGH SYRUP NO. 2. 

Fluid Extract Ipecac, - - - }i fluid drachm. 

Fluid Extract Seneza, - • • 2 fluid drachms. 

Fluid Extract Rhubarb, . . ■ 2 fluid drachms. 

Morphia Muriate, • . • - 4 grs. 

S)rrup, ..... 16 ozs. 

Oil Sassafras, - - - -16 drops. 



AROMATIC VINEGAR. 



Oil of Lavender, 
Oil Rosemary, 
Oil Juniper, 
Oil Cinnamon, 
Alcohol 
Acetic Acid, 
Water, qs., 



4 mmims. 
4 minims. 
4 minims. 
4 minims. 

3 fluid ozs. 

4 fluid ozs. 
16 ozs. 



Note — The oils of Juniper and Peppermint are objectionable. Preparation 
is weak in perfumes, also Alcohol, and too strong in Acetic' Acid. The following 
formula of Aromatic Vinegar will prove satisfactory: 



30 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



AROMATIC VINEGAR. 



Oil of Lemon, 
Oil Lavender, 
Oil Rosemary, 
Oil Cloves, 
Camphor Gum, 
Tr. Benzoin, 
Tr. Orris, 
Tr. Tonka, 
Alcohol Sronger, 
Acetic Acid, 
Rosewater qs. , 



I fluid drachm. 
^ fluid drachm. 
lo drops, 
lo drops. ' 

1 drachm. 

2 fluid drachms. 
2 fluid drachms. 
2 fluid drachms. 
8 fluid czs. 

2 fluid czs. 
1 6 ozs. 



Dissolve oils and Camphor in Alcohol; add Acetic Acid; lastly Rosewater; 
shake, let stand a few days and filter. 

WINE OF COCA. 

Fluid Extract Coca, . . . - i fluid oz. 

Alcohol, ..... I fluid oz. 

Claret, (or any palatable wine,) - - • 14 fluid ozs. 

Dr. Chas. Mitchell, after investigating five difi*erent popular Wines of Coca, found the 
average quantity of Alkaloid to be from o. 16 to o. 18 J" to the fluid ounce, correspond- 
ing from 25 to 28^ grs. of Coca leaves assaying 0.65 J^ of Alkaloid. A prominent 
foreign brand showed o. I2gr. of Alkaloid to the fluid oz. He suggests that Coca Wine 
be made to represent,as above,30 grs .of the drug to the fluid oz., corresponding to about 
4*5 grain of Alkaloid, if the Ccoa leaves are of superior quality. This strength allows 
from half to one wine-glass full being administered. In administering^ Wine of 
Coca, Dr. Hammond, it is stated, recommends Hydrochlorate of Cocaine grs. 2, to 
Wine 16 fl. ozs. Others give 3 grs. of the Alkaloid to 16 fl. ozs. In order to 
improve thq flavor of the Wine, mix Elixir of Orange 2 fl. ozs. to 14 fl. ozs. of 
Wine. • Respectfully submitted, v 

Cincinnati, June 7, 1887. J. D. WELLS. 

On motion, report was accepted. 

Mr. Voss read report of Committee on Tax on Alcohol and Liquor 
License. 



OF COnmilTTBB OI« TAX OK ALrCOHOLr AKD 
LrlQVOR LrlCBKSB. 

Gentlemen — Your committee hereby respectfully present the following report and 
" petition " for the amendment of section 3246, pertaining to special taxes of the^ 
internal revenue laws of the revised statutes of the United States: 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 3I 

To the Honorable Members of the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States: 

Through M. C. , District, Ohio, 

U. S. Senator. 

The petitition of the undersigned Apothecaries of . ^ ■ . .^ in the 

State of Ohio. The internal taxation enacted by the General Gove mment during 
the War, was created in order to meet a large indebtedness. Said taxation maintained 
in time of peace, results in the accumulation of an unnecessarily large surplus in the 
National Treasury. This condition calls for the abolishment of Special Taxation at 
present levied upon certain business interests. We, therefore, respectfully ask an 
amendment to Section 3246, which reads in part, viz. : 

"Nor shall any Special Tax be imposed upon apothecaries as to vinous or 
spirituous Liquors which they use exclusively in preparation or in making up 
medicines.'' 

We respectfully request that by amendment the following sentences be added after 
the word "medicines;" to section quoted above, viz.: 

^* Nor as to prescriptions xinritten bf physicians and the sale of Alcohol for arts and 
domestic uses or general manufacturing purposes^ ttkirwise than for re-distilling ^ 
rectifying or compounding of spirituous Liquors, " 

Whereas, under existing section 3246, no apothecary is permitted to supply to the 
sick, wines or liquors upon physicians' prescriptions, or to sell Alcohol at retail for 
domestic uses, etc., without the payment of a tax of twenty- five dollars ($25.00) 
per annum to the General Government. 

For these reasons we pray that you will take special interest in having the above 
amendment adopted. 

AMENDMENT TO THE DOW LAW. 

To the Honorable Senators and Members of the House of Representatives of the State 
of Ohio: 

We, the undersigned druggists and pharmacists, do hereby respectfully ask that 
you amend the Dow Liquor Law, as follows: 

"All apothecaries holding a certificate from the Ohio Board of Pharmacy shall be 
permitted to sell Wines and Liquors, for sickness, upon a Mvitten order of a parent 
or person of non-intemperate habits; that he, she, or they shall solemnly affirm by 
signature upon a legal form drawn by an legally authorized officer, that the purchase 
is not intended otherwise than set forth." 

Recommended to the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association. 

J. D. WELLS, Cincinnati 
THOMAS JOHNSON, Steubenville. 
C. M. MILLER, Mansfield. 

On motion, report was referred to committee of three. , 



3 2 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

President Coblentz appointed Messrs. W. J. Martin, Cincinnati ; 
G. L. Hechler, Cleveland ; R. W. Crane, Greensburg. 
The Secretary read the following telegrams : 

Richmond, Ind., June 7, rSSy. 
To Virgil Cobieniz, President Ohio Pharmaceutical Association : 
Indiana sends hearty greetings and best wishes for prosperous meeting. 

Leo. Eli el, President, 

HoLYOKE, Mass., June 8, 1887. 
To President Ohio Pharmaceutical Association^ Akron, O,: 
Accept fraternal greeting from Massachusetts State Pharmaceutical Association. 

J. W. COLCORD. 

Grafton, West Virginia, June 8, 1887. 
To President Ohio Pharmaceutical Association : 

West Virginia, in convention assembled, sends best wishes for pleasant and 
prosperous meeting. J. A. Grant, President. 

On motion, the President was instructed to reply to these telegrams 
and to send telegram of greeting to the Kansas Association. 



REPORT OF CO]II]IIITr££ 09^ KOMIKATIOP^S. 

To the Officers and Members of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association: 

Your Committee to whom was referred the matter of placing in nomination the 
names of persons to act as officers of this Association for the ensuing year, beg leave 
to report as follows : 

President — S. E. Allen, of Akron. 

First Vice President— M, D. Fulton, of Bucyrus. 

Second Vice President — Geo. W. Voss, of Cincinnati. 

Permanent Secretary — Lewis C. Hopp, of Cleveland. 

Permanent Treasurer — Chas. Huston, of Columbus. 

Executive Committee — Theodore Troupe, (Chairman) Springfield. 

C. T. Inman, Akron. 
C. P. Rendigs, Cincinnati. 

THOMAS JOHNSON, 
John Weyer, Secretary, Chairman, 

On motion, the report was accepted. 

The Secretary cast a ballot for the election of officers nominated as 
per motion. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 33 

The President appointed Mr. Phil Acker, Cleveland; H. J. Eady, 
Elyria; H. Boyer, Washington C. H., committee on time and place 
of next meeting. 

The Executive Committee reported no objections to the fifty-nine 

applicants for membership, whose names were read at the morning 

session. 

On motion, the Secretary cast an affirmative ballot for the applicants 

named, and the President declared them duly elected. 

The Executive Committee reported two applicants for membership. 

On motion, action was deferred until next session. 

The resignation of F. W. Seymour was read and, on motion, 
accepted. 

The Secretary read a communication from J. W. Colcord, Secretary 
Massachusetts Pharmaceutical Association. 

Lynn, Mass., May 31, 1887. 

In the days of Augustus a decree was issued from Rome- that all the world should 
be taxed, and that each must go annually to the city of his enrollment for this 
purpose. To the Pharmacist, as he makes his journey yearly to the Collector's 
office and deposits his $25, there seems to be little difference whether the decree 
issue from Rome or Washington, except that in the latter case it goes by favoritism 
and that he is one of the favored ones. 

In ancient times a tithe was considered excessive and burdensome, but now in 
many localities the Pharmacist is taxed 10 per cent, of his income by the local and 
national government for the privilege of supplying his customers with liquors for 
medicine only, and if to this we add municipal taxation^ it will double this percent- 
age. Such being the case, is it to be wondered at that the Pharmacist, finding 
himself so treated and classed, yields to the temptation to sell all he can in order to 
reimburse himself for the money of which he considers himself to have been unjustly 
deprived? Brethren, do we desire to continue to be longer classified as liquor 
dealers ? If not, how can we escape it ? W^ have, through cur local. State, 
and national Associations, passed condemnatory resolutions, and individually protested 
for years. Cut bono ? Have we not thrown grass long enough, and is it not time 
to begin throwing stones, i. e. : Working to accomplish it ? When our fathers had 
protested against the oppressive taxation of Great Britain till patience was exhausted, 
they at last took up arms. Shall not we ? Whenever we unitedly demand the 
repeal of this law, and back the demand in a proper and business-like manner, it 
can be done. Individual action being out of the question, and action by State 
Associations working singly, equally so, while the efforts of the late National Retail 
Druggists' Association having proved unavailing, what shall be done ? Who is there 
that believes that the American Pharmaceutical Association will do better by us 
even though re-organized ? Not one. Such being the case, I humbly submit a 



I 



34 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

plan, that if rightfully carried on, cannot fail to accomplish the desired object. 
First, let each State Association, through one of its committees, either the trade or 
executive, canvass its State by means of local agents,so that every proprietor will be 
seen personally if he be willing to subscribe one dollar toward this object, it beinj^ 
agreed that no money shall be called for until such time as an organization (that 
shall be provided for in a latter portion of this plan,) shall be effected; provided also* 
that no portion of subscription shall be used for any other purpose without the 
consent of subscribers, and no salaries paid. This work shall be done at the earliest 
practical moment and results noted. Whenever a sufficient number of States shall 
report favorably enough to warrant, each Association shall select one of its members 
to act as a committee for this purpose only. The committees of the several States 
shall promptly organize and proceed with the work. No money shall be expended 
without the consent of a proper committee, and no bills paid except as ordered by 
a finance committee. State Associations shall also select some influential member in 
each congressional district to call upon its member of Congress and urge the repeal. 
The statement has been repeatedly made that no funds were needed in this connection. 
Some of us, who have tried to get needed legislation in our State Legislatures, even 
wheire the welfare of the public was concerned, know the cost. How much greater 
will be the expense incurred where it is legislation for the relief of a special class 
and nationally. It is an axiom that governments seldom willingly relinquish an 
easily collectable revenue. As well might a commander say he could win battles 
without rations for his soldiers as for us to accomplish the repeal of this law without 
necessary funds. The time is passed when cities can be captured at the sound of 
the trumpet, or legislation secured simply by asking. It will be necessary for an 
able committee to make extended visits to Washington during the sessions, able 
counsel must be retained, petitions sent, circulars mailed, correspondence maintained, 
clerk hire paid, etc. Few retail Pharmacists are able to give of their time, let 
alone paying expenses, nor should they be asked to, where the benefits are to be 
shared equally by all. There is no question but that if this plan is entered into 
properly, it can be brought about within two years after organization. 

J. W. COLCORD. 

Will not Ohio join us in this greatly needed work ? Please bring before your 
Association and urge that they take action on it. 

On motion, communication was referred to committee who have 
report of Committee on Alcohol Tax, 

The Secretary suggested as a topic for consideration by the Asso- 
ciation of the use of 50 per cent, liquid preparations of vegetable drugs to 
take the place of Tinctures and Fluid Extracts now in use. Discussed 
by Hall, Rosewater, Spenzer and Hopp. 

Mr. Hopp— Mr. President, as one of the Pharmacopoeia Committee 
for the State of Ohio, I have no report to make. I intended to write 
a paper, but my time was taken up with other matters. I would 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 35 

like to bring up the subject of making a class of preparations to do 
avv^y entirely with Fluid Extracts and Tinctures — making them vf a 
fifty per cent, strength. A physician then desiring to prescribe fluid 
preparations of that kind, will prescribe according to the dose of 
the drug, and not prescribe a fluid extract dose for a tincture or a 
tincture dose for a fluid extract, which is occasionally done. I think 
a fifty per cent, solution will retain the active principles of any drug 
better than an hundred per cent. , which is the strength claimed for 
the fluid extracts. Most of the tinctures being ten per cent. , makes 
them very weak and expensive. I would like to bring out the ideas 
of some of the members, and probably we can form a committee of 
investigation and consideration to report at our next meeting. 

Mr. Hall — Mr. President, this is a subject I have not thought of 
before, but it strikes me that it would be a very good thing if it 
could be brought into general use. We receive prescriptions from 
New York, San Francisco, Baltimore, New Orleans, Germany, and 
elsewhere continually, and unless it could become general, we would 
have to carry a stock of tinctures and fluid extracts just the same. 
Still, of course, that stock would be limited. I think a fifty per cent, 
solution would be very nice indeed if it could be brought about. 
I think it would be better than the fluid extract, in many cases, and 
certainly it would be less expensive. 

Mr. Rosewater — Mr. President, in regard to making all prepara- 
tions uniform, 1 heartily agree with some that we ought to have 
preparations uniform^ but I think we have that just as well under 
the fluid extract as we would under the fifty per cent, solution. If it 
is fluid extract, we should all understand what it is if it is an hundred 
per cent, solution ; and if it is a fifty per cent, one, we should not 
confound it with an hundred per cent. one. But we find a lack of 
uniformity, and I think more so than in anything else, in our 
tinctures. We notice, for instance, that the tinctures that are being 
prescribed in this country are not of strength they are in Germany or 
in England, or in any other country, and there is no reason why 
uniformity in tinctures should not be established. For instance, we 
have a great many of eight and ten per cent, strength, and they 
vary between that and as high up as fifteen per cent. Once they 
were as high as fifty per cent. I don't know whether there are any 



36 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

fifty per cent, now or not ; I do not think so. But I looked into 
that subject once with a view of suggesting, at the time of the meeting 
of the committee for establishing a universal pharmacopoeia, that a 
plan should be adopted whereby tinctures should all be uniform, 
whether prescribed in this country or in any other country ; and in 
order to do that, I saw, on looking over those that we have in this 
country, that but a very few changes would be necessary, and those 
easy to be made. For instance, tincture of capsicum and tincture of 
cantharides are a little weaker than ten per cent. All countries that 
have a strength of preparations that is above ten per cent, might 
unite in decreasing the strength of such preparations, until in five or 
ten years, the standard of ten per cent, is reached. Those that have 
a preparation weaker than ten per cent, could increase the strength 
of such preparations year by year until ten per cent is reached. All 
preparations that now approach the standard — eight or nine per cent. 
— could be immediately brought to a ten per cent, strength. It 
would only be a short time until we could say that there was a 
universal standard of strength for all tinctures, and there would be 
no question as to what strength tincture of so-and-so has, any more 
than there is a question to-day as to what strength a fluid extract has. 
And this is as easy of application in this country as it would be in 
Germany, or England, or any other country, because with a gradation 
of five or ten years, preparations changed could be learned byphysicians. 
Again, if such a plan is adopted, we would look at an old prescrip- 
tion and see that it was prescribed in i860 or 1880, and immediately 
know the strength of the preparation at that time. It will give us a 
way of arriving at a direct connection between the strength of the 
past and the present. I think it would be a very simple method, 
and one that the Association could suggest and recommend to the 
American Pharmaceutical Association for adoption. 

Mr. Hopp — Yes, but that is not in reference to fluid extracts. 
Now, can every druggist make a fluid extract ? Can they be made as 
easily as a tincture? Representives of the manufacturing establishments 
come to you and say, **You can't make fluid extracts. You can't 
extract them according to the Pharmacopoeia. If you do, you must 
use heat; you must evaporate." The manufacturers say, ** We don't 
use heat. We extract the active principle without heat." Now, 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 37 

if the retailer cannot make these fluid extracts, he has to buy them, 
and the idea is for retailers to make them; and if they make a 
fifty per cent, solution, they can more easily extract the drug than 
make a fluid extract^ because they cannot make a fluid extract 
pound for pound. Not only that, but according to a paper by Prof. 
Lloyd and one or two others, fluid extracts change by tempera- 
tiu-e — heat and cold. 

Mr, Rosewater — Would it cost any more to make them ? 
Mr. Hopp — Not so much. 

Mr. Rosewater — If you have a fifty per cent, strength you must 
use twice as much Alcohol. 

Mr. Hopp — Not necessarily. The fluid extract itself has to be 
stronger in Alcoholic strength than fifty per cent, or ten 
per cent, mixtures, which are much easier to make. 

Mr, Rosewater — You would only be adding to the number of 
preparations. It is bad enough as it is. I think we should arrive 
at more simplicity. 

Dr. P. I. Spenzer — I believe that something over thirty years ago 
Tilden & Co., of New Lebanon, New York, introduced fluid extracts. 
When fluid extracts were first made, they were just about fifty per 
cent, strength. Soon some manufacturers followed who wanted to 
make fluid extracts cheaper, and they did, and some of them came 
down to about twenty-five per cent., and we find finally all strengths. 
Now, I think the present standard as adopted, an hundred per cent, 
fluid extract, is really the best plan, and I think if we stick to it, it will 
be well. As to the retail pharmacist manufacturing his own fluid 
extract, he can make it just as cheaply as the manufacturer; he can 
make just as good a fluid extract, and even lose his excess of Alcohol. 
Even if he loses double the amount of Alcohol, if he will figure it 
up, it don't cost him any more than what he buys, and he knows 
what he has. As far as heat is concerned, I suppose all know it 
does not require sufficient heat to destroy the drug to drive ofl" the 
Alcohol, and I think that to retain the present form is really better 
than to reduce its strength. 



38 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Mr. Fell read paper by J. G. Spenzer, M.D., of Cleveland, in 
answer to Query 20.* 

Paper by Jos. Fell in answer to Query 25.* 
Executive Committee reported eleven applicants for membership. 
Moved and seconded that the Association go in a body to the 
exhibition hall after meeting adjourns. Carried. 

On motion, adjourned until 10:15 Thursday morning. 

THIRD SESSION. Thursday, June p, 1887. 

On motion, minutes were approved as read. 

The eleven applicants for membership, whose names were read at a 
previous session, were on motion elected, the Secretary casting the 
ballot. 

The President appointed the following Committee on Pharmacy 
Board Vacancy : W. J. Martin, N. Rosewater and S. W. McKeown. 

REPORT OK C01II9IITTBB OBi TIBf £ AKD PLrACB. 

Mr, President and Gentlemen of the Convention : 

In view of the fact that the next annual meeting of this Association will be its 
tenth anniversary, and that the first meeting was held in Columbus, your Committee 
on time and place of next meeting would suggest the place of meeting be at the 
above named city, and time second Tuesday in June, 1888. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY BOYER, 

HENRY J. EADY, 
PHILIP ACKER. 
On motion, report was accepted. 

On motion, Columbus was chosen as the next meeting place. Time, 

second Tuesday in June, 1888. 

Mr. Weyer read report of Comniittee on President's Address. 

REPORT OK COnmilTTKB OK PRB8IDBBiT>8 ADDRB88. 

To the Officers and Members 'of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association : 

Your committee, to whom was referred the Address of the President, beg leave to 
report the following : 



^Discussions follow papers. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 39 

That in accordance with his recommendation the Treasurer be authorized to 
collect any unpaid dues through any banking institution. 

Your committee would hereby respectfully recommend that instead of entailing 
upon the Standing Committee on Papers and Queries, additional duties of that of 
Adulterations and Sophistications, as recommended by the President, that the 
By-Laws be so amended as to provide an additional committee for that especial 
purpose. 

As to his recommendation that a portion of the funds of the Association in the 
hands of the Treasurer, be set aside as a permanent fund, your committee would 
respectfully recommend that the funds held by the Treasurer are not sufficient to 
justify any action in this matter at present. 

Our President, having recommended the establishment of a life membership, your 
committee would refer the matter for discussion without recommendation. 

In regard to a yearly conference of State Secretaries in connection with the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, for the purpose of duscussing ways and 
means of conducting State Meetings, your committee declines to make any 
recommendation . 

With regard to recommendation for amendment of Art. 7, Chapter II, of our 
By-Laws, we recommend that it remain as it is. 

As to making an exhibit of different pharmaceutical preparations, made by any 
members of our Association, either pharmacists or assistants, meets with our hearty 
approval. Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN WEYER, 
JAS. H. CASE, 
M. D. FULTON. 

On motion, report was accepted. 

On motion, the following suggestions of the President were adopted: 

That the Treasurer be authorized to arrangement with some bank 
in Columbus for the collection of annual dues. 

That the Secretary attend the annual conferences of State Asso- 
ciation Secretaries at the meetings of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association, and that his traveling expenses for this year be paid 
by the Association. 

That a committee of five be appointed to solicit exhibits of phar- 
maceutical preparations made by members of the Association. 

The President appointed the following committee : H. C. Cook, 
Columbus; C. T. P. Fennel, Cincinnati; L. Sollmann, Cantoa; J. 
D. Lisle, M.D., Springfield; C. D. Kerr, Gallipolis. 

The Secretary read invitation from Michigan Pharmaceutical 
Association to attend its meeting at Petoskey, July 12, 13 and 14, 
1887, ^^d credentials of Dr. A. B. Lyons, of Detroit, and J. C. 



40 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Harper, of Milan, Michigan, delegates to the Ohio State Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

Dr. Lyons being present, privilege of the floor was extended him. 

Dr. Lyons addressed the meeting with a few remarks, and extended 
a hearty invitation to the members to attend the meeting of the 
Michigan Association. 

Mr. J. C. Harper, of Milan, Michigan arrived as the Association 
adjourned, and on account of sickness, was obliged to return before 
the next session. 

On motion of Mr. Hechler, the President appointed the following 
delegates to attend Michigan Association meeting : L. C. Hopp, 
Cleveland; S. E. Allen, Akron; F. H. Coblentz, Springfield. 

Mr. Feil read paper by Prof. J. U. Lloyd, entitled, "The Hand- 
Writing on the Wall." 

Prof. Lloyd — Mr. President, can I interrupt the order of business 
to introduce a resolution ? About forty years ago a gentleman came 
from Germany to the State of Ohio, and commenced a pharmaceutical 
business in the city of Cincinnati. He was well known at that time 
in our city, but many years ago moved to a Southern city, the city of 
Mobile. Since that time he has acquired a national and international 
reputation. He is known in Europe, perhaps, better than he is to- 
many in America. He is a man that we look up to and honor. I 
suppose that all pharmacists do. All, certainly, who have made his 
acquaintance. He is the man whom Prof. Maisch selected to 
review for the Journal of Pharmacy the "National Dispensatory," 
when it appeared. He was selected by the Confederate Government,, 
although his opinions were with the Northern people, to make their 
medicines for them during the War, and he did so. He is the maD 
— unassuming and talented — who was selected by our Gk)vernment 
to write up the trees and forests of the South for the last Census, and 
he did the work thoroughly. He then went to Washington to con- 
tinue that branch of work in the Agricultural Department, and he 
did that work. I have learned since I started for this meeting that 
this gentleman — and, by the way, his name is Dr. Charles Mohr, of 
Mobile, Alabama — is to sail for Europe to visit the Fatherland, 
within a few days, and I believe, gentlemen, that it would be a 
graceful act in us and a compliment to our Association to elect him 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



41 



to an honorary membership in our Association, and telegraph that 
fact to New York. I know it will be appreciated by him, and I 
know it will be appreciated abroad. I hereby introduce a resolution 
to that effect, trusting that it will be seconded. 

On motion of Prof. Lloyd, Dr. Charles Mohr was elected an 
honorary member. (See acceptance from Dr. Mohr). 

New York, June 18, 1887. 

Mr, Lewis Hopp^ Secretary Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association : 

My Dear Sir — Delayed by heavy storms during my trip by sea, I arrived here but 
a very short time before taking the steamer for Europe. Hence the delay in my 
acknowledgement of the receipt of your telegram I found on my arrival here at Dr. 
Hoffman's. Permit me to express by this the feeling of pleasure I experienced in 
finding myself at the last session of your body appointed an honorary member. 
Having shortly after my arrival in this country, found in your State the starting 
point of >my career in life, which led to my connection with our profession, and to 
those pursuits which have ever been the delight of my life, I feel naturally attached 
to Ohio, and for that I appreciate so much higher the honor which the Pharmaceutical 
Association of that State has conferred upon me. Believe me, with my sincere 
regards, fraternally yours, Charles Mohr. 

Mr. Cook read paper by Prof. C. T. P. Fennel, in answer to 
Query 28. 

Mr. McKeown read paper in answer to Query 33. 



REPORT OK AUDITING COM HHTTICH. 

To the Officers and Members of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association : 

Your committee appointed to examine the Treasurer's report, find the same 

correct. Respetfully submitted, 

G. L. HECHLER, 

JOS. I. BECK, 

M. D. FULTON. 

The Committee on Nominations reported the name of H. C. Cook, 
of Columbus, Local Secretary. 

On motion, the report was accepted, and the Secretary cast an 
affirmative ballot for his election. 

The following two amendments to the By-Laws were offered: 



42 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Resolvedy That Chapter V, Art i, of the By-Laws, be so amended as to provide 
an additional committee of three members,to be styled a Committee on Adulterations 
and Sophistications. 

[Signed] John Weykr, 

M. D. Fulton, 
J. H. Case. 

Resolved^ That Chapter II, Art. 8, be added to our By-Laws, which shall read as 

toUows: Active members of this Association in good standing for at least five years, 

may have issued to them by the Secretary a Certificate of Life Membership, upon 

the payment of ten dollars into the treasury of the Association. 

John Weyer, 

J. H. Case, 

M. D. Fulton. 

President — These will have to lay over until our next session. 

RKl*ORT OP COMIIIITTBB OK PHARHIACY BOARD 

VACANCY. 

Your committee beg leave to report the following names : 

J. A. NiPGEN, of Chillicothe. G. L. HECHLfeR, of Cleveland. 

M. D. Fulton, of Bucyrus. Phil Lehr, of Cleveland. 

C. N. Nye, of Canion. 



W. J. MARTIN, 
N. ROSEWATER, 
S. W. McKEOWN, J 

On motion, the report was adopted. 



-Committee. 



Extracts were read from paper prepared by E. H. W. Stahlhuth in 
answer to Query No. 32, and by John J. Buehler, Query No. 12. 

On motion^ adjourned till 2 p.m. 

FOURTH SESSION. Thursday^ June g, Aftemoan session. 

Minutes read and approved. 

Amendment to Chapter V, Art. i, By-Laws, adopted. 
Article 8 to Chapter II, of By-Laws, adopted. 
The following communication was received. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Nov. 30, 1886. 
The Public Library, of the city of Cincinnati, has received from Mr. Lewis C. 
Hopp, as a gift to the library, the book mentioned in the following schedule, for 
which the board of managers return their sincere thanks. 

George Ewing, President^ 
W. W. Whelpley, Librarian. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 43 

Proceedings of the Ohio State Pharmaceatical Association, at its eighth annual 
meeting held in Springfield, June, 1886. 

Mr. Voss moved that the salaries of the Treasurer and Secretary 
be paid, and that they be authorized to draw on the treasury for the 
amount. Seconded and carried. 

The Secretary read the report of the committee appointed to con- 
sider the report of the Committee on Tax on Alcohol. 



RKPORT OP COIHIIIITTKK OBI TAX OBI AI«COIIOI«, 

To the President and Members of the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association : 

After due deliberation your committee desire to recommend the adoption of the 
changes in the Dow Law as recommended by Mr. Wells, and that it would be well 
for our State Association to co-operate with other State Associations in following out 
the plan as suggested by Mr. J. W. Colcord, to secure legislation to have the national 
tax on Alcohol removed. W. J. MARTIN, 

G. L. HECHLER. 

On motion, the President appointed a committee of five to take the 
matter in charge. 

Committee : Wells, Hechler, Hall, McClain and Arnold. 

Mr. Feil read the following papers (by title.) 

W. Simonson, of Cincinnati, in answer to Query 34. 

S. W. McKeown, of Youngstown, Query 14. 

E. Goodman, of Cincinnati, Query 14. 

Also paper on Ethel Nitrite, by J. Geo. Spenzer. 

A. Thurston, of Grand Rapids, O., in answer to Query 15. 

Mr. Feil — I move that a vote of thanks be given to all the members 
who have furnished papers here, and a special vote of thanks to Mr. 
J. George Spenzer, who has furnished us two very interesting papers, 
and'who is not a member, and that ten copies of the Proceedings be 
given to him. Seconded and carried. 

A discussion of the ** Dow Law" being suggested, Mr. Weyer was 
requested to speak on the subject, and said : 

Mr. Weyer — Mr. President, I hardly know what to say on that 
matter. I don't know that there is anything in it that particularly 
interests pharmacists, except the clause limiting the sale of liquors by 



44 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

the pharmacist, and that is embodied in a very few words . He may 
sell upon the prescriptions of physicians in good standing — reputable 
physicians — made in good faith ; that is, when the prescription is 
written for a case of necessity, the same as he would write any 
other prescription. It must be in good faith, and by a reputable 
physician. Then, in addition to that, he is permitted to sell liquors 
for mechanical, pharmaceutical and sacramental purposes. ** For 
mechanical purposes," I take it, means, perhaps, to the painter who 
desires to dissolve shellac, or for such purposes as that. " For phar- 
maceutical purposes," I take it, was intended for the wholesale 
dealer, that he may sell to the retailer. The retail druggist scarcely 
ever sells to any person else for pharmaceutical purposes. He is not 
permitted to sell for medicinal purposes at all except on the prescrip- 
tion of a physician. There is no need of our attempting to construe 
** pharmaceutical purposes" to mean that we can sell to our customers 
as we please. If we sell **for sacramental purposes," of course it is 
expected that we thoroughly understand or are satisfied that it is to 
be used for that purpose in wines. We long ago discussed this 
matter in our Society in Cincinnati, and decided clearly in our own 
minds that if we wanted to sell liquors except on physicians' 
prescriptions, we must pay the tax. 

Mr. Hechler — Mr. Chairman, I do not entirely agree with friend 
Weyer, of Cincinnati, in regard to the meaning of "pharmaceutical." 
The law does not in any way state that that applies to wholesale 
houses. * 'Pharmaceutical" relates to the preparing, preserving and 
compounding of medicines. Now, I do not believe, in the first 
place, that the Dow Law was intended to affect legitimate druggists 
and pharmacists in the sale of liquor to parties that wish to use it for 
medicinal purposes, although it specifies medicinal only on prescrip- 
tions of regular practicing physicians. Suppose some one comes into 
the store and wishes to buy fifteen cents' worth of rye whiskey and 
five cents' worth of camphor. Do you suppose for a minute that the 
pharmacist, under the Dow Law, has no right to sell them ? I should 
sell them, and I think we have a perfect right to do so. Do you 
suppose that this Dow Law can compel people to go into saloons ? 
Do you suppose it was intended by the Dow J^aw to provide that 
people who do not wish to go into saloons, who wish to buy their 



OBIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 45 

liquor in a proper place, where they, can be confident that they are 
getting pure liquor, cannot go in a drug store to buy their liquor 
without the druggist being obliged to pay two hundred dollars 
annually for a license, when, in many instances, he does not sell that 
much liquor through the year? I think the law intended that 
pharmacists should have the privilege of selling it for legitimate 
purposes. 

Mr. Case — Mr. President, I would like to ask a question. If a 
person has consumption, and is in such a condition that he cannot 
take a bath without liability of taking cold unless he added Alcohol 
to the water, and should send to the store for Alcohol for that 
purpose, would the druggist be allowed to sell it to him without a 
prescription ? 

The President — Following the law strictly, I do not think he would. 

Mr. Case — I refused a case of that kind last night without a 
prescription. At the same time, I do not think it a proper thing to 
do— a poor person suffering and wanting to take a bath. 

The President — It seems that the law does not allow you to make 
any distinction. 

A Member — Was this an internal or external bath ? 

Mr. Case — External. This is not an exaggerated case at all. I 
wish to ask another question. Has a druggist a right to sell cologne 
or bay rum without being liable to the Dow tax ? 

The President — Cologne would be a pharmacopoeial preparation. 

Mr. Case — That may be. I asked the question of our local 
Judge here some time ago, when there was a party around attempting 
to catch the druggists of Akron — and he did catch some, I believe. 
I went to the Judge and asked him if he could explain to me at 
what time whiskey became whiskey and at what time it ceased to be 
whiskey and became medicine. He said he could not ; I would 
have to use my own judgment. He could not give me any answer 
whatever to it. Parties come to vour store sometimes and want 
quinine and whiskey ; they want it bad — not because they are in the 
habit of using it, but because they do not wish to go and ask a 
physician for a prescription and pay half a dollar for it. Has a 
druggist a right to prepare for a man a bottle of whiskey and quinine i 
he thinks he is not using it as a beverage but medicinally ? 



46 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Mr. Weyer — Mr. President, I have not the slightest idea but that 
when the law was framed it was intended to give the druggist certain 
privileges ; but the wording of it is unfortunate in that respect, and 
it does not cover his case at all. As to quinine being added to 
whiskey, it is my opinion that* when whiskey is used and sufficient 
additional ingredients are added to make it distinctly a medicinal 
article, it would not properly come under the Dow Law. It must 
be distinctly a medicinal article. For instance, a man came into my 
store about a month ago and asked me for a quantity of whiskey. 
I told him I could not sell it except on a physician's prescription. 
**Well," he said, **I want it to make a cough mixture." I said, 
**What do you want to make?" He said, **Iwant to take equal 
parts of whiskey, glycerine and honey." "Well," I said, **I will 
make you a cough mixture." I made him up a pint of equal parts of 
whiskey, glycerine and honey, and labelled it on the bottle, and sold 
it to him. 

Mr. L. W. Smith — I have had this come under my notice : Some- 
times a prescription is made for a pint of whiskey, and the party will 
say, **I only want a couple of ounces on the prescription, and I will 
call for it again." Would I be violating that law to fill that at 
another time, the prescription being left in my care ? 

Mr. Lewis — If a consumptive, for instance, with such a prescription 
was poor and had to use whiskey right along, and I knew that he 
would need it right along, would I be justified in refilling said 
prescription for him ? 

Mr. Weyer — I think the physician could write on his prescription, 
**To be refilled." I think that would be the proper way to do in all 
those cases. 

The President — Or the patient might retain the prescription and 
present it each time he wanted it filled. 

Mr. Hechler — Suppose a person should ask you for Alchol, saying 
he wished it for mechanical purposes ? Suppose he wanted it for 
some secret process ?. 

Mr. Weyer — I would have him sign a certificate. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 47 

Mr. Hechler — So would I, and with a witness. For instance, if he 
wanted to put it in a barrel of cider, I think that by having him 
sign with a competent witness you could sell it. 

Mr. Case — A painter who lived in our ward came to our store at 
one time with a pint bottle, with shellac in the bottle. He wanted a 
pint of Alcohol to put in that shellac for the purpose of making 
shellac varnish to varnish knots in his painting. I filled the bottle 
with a pint of Alcohol. He had his sleeves rolled up and was 
sweating, and he took that outside of the store and commenced to 
use it up as whiskey, although shellac gum was in it. Now, I want 
to know if I violated the law. (Laughter.) 

Mr. Miller — Mr. President, I have gone to some expense to get an 
answer to some of these questions. It has cost me a hundred dollars. 
(Laughter.) I was on that Committee, and I asked the Prosecuting 
Attorney of our county some questions in writing, and he answered 
them. I think Mr. Wells has those questions ; they have not been 
returned to me. We have adopted a form of certificate down in our 
county which answers our purpose, and I will pin a copy of it upon 
the wall. 

/ hereby certify that this day I bought of 
C. M. MILLER, Druggist, 

Exclusively for Mechanicaly Pharmaceutical or 
Sacramental purposes, 

Mansfield^ OhiOy , j88. . 

Mansfield, O., April 19, 1887. 
H. E, Bellf Attorney: 

Dear Sir — I submit herewith a printed slip, as a part of this inquiry, and request 
your opinion in writing as to the following propositions: 

1. As to Section 8 of an act entitled, **An act providing against the evils result- 
ing from the sale of intoxicating liquors." 

What is a fair and full construction of said section as pertaining to the business of 
drugs and prescriptions? 

2. If a party purchasing liquors other than on prescription of a regular physician 
represents the use to be either mechanical, pharmaceutical or sacramental purposes 
and signs this slip, erasing the two purposes not represented, which slip is retained 
by the druggist, what in your opinion is the liability of the dealer and purchaser, or 
either of them, in the light of said Section 8 ? 

Yours truly, Chas. M. Miller. 



48 OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

To C, M, Miller y Dru^st, Mansfield, O,: 

Sir — You submit herewith an inquiry in writing, with printed slip^ asking my 
opinion as to two stated propostions relative to the Dow Liquor Tax Law and Section 8 
of the same, 

I understand, upon a careful examination of said Section 8^ that the term 
trafficking in intoxicating Liquors, would be construed to mean and include any and 
all sales by retail, of Liquors, except Vi-^n prescription issued in good faith by reputable 
physician in active practice. However, the same section authorizes sales for 
*•* exclusively known mechanical, pharmaceutical and scuramental purposes" 

I understand the word known to imply actual knowledge of such purpose at the 
time of sale. I think it but reasonable to conclude that, such knowledge which the 
law seems to require of dealers, can only be acquired by inquiry directed to the 
purchaser. For instance, a purchaser names one of the three purposes, to- wit: 
mechanical, pharmaceutical or sacramental, apparently in good faith, when perhaps it 
may be in fraud and intentional evasion of the law; an inquiry in good faith by the 
dealer of the purchaser, is in many cases the only means and source of information 
within the power of the dealer as to the purpose contemplated. I surmise the 
purpose of the printed slip or receipt, is, in all cases where goods are sold for either 
of said purposes, and not on prescription. That the purchaser signs the same as an 
evidence of good faith and purpose; and you inquire the protection, if any, the 
dealer would have from prosecution for violation of the law if the actual purpose 
was other than stated in the slip or receipt. 

Assuming the foregoing to be a correct surmise of your inquiry, I will say that if 
a purchaser makes such request, in the form of the printed certificate, erasing two, 
and leaving one of the purposes as that for which the goods are to be used, and 
signing the same delivers it, and the dealer retains the same and makes the sale in 
good faith, it is my opinion that in such case, and in every absence of fraud and 
purpose of evasion which the term good faith would imply, on the part of the 
dealer, that the dealer would be absolved from liability for a violation of said Sec- 
tion 8, and would not come within a violation of the provisions of the same, as, in 
my opinion, he acts upon such knowledge of the purpose for which the goods are 
obtained, as is within his power, and in the full exercise of good faith. And as to 
the liability of the purchaser in such case, I am clearly of the opinion that the 
purchaser would, under such circumstances, by reason of such fraudulent purchase 
and representation to the dealer, and such flagrant violation and evasion of ^aid 
Section 8, come within the violation of the provisions of said Section 8, and be 
liable to prosecution under the laws of Ohio, in such case made and provided. 

I am very truly yours, 

H. E. BELL, Attorney, Mansfield, Ohio. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 49 

REPORT OP COIHIIIITTEE OK PRICES. 

Afr, President: 

Your committee beg leave to report the awarding of prizes, after a careful 

examination of the papers presented, as follows: 

Query No. 14 is entitled to first prize; No. 28 is entitled to second prize; No. 32 

is entitled to third prize. 

N. ROSEWATER, 

JOHN WEYER, 

J. I. BECK. 

Report of Committee on Prizes accepted. 

Messrs. Wahmhoff and Weyer were appointed a committee to escort 
the newly-elected President to the chair. 

Mr. Allen — Gentlemen, I thank you very kindly for the honor 
which you have conferred upon me, and I think that I am doubly 
under obligations to your committee and to you all, for the reason it 
is an honor which I have not sought myself. I had never asked for it, 
and when some of my friends came to me and asked me to take it, I 
said '*No, I prefer that somebody else should have it." And now 
that I have been nominated and elected to the office, I feel that I 
am doubly under obligations. Again, gentlemen, I thank you for the 
honor. (Applause.) 

Prof. Coblentz — Gentlemen of the Association, I desire in turn to 
thank you for your kind attention, the promptness with which you 
have assisted in the conducting of business, and for the many 
courtesies and kindnesses received from both members and officers of 
the Association. I shall always remember the Ohio State Association 
wherever I may be, and I hope that you will have the success in the 
future that you have had in the past. (Applause.) 

Mr. Hechler — Mr. Chairman, I wish to make a motion to extend 
our hearty thanks to our retiring President for the courteous treatment 
extended by him to all members of this Association. Motion 
seconded and carried. 

Eleven members elected. 

Moved and seconded that a vote of thanks be tendered to the 
Local Secretary for his efficient work during the past year. Carried. 



50 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

* 

Mr. Voss moved a vote of thanks to the druggists of Akron, to the 
press, and to the city government for the use of the Council Chamber. 
Seconded and carried. • 

The Secretary presented a bill for legal services paid by Mr. Miller, 
and moved that the same be allowed, and that the Treasurer be 
authorized to pay the amount to Mr. Miller. Seconded and carried- 

Mr. Miller moved that the correspondence between the Committee 
on Legislation and the Prosecuting Attorney of RicKland county, be 
printed and a copy mailed to every member of the Association. 

Mr. Fulton moved as an amendment that the correspondence 
referred to be printed in the Proceedings. 

Amendment accepted, seconded and carried. 

President Allen announced the following Standing Committees. 

Trade Interests. — C. B. Johnson, Middletown ; M. H. McClain, 
Galion; W. J. Walding, Toledo. 

Papers and Queries, — Joseph Feil, Cleveland; W. Simonson, Cin- 
cinnati; J. I. Beck, Springfield. 

Reporter on Progress of Pharmacy, — S. W. McKeown, Youngstown. 

Pharmacy Laws, — G. L. Hechler, Cleveland ; J. A. Nipgen, Chilli- 
cothe; Chas. Huston, Columbus; J. H. Wahmhoff, Delphos; W. J. 
Martin, Cincinnati. 

Unofficinal Formula. — Lewis C. Hopp, Cleveland; E. Goodman, 
Cincinnati; H. C. Cook, Columbus; F. T. Bower, Toledo; J. C. 
Bolger, Salem. 

Adulterations and Sophistications, — ^Joseph Feil, Cleveland; J. U. 
Lloyd, Cincinnati ; F. T. Bower, Toledo. 

The Secretary read resignation of Prof. Coblentz as a member of 
the Committee on Revision of the Pharmacopoeia. 

Mr. Cook moved that the Association accept the resignation with 
regret. Seconded and carried. 

The President appointed Mr. Huston to fill the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Prof. Coblentz. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 5 1 

R£PORX OF COMMIXXHC: 029 EXHIBITS. 

The following is a complete list of exhibitors : 

Benton, Myers & Co., Cleveland, O. — Sponges and Chamois Skins. Represented 
by W. G. Hornsby. 

Duroy Wine Co., Cleveland, O. — Pure Native Wines. Represented by E. J. 
Haines. 

Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. — Chemicals, Fluid Extracts, and Crude 
Drugs. Represented by W. K. Walkemnd J. H. Bellerman. 

F. H. Steams & Co., Detroit, Mich. — Non-secret Remedies and Pharmaceutical 
Preparations. Represented by A. Hitchman. 

John Wyeth & Bro., Philadelphia, Pa. — Fluid Extracts, Compressed Tablets, 
Elixirs, etc. Represented by J. C. Ballard. 

Burrough Bros. Mfg. Co., Baltimore, Md. — Exclusive Manufacturers of Fluid 
Extracts, Represented by W. L. Hooflf. 

Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. — Complete Line of Pharmaceutical Prepara' 
tions. Represented by A. J. Wallis. 

The Upjohn Pill & Granule Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. — Soft Coated Pi Is and 
Granules. Represented by H. S. Mead. 

Wm. S. Merrell Chemical Co., Cincinnati, O. — Chemicals, Fluid Extracts, etc 
Represented by H. Skellman. 

Seabury & Johnson, New York and London. — Surgical Plasters, Antiseptic 
Absorbents and Dressings. Represented by C. N. Raymond, M.D. 

Foote & Jenks, Jackson Mich. — Perfumes. Represented by C. S. Peyton and C. 
C. Jenks. 

McKesson & Robbins, New York, N. Y. — Pills. Represented by James Bennett. 

Graham Bros. & Co., Chicago, 111. — Peifumers and Manufacturers of Fine Toilet 
Soaps. Represented by W. S. Howarth. 

Eastman & Bro., Philadelphia, Pa. — Perfumery, Toilet Soaps, etc. Represented 
by W. R. Jewett. 

J. M. Portuando & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. — Cuban Hand Made Cigars. Repre- 
sented by J. S. Crombarger. 

W. S. Torsion Balance and Scale Co., Cincinnati, O. — Manufacturers of Drug- 
gists' Scales. Represented by A. L. Gallaher. 

A. C. Brown, Canton, O. — Druggists* Glassware. Represented by A. C. Brown. 

King Varnish Co., Akron, O. — Fine Coach and Furniture Varnish. Represented 
by A. M. Armstrong. 

E. W. Hoyt & Co., Lowell, Mass. — Rubifoam and German Cologne. Represented 
by L. E. Smith. 

National Cash Register Co., Canton, O. — Manufacturers of Cash Registers. 
Represented by J. H. Crane. 

H. W. Stetcher, Cleveland, O.— Sticky Fly Paper. Represented by H. W. 
Stecher. 



52 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Bradley & Smith, New Haven, Conn. ~ Cigar Cases. Represented by J. S. 
Crombarger. 

Hamel & Weidersheim, Philadelphia, Pa. — Flavoring Extracts. Represented by 
J. S. Crombarger. 

St. John Sewing Machine Co., Springfield, O. — Ice Shaver. Represented by W. 
B. Dix. 

Mai to Mfg. Co., Cleveland, O. — Manufacturers of Malto. Represented by Chas. 
Miller. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN GRETHER. 

On motion, the Association adjourned to meet in Columbus, O., 
the second Tuesday, June 12, 1888. 

Lewis C. Hop?, Permanent Secretary. 



List of Queries 

To BE Answered at the Tenth Annual Meeting, 

To be held In Columbus; 0., June 12. 1888. 

1. Are the assayed Fluid Extracts of manufacturers true to the strengths claimed ? 

2. Is Cochin Ginger more valuable for pharmaceutical uses than Jamaica Ginger ? 

3. Examine the Hypophosphites of the market for impurities and percentage of 

Hypophosphite in each salt. 

■ 

4. What tests distinguish certainly between the volatile oil of Betula Lenta and 

Oil of Wintergreen, for which the former is said to be substituted frequently ? 

5. Is it justifiable to dispense Aqua Amygdale Amarse when Aqua Lauro-cerasi 

is ordered by the physician ? 

6. Examine the Pancreatins of the market and report as to purity, etc. 

7. Does Hydrocyanic Acid of the present U. S. P. process keep better than a 

two per cent, aqueous solution under the same conditions ? 

8. Hydrastin has been proven to be the chief proximate principle of Hydrastis 

canadensis; devise an assay process by which its percentage in the drug may 
be accurately determined. 

9. Is Laudanum now made by the U. S. P. '80 formula; that is, will it assay 

between 1.2 and 1.6 per cent. Morphine? 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 53 

10. What is the condition of the present market on powdered Rhubarb? 

11. Examine and report upon the Concentrated Liquors for preparing certain 

Officinal Syrups; should they be used for the purpose recommended ? 

12. What Ferrous Salt may with advantage replace Ferrous Lactate in preparing 

Syrupus Hypophosphitum cum Ferro ? 

13. It has been stated that Caustic Potash and Soda cannot easily be made of 90 

per cent, purity strength required by the U. S. P. ; is this true, and what is 
the percentage of pure Alkali in commercial specimens of both ? 

14. Is Dialyzed Iron antidotal to arsenious or arsenic compounds ? If so, what is 

its value as compared with Ferric Hydrate and with Ferric Hydrate with 
Magnesia ? 

15. Is the Chromate or Oxalate Quinine test more valuable than Kemer's ? 

16. Examine the Calamines of commerce. 

17. Is the Hubbuck's English Zinc Oxide sold at a high price more valuable for 

making the Zinc Oxide Ointment than that usually sold by wholesale 
druggists ? 

18. . Commercial Glycerine is now obtained from two sources: vegetable oils and 

animal fats; is that from the former source superior to that from the latter ? 

19. What is the best process for making Syrup of Calcium Lactophosphate ? 

20. Analyze and give proximate formulae for Bromo-Chloralum, Piatt's Chlorides, 

and other popular disinfectants. 

21. What is the amount of Ash present in the U. S. P. and in the Alum Prcipi- 

tated Podophyllins of the market; is there enough Alum or Alumin^^ Salts 
present in the last named to be injurious ? 

22. Examine the various brands of Condensed Milk. 

23 Examine the Potassium Chlorate of the market for Chloride and other impurities. 

24. Old specimens of Fowler's Solution are often nearly free from Arsenous Acid; 

what changes take place in this preparation by time, and under what con- 
ditions is it best stored ? 

25. Do brands of Commercial Citrate of Caflfeine differ in the percentage of 

Caffeine ? 

26. What is the composition of ''Solution of Bromide of Arsenic" sold under 

various names and used extensively in some sections ? does it contain true 
Arsenious Bromide (As. Brs ) ? 



54 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

27. Can water clarified by Alum be employed for Pharmaceutical uses ? 

28. What is the best method of eliminating the Oil from the Seeds of Strychnos 

Nux Vomica, so that the Alcoholic Extract may be powdered ? 

29. What are the most suitable excipients for Calomel, Corrosive Sublimate and 

other Mercury Salts ? Which produces the least change in the contained 
chemical after the mass has been long made ? 

30. Distilled water: how long can it be kept pure ? would it not be better to use 

filtered river water than Distilled Water that has been on hand for some 
time ? 

31 . Carbonate of Magnesium is much used in clarifying mixtures obtained in 

making Syrups and Wines from Tinctures and Fluid Extracts; can it be 
used safely if the mixture represent an Alkaloidal Drug, as Coca, Pilocarpus 
or Ipecac ? 

32. Dilute Phosphoric Acid is said to be made from the Glacial Acid by some 

manufacturers; can this be proven, and is it advisable to be thus prepared^ 

33. Chlorine Water: at what rate does decomposition proceed ? Data are wanted 

as to its keeping qualities under varying conditions. 

34. Can Wood Alcohol be used in place of Ethyl Alcohol in making solid extracts 

and other preparations from which the solvent is expelled ? What are its 
solvent powers as compared with the latter, in extracting Alkaloidal Drugs, 
as Nux Vomica, Ipecac, Belladonna, and others ? 

35 It is claimed that many Wines of Coca are made from Wine and a Cocaine 
Salt flavored with a small quantity of Fluid Extract Coca Leaves; can this 
be proven, and is it desirable to have this preparation made in this manner ? 

36. Devise a practicable formula for a liquid preparation of Granatum to replace 

the decoction, which shall be free from Tannin or other objectionable 
proximate principle of the drug. 

37. Non-secrets: Is it justifiable or advisable to sell those which are colorable 

imitations of proprietary medicines ? 

38. Specific gravities of Aqueous Solutions of Ammonia of certain strengths are 

given differently by authorities usually quoted; what are the true specific 
gravities of 10 per cent, and 28 per cent. Aqueous Ammonia at 4°C,at I5°C 
and at 25°C, the standard for comparison being water at 4^C and the 
sameati5°C? 

39. At what rate does Iodine disappear in Tincture of Iodine when kept under 

conditions most favorable to its preservation ? 

40. Is Ethyl Sulphuric Acid found in the officinal Aromatic Sulphuric Acid, either 

at the time of making or when long stored ? 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. $ 5 

41. What is the quality of Chloroform and PuriHed Chloroform of the present 

market supply ? 

42. What are the comparative values of Russian and Chinese Cantharides, based 

upon percentage of Cantharidin ? Should the latter be used in making 
officinal preparations of Cantharides ? 

43. It has been stated that Conium fruits occur invariably in Italian Anise; an 

examination of commercial Anise for this contamination is desirable. 

44. How does solution of Bimeconate of Morphine compare in strength with 

Tincture of Opium of the present standard ? 

45. Is Lead Plaster made from Cotton Seed or Lard Oil as good as that made 

from Olive Oil ? 

46. Test commercial Phosphoric Acid, U. S. P. for impurities and for percentage 

of absolute Phosphoric Acid Hs PO.4 

47. What is the composition of commercial Calcium Lactophosphate, and is it 

suited for making the Syrup ? 

48. What syrups may, and what may not, be made advantageously by percolation ? 

49. What are the relative merits of proposed methods for making Diachylon Oint- 

ment ? Which give a product of best keeping qualities ? 

50. What syrups of the U. S. P. not now made from Fluid Extracts, can best be 

made in this manner ? 



THE HANDWRITING ON THE WALL. 

BY J. U. LLOYD, 
Cincinnati, O. 



Gentlemen — The object of this paper is, I believe, of importance. 
We of the present are interested — those who are to follow, members 
of our profession — must be more interested. To me the handwriting 
is distinct and the letters are plain. There is no longer a doubt 
regarding their character, and I think that most persons will agree 
with the spirit of my paper even if differing on certain features of it. 
It matters not whether the handwriting is as we wish it, or is in 
substance as we would prefer it, there it stands and boldly stares at us. 
Before proceeding I would call to your attention that my own 



56 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

pharmacy is the result of empiricism, and that when I refer to 
empiricists in pharmacy, I include myself and others who have stumbled 
into the profession by irregular labors and interrupted, unsystematic, 
laborious study. I will not here attempt to argue the final possible 
result of such labor, but simply state that we have had to do a large 
amount of work that under proper guidance is perhaps unnecessary.* 

In this regard most of us stand together. We are, as a rule, phar- 
macists with high opinions of the olden time and former methods. 
We commenced our labors as apprentices or errand boys; we 
struggled at first with window washing, mortar and graduate cleaning, 
and perhaps scrubbing the floor. Then we were permitted to learn 
the weights and measures; to occasionally triturate a mixture in a 
mortar; to replace bottles after our employers had used them in 
compounding a prescription, and afterward to even Mng him shelf 
bottles to obtain his medicines from, as we watched him fill a pre- 
scription. Thus we passed . gradually to the weighing of these 
substances under the eye of our preceptor, the folding and dividing 
of powders, the measuring of liquids after our employer was sure we 
could read that particular prescription, and so on to filling prescrip- 
tions ; few of ushad the advantage ot a College of Pharmacy education. 

Am I not right — have we not severally felt the pride of being for 
the first time left alone in the store ? To me it seems that the proudest 
day of my life was that on which my employer, (bless him, still one 
of the worthy members of this Society,) gave me charge of his store 
while he left for an entire afternoon. This is the way we learned the 
business, and in my opinion it is yet the only way to learn a certain 
part of it.. However, those of us who thus reached a creditable 
position in our profession are confronted with the fact, for fact it is, 
the past is not the present. 

Once we made our own pills, plasters, tinctures, syrups ; there were 
but few fluid extracts and no elixirs. Elegant pharmacy was unknown. 
Now the plaster iron is nearly as great a curiosity as a hand spinning 
wheel or the old tin lantern. We purchase our pills ready made and 

*At the present day, those of the younger generation, even if not convenient to one of the 
teaching institutions, can avail themselves of the excellent series of lectures issued by C. S. Halberg, 
of the National Institute of Pharmacy, Chicago. This is a superior series of papers and I study 
each lesson as it appears, with interest and advantage, and commend the set to my professional 
friends. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 57 

in bottles; our fluid extracts are supplied to many of us without more 
trouble than the extracting of a cork ; tinctures and syrups are more 
or less obsolete, being replaced by pharmaceuticals that are perhaps 
not made by pharmacists. Are the^e not facts ? Do I overestimate 
when I say twenty years only has thus . altered our busi- 
ness and our business methods? We have striven to repel 
the invasion, we have resented each innovation, we have attempted 
to devise methods whereby pharmacists could continue in the beaten 
path, but I am now of the opinion that we have been combatting the 
Inevitable. Do we lament this change ? It matters not if we do. 
Shall we sour upon the word and make it unpleasant for others because 
of changes that happen in a world where is all change ? What benefit 
follows? The tide is moving into new channels — we must either 
move with it or drown. A fish will drown in water if the current is 
swift and the fish is forced to stand still and face it. Growling will 
not help us. Whether we like the weather or not, we must meet it, 
and unless we do meet the changes in methods we will suffer. Have 
we not examples of honorable and persistent men holding on to olden 
times, and do we not in every old city note the result ? We may 
crawl into an old-style store ; we may keep a jar of snakes and lizards 
in our front window ; we may thrust at each physician that pharmacy 
is degenerating, and we may growl at the condition of affairs as 
compared with the olden time. Our former patrons will one by one 
move away; the aged physician will die; the modern physician 
will propose to administer what he pleases, as he pleases; the modern 
patron will insist upon getting medicines where there is sunlight and 
pleasant words ; where perfumery, stationery, and cigars are sold, if 
you please, and even candy. Thus we will become a relic of a former 
period, and our families will suffer, perhaps, because we refuse to 
learn that the world will not walk backward in the path our preceptor 
did. • These lessons are overy-day ones and painful, too. Struggle 
as we may, such facts are incontrovertible. Finally, we will become 
sour and crabbed and either snarl at a few who care nothing for us 
and irritate, by smiling at us, or will give up the business in disgust. 
Then our lizards and musty herbs, our snakes and old style ointment 
j^s will be carted to the dump and a man of the present, (perhaps 
not a pharmacist, but employing one,) will paint the store and 



58 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

modernize the fixtures ; will invite the sunlight and the people. A 
new business will then appear, and patrons will occasionally smile as 
they speak of the peculiar old pharmacist who refused to move on, 
whom the ladies shunned, the children shuddered at, the men passed 
by and physicians detested. 

Doubtless the majority of us will modernize ourselves under the 
pressure of circumstances, and accept the good old Baptist doctrine 
of **what is to De will be," and move on with the throng; but 1 
suspect that each locality will have its relic. To me there is some- 
thing touching in this isolated, quaint and persistent man who refuses 
to read the handwriting, covers his face at the present, turns his back 
to the future and lives in the past. I view him as a man of opinions 
and a man of courage ; a man who dares to do what he believes to 
be right and perhaps suffers to maintain the standing of his profession 
as he views the matter and uphold the name pharmacist where there 
are, as he believes, so few pharmacists. Do not doubt his honesty ; 
do not doubt his motives ; he is very sincere, and if you will become 
acquainted with him you will find that from his store of knowledge 
there is much to learn that you cannot get elsewhere, and you will 
find him far from being as cross and petulant as the world believes 
him to be. Perhaps he is not even sad, for he may carry in mind the 
prosperous pharmacy days of former years and review them with 
pleasure. He may not be companionless ; more than one aged friend 
will be found to spend hours in his dingy shop, and together they 
enjoy themselves with few interruptions. In his family he will be 
found undoubtedly loved, perhaps deemed peculiar but nothing more, 
and it may be that you will find that his shop is his recreation and • 
that he enjoys the apparent misery of his d^n. You may find that it 
would be fatal to disturb him. 

Perhaps some persons may think that I have pictured an ideal 
figure, but others will refer to some character who may be faithfully 
portrayed. Not one city, but all that* are of any age, have these 
connecting links between the past and the future ; not one such man 
exists alone, there are many. 

We look at this picture of the old, old time and forget ourselves. 
We think that we learned the modern part of the profession of . 
pharmacy, and forget that history repeats itself and that the hand is 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 59 

Still writing as in the past ; that the years fly swiftly. We think that 
only the old-style pharmacist can be obsolete, and at the same time we 
unconsciously growl at the innovations of the young generation. We 
oppose the * 'new-fangled notions," and we may combat the new ideas 
of pharmaceutical education and compare them with the day we were 
apprentices. Some of us may oppose college learning and condemn 
the fact that pharmaceutical journals thrive and multiply, referring to 
the time when in our younger days one journal issued every two 
months was sufficient for the country, and but two colleges of 
pharmacy struggled for existence. We may even sneer at the term 
Ph.D. and Ph.G., and begin to travel in the old, old path that 
leads to growling at everything modern, and eventually to an isolation 
where we will serve the coming generation as a zoological specin^n, 
perhaps doing good in an educational manner as exhibiting the 
difference between the pharmacist of the past and of the present. 

I would not have any one think that this is written as a trivial 
matter. It is not. I am not disposed to make light of such facts, 
and in my description I have endeavored to confine myself to what 
I view as facts. I would not thrust a pin into myself, as I really do, 
when I thfnk of the progress (?) in directions that rub against the 
grain, because, it is painful to the flesh. It is necessary, though, I 
think, that we should look at ourselves occasionally, and I ask "if we 
are not traveling the beaten road ? Do we not criticise the present 
method of filling our stores with sugar-coated pills, with gelatine- 
coated pills and capsules ? Do we not often oppose the ready-made 
plaster and lament the days so recently passed away when pharmacists 
were pharmacists? And do we not sometimes attempt to devise 
methods whereby the hands of Time may be turned backward and 
the old styles detained ? Do we not think of the time when a few 
officinal tinctures and syrups, with our staple chemicals and crude 
roots, barks and herbs supplied us with material with which to fill all 
prescriptions ? Do we not sometimes in a period of vexation sneer 
and snarl over these, useless to us, so-called elixirs of the present, 
and do we not get out of patience when physicians prescribe a 
preparation made by some particular person (nofe in our opinion a 
pharmacist) to the neglect of our own preparation that is in our 
opinion better ? Have not some of us tried to check the wheels of 



6o OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

progress, (in our opinion so-called progress,) and have we not 
occasionally limped to our dens with a crushed toe while the wheel 
rolled on ? Is it not true that many of us have fruitlessly opposed 
these innovations as they have swept over the country, and that we 
have viewed with detestation, (perhaps still do,) the great factories 
where men who perhaps never have pretended to be pharmacists make 
medicaments, and then under our very protests force us to use them ? 
Have we not sometimes become irritated at a gentlemanly solicitor 
whose every attempt to dispose of his wares demonstrated the fact 
that he was not in the least acquainted with the first principle of their 
production or their properties, and yet whose unpleasant duty it was 
to travel over the country to encourage us to use them instead of 
our own ?* 

Have we not more than once rebelled, and is it not usually to no 
purpose ? 

I am speaking now to a body of pharmacists who, as a rule, must 
perceive that these are facts. We stand together, and I, for one, 
realize that slowly but surely we will become antiquated if we refuse 
to move onward, and I know that we are moving onward, and that 
we struggle to prevent ourselves froiri being covered with incrustations 
and to avoid foscilization, we must take the pharmaceutical journals, 
not bne, but several. We must read and study them, and there is 
something to be learned in the advertising columns as well as the 
body of the journal. We must study indications and take advantage 
of each twist of the weather vane. The majority of us will be able 
to pass on with credit, we must do so if we keep in the path, but it 
will require an effort, while doubtless here and there an obstinate 
man will step aside and cling tenaciously to the olden time and serve 
the coming generation with an example of the pharmacist of other 
days. We must accept that our pills, ointments, plasters, chemicals, 
flavors, perhaps even some emulsions, syrups and tinctures will be 
made for us by men we call artisans. We must become artisans if we 



*More than once I have cautiously shown a solicitor the error of his belief or have endeavored to 
instruct him to his advantage. Sometimesithese interested gentlemen have gone with me to my 
laboratory and have been thankful for the attention. Traveling agents, as a rule, are gentlemen; 
they learn and teach, and help to move the world of commerce and of ideas. In turn I am often 
instructed by them. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 6 1 

compete, and we must, perhaps, adopt their methods or perish as 
progressive pharmacists. 

Our future field as pharmacists serms to be in mixing and supplying 
such substances as we can carry to advantage in our stores, unless the 
science broadens, or we step into specialty making ; and to oppose 
these innovations seems to be to slap at the hand of destiny that is 
writing on the wall so that "he who runs may read." To many these 
changes in our profession are unconscious and uncared for, but to 
many others they are painful, very. I am led to these remarks by 
the seemingly universal feeling among old pharmacists, that the 
profession is becoming demoralized. The change has not been abrupt, 
it is gradual; but as we make comparisons between intervals of time, 
it appears to have been made by jerks. In my opinion, we must be 
prepared to meet as great a revolution, (advancement or retrogression 
as you view it,) in the near future as in the past. 

I can see that we will continue to suffer, and those who rebel will 
do so at the expense of aching hearts. That our profession is not in 
a condition to rest on its oars, is evidenced by the attention physicians 
give to new ideas and new remedies ; by the facility with which the 
grocery or dry goods men adapt themselves to the absorption of 
sections of pharmacy or so-called pharmacy, (which lives nevertheless ;) 
by the obsolete remedies of the past, and those of the present that 
are nearly stagnant on our shelves ; by the synthetical chemicals, 
(patented, if you please,) that are displacing Nature's products and 
that take from us a demand for old-fashioned pharmaceutical 
manipulation. These and other causes lead me to believe that unless 
we move quickly we will fall behind, and that instead of kicking 
against the pricks, it behooves to be graceful and accept that the hand 
of destiny is writing. 

Finally, I will adJ that those who oppose this contmual change are, 
as a rule in my experience, the best of pharmacists ; educated, think- 
ing men, who have a foundation for their arguments, whom all should 
honor, and in no wise should their earnestness be questioned. Often 
(usually) these men begin the study with superior educations and 
maintain their position to the end and are aware of their advantages. 
I venture to say that in nearly every instance it will be found that 
these tenacious men are well informed, and that it is not because of 



62 



OHIO STATE PHABMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



ignorance or indolence that they refuse to gracefully accept present 
methods, but because of honor to themselves and respect for their 
profession. Some live in constant hope that the pendulum will swing 
back again; some may even think they observe indications of a change, 
but I will confess that it seems to me as though the past will not 
return in this generation. The methods and means by which medi- 
cines are made, sold, prescribed, advertised and dispensed appear to 
me to pass each year further from the accepted legitimate pharmacy 
of other days — and with irresistible motion. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 63 

PRESSED HERBS. 

BY JOSEPH FEIL, PH. G. 
Cleveland, O. * 



Query No. 5.-:- PF/ia/ t's the general quality of the Pressed Herbs of the 

market? 

Pressed herbs and parts of plants can be found in every drug store 
in this country, and while not having a great sale, yet the aggregate 
must count up to a very large number of pounds during the year. 
The pressers of these goods are energetic business men and have suc- 
ceeded in introducing their wares not only to the retail trade, but 
even many jobbers prefer to handle nearly all crude vegetable drugs 
in this form. 

The advantages of the pressed' goods are evident enough : the goods 
are clean, neatly put up, there is no loss in weight, usually packed 
when fresh, and when impressed with the name of a reliable house, 
can be depended on for at least a fair and usually an excellent 
article. The extent to which this branch of the drug business has 
grown can be inferred from the variety of drugs thus put up by the 
different firms, counting three lists I obtained the following totals, 
viz: 418, 397 and 276. 

While the kinds pressed are many, yet only about twenty have any 
extended sale. The following list of the very salable ones is com- 
piled from information obtained from the following firms, to whom I 
am also indebted for other valuable information contained in this 
paper, viz: Parke, Davis & Co.; Allaire, Woodward & Co.; B. O. & G. 
C. Wilson; Peek & Velsor; Cheney & Myrick; Walter Adams & Co. and 
Liebman & Butler. 

The order is in proportion to their sale. 

1. Boneset. 

2. Catnip. 

3. Hoarhound. 

4. Pennyroyal. 

5. Sage. 

6. Tansy. 

7. Pepperniint. 

8. Mullein. 

9. Thyme. 
10. Wormwood. 



II. 


Hops. 


12. 


Stramonium. 


13- 


Elder Flowers. 


14. 


Scullcap. 


15- 


Foxglove. 


16. 


Spearmint. 


17- 


Dandelion. 


18. 


Burdock. 


19. 


Golden Seal. 


20. 


Lobelia. 



64 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

All the firms report No. i to 7 inclusive as the best sellers, and one 
firm says : '* Canada uses especially large quantities of Mullein, Lobe- 
lia and Stramonium." 

It was impossible to examine packages of all these and of the dif- 
ferent pressers, hence whichever could be obtained from retail stores 
of Nos. I to 7 of different firm's packages were examined. 

The packages, as a rule, are very neatly put up and distinctly la- 
beled, and frequently synonyms, German and French names, medici- 
nal properties and doses were stated. 

The weight was full in all cases and in a few instances paraffine paper 
was placed around the herb inside the outer wrapper. 

The synonyms given were taken from the packages, and are given 
as a matter of curiosity. 

Abbreviations used: Wilson, B. O. & G. C. Wilson, Boston; P. 
D. & Co., Park, Davis & Co., Detroit; A. W. & Co., Allaire, Wood- 
ward & Co., Peoria, 111.; C. & M., Cheney & Myrick, Boston; L. & 
B., Liebman & Butler, New York; M. & N., Murray & Nickel, Chi- 
cago; Botanic Garden, (firm unknown.) 

BONESET. 

Synonyms: Thoroughwort, Ague Weed, Vegetable Antimony, 
Crosswort, Feverwort, Indian Sage, Sweating Plant, Thorpughstem, 
Thoroughwax, Tearel, Thorough Root. 

Wilson. — About i per cent, spider webs, etc., color bright green, 

odor good, leaves somewhat thinner than others. 

P. D. & Co. — 2 per cent foreign stems, straw, bits of bark, etc., 4 

per cent purplish leaves, color dark green, odor good. 

A. W. & Co. — I per cent, foreign stems and barks, 2 per cent, dis- 
colored leaves, colbr green but not bright, odor good. 

C. &. M. — 6 per cent, stems, bits of strings, etc., color bright-green, 

odor good. 
Few fruits were found in all the above. 

CATNIP. 

Synonyms: Catmint, Catwort, Bamfield, Catswort, Field Balm. 
Wilson. — Clean, bright-green, much fruit present, excellent. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 65 

P. D. & Co. — 3 per cent, medium sized stems, bits of dried leaves, 

etc, greenish-gray, flowers and some fruit present, 

odor strong. 
A. W. & Co. — 4 per cent, rather thick purplish stems, feathers, oats, 

etc., grayish-green, more fruit than flowers, odor 

strong. 
C. & M. — 2 per cent, rather thin green stems, color bright-green, 

fruits quite numerous, quality good. 
L. & B. — 3 per cent thin green stems, greenish with shade of gray, 

flowers and fruits abundant, quality good. 

HOARHOUND. 

Wilson. — I per cent, straw, etc., color good, mostly leaves, odor 

strong. 
P. D. & Co. — 5 per cent, coarse stems, i per cent, foreign matter, 

color slightly dark, leaves not very wooly. 
A. W. & Co. — I per cent foreign matter, color good, mostly leaves, 

not very wooly. 
C. & M.— 4 per cent, very coarse stems, i per cent, oats, etc., color 

very bright green, very wooly. 
L. & B. — ^i per cent, straw, etc., color, bright, very wooly, nearly all 

leaves, odor strong. 
M. & N. — 15 percent stems, color dull grayish-green, scarcely wooly, 
odor poor, quality very poor. 

PENNYROYAL. 

Synonyms : Squaw Mint, Stinking Balm, Thick Weed, Tick Weed. 
Wilson. — Clean, bright-green, nearly all leaves, odor strong. 

P. D. & Co. — Clean except j4 per cent pebbles, color green, nearly 

all leaves, odor strong. 

A. W. & Co. — 2 per cent dried leaves, earth, etc., 5 per cent thin 

stems, lightish-green, odor strong. 

C. & M. — 2 per cent stems, dried leaves, etc., 10 per cent thin 

stems, color green, odor strong. 

L. & B. — 5 per cent, barley, red earth, straw, etc., green, nearly all 

leaves, odor very strong. 



66 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 

SAGE. 

Wilson.— Greenish-gray, nearly all leaves, odor fair. 

P. D. & Co. — 2 per cent foreign stems, color grayish-green, nearly 

all leaves, odor good. 
L. & B. — Grayish green, nearly all leaves, odor very strong. 
No name. — Half very coarse stems, leaves coarse, odor weak, quality 

very poor. 

TANSY. 

Synonyms : Double Tansy, Hindheel. 
Wilson. — lo per cent, small green stems, color very bright-green, 

odor fair. 

P. D. & Co.— 4 per cent, coarse stems, wilted leaves, etc., color 

good, odor strong. 

A. W. & Co, — Many dried and discolored leaves, dark green, odor 

fair. 

C. & M. — 6 per cent, very coarse stems, bright-green, odor strong. 

L. & B. — 5 per cent coarse «tems, etc., dark green, odor fair. 

Botanic Garden. — 50 per cent very coarse purple stems, scarcely a 

trace of odor, quality very poor. 

PEPPERMINT. 

Wilson. — Clean, color dark-green, odor good. 

P. D. & Co.-^Clean, color green, odor strong. 

A. W. & Co. — 4 per cent purplish stems, dark green, odor good. 

C. & M. — 7 per cent bright purple stems, color very bright-green, 

odor fair. 

L. & B. — 2 per cent stems, green, odor good. 

From the descriptions it is hardly possible to tell fully just how 
much the herbs differed from each other, for there are many things 
tangible to the eyes and nose in this case, that are nearly impossible 
to describe, but taking an absolute grade as 100, the following table 
will give relative value of these goods. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 6'J 

Wilson, - - 98. 

p. D. & Co., - - 95. 

L. & B., - - 94. 

A. W. & Co., - - 90. 

C. & M., - - 88. 

M. & N., - - 50. 

Botanic Garden, - 25. 

No. Name, - - 20. 

Conclusions. — 

1. The pressed herbs of the market are true to name. 

2. The general quality is good, especially those sent out by relia- 
ble houses. 

3. It is possible to get almost ideal goods. 

4. Goods without the name of a known firm should be rejected. • 

5. When kept for sometime in stock they are better preserved 
than loose herbs. 

Mr. Rose water — Were these herbs just one lot from each hoiise, or 
were they gathered at various times ? That is, take for instance, 
Horehound— were they taken from different lots of the same firm's 
goods at different times of the year sent out, or were they simply 
accidentally taken at one time ? 

Mr. ' Feil — In reply, I will say it is various. I could not find, 
sometimes, dealers in the city who had more than one of each kind. 
But I tried to make examinations of different packages. These 
examinations were made within the first four months of this year, from 
January to May. I am led to believe that these houses get their 
stock in during the time the herbs are gathered fresh and pack them 
at that time. * However, that this would not affect the quality much 
would be gathered from a paper recently prepared by Mr. Todd* 
Mr. Todd, who is a large distiller of peppermint oil, thought he 
would test the herb after it had been gathered for some time. So 
he gathered some and divided it into two parts. One part he 
distilled immediately after he gathered it, and the other part he kep 
and dried for six months. He found the relative proportions of oil 
to be practically the same. The dried herb, however, yielded a 
slightly smaller proportion. On the other hand, he considered there 



68 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. - 

was more menthol in that, and on the whole his conclusion was that 
the oil distilled from the dried herb was better. Judging from the 
goods as an average, each house seems determined to put up a certain 
quality, and they put up just that quality. For instance, take 
Wilson's herbs. When I took them and put them all together I 
could see generally that their herbs were better in color than the 
others. It has been suggested that some of the firms could put some 
of the essential oil of the herb to it. I doubt it, but of course it 
could be done. And they have taken far more pains to take out the 
stems than the others. And so through the list; whereas, those 
without any name were very poor. It almost seemed as though they 
had purposely added stems to the herbs to increase the weight. So I 
judge that each firm has a standard which it pretty well adheres to. 
•This information, you will please take notice, is from my own 
examination. I have no knowledge from any of the houses. The 
only knowledge I have from the houses is in regard to those herbs 
which they sell. I supposed that very many of the herbs had a large 
sale for the reason that the houses quoted so many, but I found 
that very few had a large sale, and still fewer had an extensive sale. 

The President — We have representatives of a few of those houses 
present with us. We would like to hear remarks from some of these 
representatives. There is a member of our own Association here 
from whom we would be pleased to hear. 

Mr. Bellermann — Mr. President and gentlemen, I am very much 
pleased with this paper. In fact, I should commend it to other 
members of the Association, that when they are reading a paper com- 
paring goods on the market, it would be much better for each firm if 
they would make a statement as to what firm was being commented 
on. If anybody is doing good, it gives that man credit. I am 
pleased to hear that B. O. & G. C. Wilson have deserved their reputa- 
tion. I believe that they are generally acknowlndged to issue the 
finest herbs, and at the same time they ask the highest price. I do 
not think that Parke, Davis & Co. have endeavored to create the 
reputation that Messrs. Wilson have. They have endeavored to give 
you the drug just as the Pharmacopoeia, if it is official, indicates it 
should be. That is, if, in the case of boneset, for instance, the 
flowering tops are ordered, they give you the flowering tops. If in 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

gathering those tops there should be stems, of course they are included. 
As the gentleman reading the paper said, each house seems to make 
a special standard for itself, and speaking of Parke, Davis & Co., 
particularly, I think that is about the standard that they try to 
produce. In regard to keeping the drugs — the suggestion of Mr. 
Rosewater that they should have been examined in different seasons 
of the year — I do not think that that would have made any difference. 
I know, in our case, our endeavor is to obtain our supplies at the 
season of collection. With that object in view, we have recently 
established an agency under the superintendence of Prof. Hand, at 
Charlotte, N. C, for the purpose of collecting the crude material in 
that district at the proper season. We could not depend upon the 
wholesale drug market for our supplies ; it is entirely too uncertain. 
I should not be a bit surprised if other dealers do likewise. 



70 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



POWDERED OPIUM. 

BY JOHN J. BUEHLER, 
Cincinnati, O. 



Query No. 12. — Is Powdered Opium, sold in bulk, up to the Pharma- 

copceicU requirements ? 

Until about two years previous, all powdered opium supplied to the 
retail trade, was furnished by the wholesale dealers, in paper pack- 
ages mostly, or in bottles, which were simply labeled according to 
contents without reference to percentage strength in morphine. 

The last revision of the Pharmacopoeia requires that powdered 
opium shall contain not less than 12 per. cent, nor more than 16 per 
cent of morphine, when assayed by a process which it gives. 

About two years ago, the principal drug-millers, td furnish an article 
complying with the officinal requirements, began to supply this drug 
in sealed packages of one pound or less, the label bearing the per- 
centage value of the contents in morphine. 

The distribution of powdered opium in this manner has become 
almost universal, so that only a small part of the total is sold in bulk, 
that is, not under an assay label or one giving some indication of the 
strength of the sample, and this has come to be looked upon with sus- 
. picion. Hence the query, is powdered opium, sold in bulk, up to 
the Pharmacopoeial requirements ? 

Inquiry of the best wholesale druggists of this city revealed the fact 
that powdered opium, bought and sold by them in bulk, was obtained by 
them from the same drug-millers that supplied them with the article 
in original packages bearing an assay label. Powdered opium, **in 
bulk," as obtained through reliable dealers, should, therefore, be 
identical with that sold under an assay label, and assays of commer- 
cial specimens show this supposition to be, at least approximately, 
true. 

Eighteen samples of powdered opium, either prepared or sold by 
Powers & Weightman, McKesson & Robbins, Lehn & Fink, Dodge 
& Olcott, Wm. S. Merrell Chemical Co. and Lloyd Bros. , were assayed 
by the U. S. P. process, the results appearing in the following table, 
in which specimens not bearing an assay label, or other indication of 
morphine strength, are classed as **bulk." 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



71 



Number of 
Specimen. 



I... 
2... 

3 • 

4 .. 
5... 
6... 
7... 
8. . 



9. 
10. 
II, 



M ^ • • • • 



13 
14 

15 

16. 

17 
18 



Maker or 
Vender. 



A. 

B. 
Bv, 



B 

C 

c 



c. 
c. 



D 

D 

E...:.. 

12d ft • • * • 

F 

F 



F 
F 



Place where 
obtained. 



New York, 

New York 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Newport, Ky 

Newport, Ky 

Cincinnati . . 



Cincinnati 



Brookville, Ind. 
Brookville, Ind. 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 



Cincinnati 
Cincinnati 



MORPHINB PbR CbNT. 



U. S. P. Process. 



Indicated. 



Bulk. 
Bulk. 
13.0 

U. S. P. 
U. S. P. 

13-0 

13-0 

130 
U. S. P. 

U. S. P. 

Bulk. 

Bulk. 

U. S. P. 

U. S. P. 

Bulk. 

Bulk. 

Bulk. 

Bulk. 



Found. 



140 
13.6 

130 

130 

130 
II. O 

II.O 

II. O 

12.0 

II. 6 

II.O 
II.O 

13-0 

134 

lO.O 

10. o 
10.0 

II.O 



Squibb's Pro- 
cess. 

(Calculated.) 



15-61 
15.16 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
12.26 
12.26 
12.26 
13.38 

12.93 
12.26 

12.26 

14.50 

14.95 
II. 15 
II. 15 

II. 15 

12.26 



Inspection of the table will show that a part of those classed as 
bulk are much below the lowest limit of officinal strenfi;th. As these 
are very uniform in percentage of morphine, (10 per cent.,) they were 
probably sent out by one drug-miller, but neither the maker nor the 
seller could be identified. The remainder equal in strength the 
samples sold under an assay label. 

According to the law regulating the importation of opium, no opium 
can be admitted into this country that contains less than 9 per cent. 



72 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

of morphine. As opium nearly always contains very near 20 per cent, of 
water, the powdered drug must contain not less than 11.25 P^r cent, 
morphine. 

Of the commercial powders assayed for this paper, one-half con- 
tained less than 11.25 PC'' cent, morphine — six, ii.o per cent., and 
three, lo.o per cent. 

Were these samples reduced or adulterated by addition of other 
material ? 

As the proportion of water-soluble matter was not estimated, or 
other tests of purity made, the only reliance, in answering this ques- 
tion, is the percentage of morphine. 

The U. S. P. process of estimating morphine in opium, gives results 
which, while very constant, are at the same time much below the 
truth. Other methods yield products of equal purity and in much 
greater quantity, the results being equally constant. And the best of 
these, in the experience of the operator, is that of Dr. Squibb. That 
used by the Government examiners differs from this chiefly in the use 
of hot water in extracting the drug. Hence, we may safely compare 
the U. S. P. process with that of Dr. Squibb for the purpose of deter- 
mining the actual morphine strength of these samples and, therefore, 
their probable purity. 

A sample of pure powdered opium gave, in a number of assays by 
the U. S. P. process, for the highest result, 13.02 per cent, morphine, 
and for the lowest, 12.99 per cent., thus containing just 13.00 per 
cent, morphine. It was then assayed by Dr. Squibb's method. In 
the first assay, the time of precipitation was extended to 15 hours, 
when the crystals were collected, washed and dried. The weight in- 
dicated 14.65 per cent, morphine, but the product was not entirely 
soluble in lime-water. A second assay, stopped at 12 hours precipita- 
tion, gave 14.57 per cent., the matter insoluble in lime-water amount- 
ing to about one-half that of product of first assay. A third assay 
made under the same conditions, gave 14.58 per cent. In the fourth, 
the time of precipitation was extended to 36 hours. The result 
showed much over 15 per cent., but a very large part of the precipi- 
tate was insoluble in lime-water. These results showing that in all 
cases the time of precipitation was too long, by which other substan- 
ces than morphine were thrown out of solution, a fifth assay was 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 73 

made. The mixture was frequently shaken during the first hour of 
precipitation, and the crystals collected at the end of 9 hours. The 
product equalled 14.4 per cent, and was completely soluble in 
lime-water. The result is, doubtless, too low. This powdered opium, 
therefore, contained about 14.50 per cent, morphine, or 11.5 per 
cent, more than was shown by the U. S. P. process. 

If this addition be made to the ii.o per cent, samples, they will 
show 12.26 per cent, and will be within the officinal requirements, 
though not in all cases up to the percentage claimed. The lo.o per 
cent, samples will show 11. 15 per cent. This figure is so near 
11.25 per cent, that the difference may be due to error of experiment, 
and the samples really be up to legal but not to officinal requirements. 
It thus appears that all these samples may be pure, although their 
purity is not fully made certain. 

From these data we conclude that commercial powdered opium sold 
in "bulk," as obtained through good dealers, is up to Pharmacopoeial 
requirements and is identical with that sold in orie;inal packages or 
under an assay label. 

There is also offered for sale a powdered opium, which, if pure, is 
produced from opium of the lowest grade, barely meets legal require- 
ments and is much below the limit of officinal strength. 

With this exception, all powdered opium sold in bulk is fully up to 
the officinal requirements, and its quality is assured if it is obtained 
through responsible dealers. 



74 OHIO STATE PHABMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



COMPARATIVE SOLUBILITY OF BRANDS OF 

EXTRACT OF LICORICE. 

BY E. GOODMAN, 
Cincinnati, O. 



Query No. 14. — What is the Comparative Solubility of the different 

Brands of Extract of Licorice ? 

This is rather a personal question, but I do not intend to make it 
such* To begin, would like to make a few preliminary remarks as to 
the conditions under which the examinations were made. I neither 
favored nor was prejudiced toward any particular brand or brands ; 
the examinations were made impartially and as accurately as it was 
possible for me to do. I adopted three different methods. I could 
not give my undivided time to this, but the work upon it had to be 
sandwiched in between the routine work of the store. 

I tested all the various brands I could obtain, viz. : 

P. S. Corigliano, Solazzi, Y. & S. Scudder, M. & R., L. & F., 
Powdered Licorice and Licorice Lozenges. 

With the object in view of obtaining * 'Purified Extract of Licorice," 
I exhausted i lb. (Av.) each of the first six named brands of Licorice. 
I started all six at the same, in the room and in the same sized 
percolators, so as to make all the conditions alike in each. Having 
broken the Licorice into pieces about i or i ^ inches long, and split 
each piece lengthwise, I packed each brand in a quart percolator, the 
neck of which was fitted with a plug of absorbent cotton. For each 
pound of Licorice I used i oz. of clean. Excelsior packing, putting 
in alternate layers of Excelsior and Licorice and a layer of Excelsior 
on top ; then stopped the orifices of the percolators with corks and 
filled each with water. Drew off the solution after 15 hours, for the 
first three days, then every 30 hours for the rest of the week. The 
second week, I drew the liquor off every 48 hours ; after that every 
third day for four weeks longer. Reserved the first two gallons of 
concentrated solution and evaporated the rest on a water bath, as fast 
as it was drawn off. After six weeks most of the brands were almost 
entirely exhausted and the others nearly so ; could not continue the 



OmO STATE PHABMACEXmCAL ASSOCIATION. 75 

percolation any longer on account of the fermentation which began 
to set in. After allowing the masses to drain in the percolators, 
dumped each out upon a separate piece of paper and covered them 
with the same ; placed 3 at a time upon a large board, alongside of 
the stove to dry. After 4 or 5 days, when the mass was so dry as to 
break readily between the fingers, I weighed each separately, allowing 
I oz for the Excelsior, with the following results : P. S., 25.1 per cent, 
28.7, 29.8, 27.8, 29.26, 30.8 percent, the first three being foreign 
brands, the latter three, domestic. Being a little dubious about the 
results, fearing that some of the finer particles might have passed 
through the cotton, I determined upon a verification process, by 
macerating one Troy oz. each of the above brands, as well as one 
Troy oz. of Powdered Extract of Licorice and Licorice Lozenges, and 
then filtering through paper. The remaining brand, whose precipitate 
was exactly similar in appearance and weight to the<me^ which character- 
ized itself from all the others, by producing a nearly white, very fine 
precipitate, while the other precipitates had a sandy or muddy 
appearance, is undoubtedly the same Licorice, but branded with the 
name of the firm for whom it was made. I macerated the Licorice 
reduced to fine particles, for 10 days in quart packers, filled with 
water, shaking occasionally ; then filtered through weighed filters and 
dried the same upon a water bath until they ceased to loose weight. 
The filtrate I treated with Sulphuric Acid to precipitate the 
Glycyrrhizin, and the results being only relatively required, it was 
not necessary to purify the Glycyrrhizin, as the relation would still 
remain, but would only reduce the quantity, which was already small. 
The results in the foreign brands differed but slightly from the original 
method on 14^ times the quantity, but in the domestic brands there 
was quite a difference, with the exception of one brand, the Y. & S. 
The reason for this is seen in the process of maceration, the residues 
of the imported Licorices being in flat scales, while that of the 
domestic are very fine, heavy, pulverurent and will therefore readily 
pass through the septa. Let us first tabulate results and then draw 
conclusions : 



76 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



Insoluble residue from xlb 

(Av.) (licorice by 

percent. 



Insoluble residue from 

5 (Troy) same Lioorioe by 
maceration. 




GlycjmrhixiB fiom Corre- 
sponding Licorice. 



P. S. 5 percenL 

4.93 

6.5 

9.3 

9.5 
Y. S. 10.0 

9.3 



Average: tare on filter 
was destroyed by add; 
only a trace. 




From these results one would naturally conclude that the foreigners 
exhaust their Glycyrrhiza without the addition of an Alkali, while the 
Americans add an Alkali to their menstruum. The reasons are 
twofold : 

I St. The domestic brands contain nearly double the amount of 
Glyc)rrrhizin of the foreign brands. 

2d. The imported Licorice, not being treated by an Alkali, the men- 
struum does not so completely dissolve out the gluten, thereby retaining 
the starchy matter in an agglutinative state, in which condition it does 
not so readily pass through the septum, as shown in the scaly, 
tenacious residue of the foreign, contra the pulverulent residue of 
domestic brands. 

3d. From what little experience I have had in making Extractum 
Glycyrrhizae Purum, U. S. P.,. I find that considerable extraneous 
matter comes from the cortical layer of Glycyrrhiza. 

If these conclusions of mine prove correct, then Ammonia, while 
it facilitates the solution of Glycyrrhizin, also facilitates the intro- 
duction of starchy or insoluble matter. 

The foreign brands are the best from a commercial standpoint, while 
the domestic excel them as pharmaceutical products. The former, 



OHIO STATE PHARUACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, J 7 

besides being more soluble, also have a richer flavor, whether natural 
or artificial, I am not prepared to say; they also give dark brown 
transparent solutions, while the solutions of the domestic brands are 
lighter and opalescent, which may be another sign of the presence of 
gluten. From the foregoing it will be seen that the relative solubility 
and value narrows down between foreign and domestic brands^ those 
from the same continent being about of equal value. 

Time required — from first week in February to first week in June. 



73 



OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



BYS. W, MCK^OWN, 
Youngstown, O. 



Query No. 14.— JVha/ is the Comparatvve SolubtHiy of the different 

Brands of Extract of Licorice ? 
' Five specimens were taken for examination. One-half gram of each 
brand was weighed for the purpose of determining the soluble and 
insoluble matter. After digesting in pure distilled water for 24 hours 
at a temperature between 60® and 70® Fah., and with occasional 
stirring, the solution was filtered through No. i Swedish filter paper, 
the insoluble washed with water and thrown upon the filter and all 
washed until the washings came through the filter colorless. The 
msoluble portion, together with the counterbalanced filters, through 
which it was filtered was then dried in a hot water oven until weight 
was constant. The aqueous solution was evaporated to complete 
dryness in a tarred platinum dish and weighed. The loss was 
assumed to be water. The results were as follows : 





Imsolublk. 


Puss Extract. 


Watbr. 


CorigliaD J 

Scadder 

Y.&S 

Leho&Fink 

Mellor & Rittenhouae 


25.20 

34.77 
24.65 

31.08 
31.03 


60.30 
56.36 
58.46 
54.60 
60.15 


14.50 

8.87 

16.89 

14.32 
882 







In the Mellor & Rittenhouse, Lehn & Fink and Scudder bran'ds, the 
insoluble was found by means of the microscope to be largely 
composed of Corn Starch, while Wheat Flour was recognized in the 
Y. & S. No Starch grains could be detected in the Corigliano. 

In order to estimate the Glycyrrhiziny 2 grams of each specimen 
were treated as before described, with pure distilled water, filtered, 
and the Glycyrrhizin precipitated with Sulphuric Acid. The precipi- 
tate was filtered and washed slightly, redissolved in dilute Ammonia, 



OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



79 



and again precipitated with Sulphuric Acid filtered through counter- 
balanced filters, washed with dilute Acetic Acid, dried in a hot water 
oven until weight was' constant. • The process was repeated on 
another set of samples, using a lo per cent, solution of Ammonia to 
exhaust the drug. The following results were obtained : 



Corigliano 

Scudder....^ 

Y.&S 

Lehn& Fink 

Mellor & Rittenhouse 



Glycjrrrhizin 
with pure wstar> 


GIyc]rrrhuin 
with NH 4. 


2.90 per cent 


4.42 per cent. 


2.75 " 


6.15 «' 


2.95 " 


7.63 " 


8.40 •• 


9.07 " 


8.37 •• 


8.92 •' 



It is not claimed that the Glycyrrhizin obtained by the above treat- 
ment was strictly pure, but it was thought that any attempt to further 
purify it would be attended with a loss greater than the impurity 
would amount to. Comparative results were all that was aimed at, 
and working unpon the same sample, they were found to be quite 
uniform. 

A specimen, of select Licorice Root was treated according to the 
process given in the U. S. Pharmacopoeia for Extractum Glycyrrhizae 
Purum, and the Glycyrrhizin determined by the Sulphuric Acid 
method. Results, as follows : 

Pure Extract 35-69 per cent. 

Glycyrrhizin 5.31 " " 

The percentage of Glycyrrhizin to the pure extract is 14.86 per 
cent., equivalent to 8.85 per cent, of a commercial extract similar in 
composition and moisture to the Mellor & Rittenhouse. 

It will be observed that in two of the brands of Extract of 
Licorice, from 56 to 62 per cent, of the Glycyrrhizin is insoluble in 
pure water ; while in two other brands all but 6 to 8 per cent is 
soluble without the addition of Ammonia. 

It is a noticeable and curious fact that the highest priced brand of 
Licorice in the market contains the smallest percentage of Glycyrrhizin. 



8o OHIO STATE PHABMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



OLEUM MENTHA PIPERITiE. 

AZOR THURSTON, 
Grand Rapids, Ohio. 



Query No. 15. — Test the OU of Peppetmint; is the Demeniholized Oil 

sold as Pure Oil of Peppermint? 

To answer the above query one would naturally look to the standard 
of authority, the U. S. P., for tests as to purity, etc. In doing so we 
find the following : 

"A volatile oil distilled from Peppermint. A colorless, or yellowish 
or greenish yellow liquid, becoming darker and thicker by age and 
exposure to air, having the characteristic, strong odor of Peppermint, 
a strongly aromatic taste, followed by the sensation of cold when air 
is drawn into the mouth, and a neutral reaction, sp. gr. about 0.900. 
It is soluble in equal weight of Alcohol" 

The above pharmacopoeial description of Oil of Peppermint is 
sinkilar to that given by a number of other volatile oils. The sp. gr. 
0.900 is Ae same as given for oils of eucalyptus, spearmint apd 
rosemaiy. ''A colorless, or yellowish, or greenish-yellow liquid with 
a neutral reaction " could be applied to nearly all of the volatile oils. 

Nine samples of oil of peppermii^t were examined, as follows : 






OMIO STATX PMASMACaUWCAL AaaOOIATION. 



8i 



i 



■ g 



bo 

III 



53 



Si 



l4 

i3 



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9^ 

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u 






w 
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ja- 

I 



9 

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a 



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i 



1^ 
2! 



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1+-^ 

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K<5 



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c 



I 

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n 












6 



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a- 



t 



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.ill 

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ei > 



1 






it 






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^ 



i' 



^ 






li 



:!• 



il 



:?• 



•9 » 

5" 



1'^ 






!>' 



r2E 



11 



2>' 



53 



II 



3S 



CO 



1^ 



•Six 







CO 






« 13 tf 



.Si 

3 • 

50 





i 



i 






& 



a 



a 



a 

s 






a 



as 



ill 



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*a ** »» 



a M 



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a 



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i a g 






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82 OmO STATE PHABMACEUnOAL ASSOCIATION 

Nitric Acid test gives the best results by adding one drop of the 
acid to 40 or 50 of the oil. At first the color is brown, but turns 
blue or blue violet within one or two hours. The same color 
reaction is given with Nitric Acid and Alcohol. One drop 
of Nitric Acid to 20 or 30 drops Alcohol and one drop of the oil. 
Oil of Pennyroyal does not give color test with the above test. 

Concentrated Sulphuric Acid (2 or 3 drops to i of oil) gives a 
brown color, with oil of Peppermint, turning to a fine red after some 
time. Con. H, SO4, produces same color with oil of caraway, mentha 
crispa, sweet marjoram, star-anise, mace, dill, juniper, cubebs, copaiba, 
sage, wintergreen, lavender, cascarilla, nutmeg, th3rme, sandalwood, 
myrrh and parsley (Dragendorff,) Dilute Alcoholic Hydrochloric Acid, 
add rs to 20 drops to i of oil in a test tube. Gives a red color, 
turning blue after a few minutes. Care should be taken to use dilute 
alcoholic HCU as the concentrated will give very different results with 
different oils; for instance, with oil of turpentine, the concentrated 
alcoholic HCl ^ould {produce a cheny red color, while tiiie dilate does 
hot give a color test with oil of turpebtimu ' 

The dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid prodmces a roie to a deep 
red or reddish violet with oils of cubdbs, pepper, copaiba,, cedarwood, 

cinnamon, nutmeg, thyme, laurel, sweet-flag and myrrit, (Diagen* 
dorff.) 

Picric Acrid ^ives a deep grass green with oil of peppermint. 

Solution of Bromine in Chloroform (i — 20) gives rose, red or 
reddish violet with oil of peppermint. Same color re-action with 
oils of rosemary, fennel, jinis^, star-anise, cinnamon, nutmeg, thyme, 
parsley and myrrh, (Dragendorff.) 

Iodine — Add 2 or 3 drops of oil to a few grains of re-sublimed 
iodine, very slight re-action with pure oil of peppermint, yapor almost 
invisible. This test is the one used to show the absence of oil of 
fireweed, oil turpentine, oil camphor and other terebinthinate oils, as 
they give brisk re-action with iodine. . ; , 

Chloral Hydrate and Sulphuric Acid and! Alcohol — ^Take i part H, 
SO4 to 2 parts C, HClj O.H, O, mix in a mortar; then add a few drops 
of Alcohol, stir until the mixture is clear. Use this mixture with 
equal amount ot oil, the result is a fine cherry color with pure oil of 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 83 

peppermint If the oil is mixed with pennyroyal, the mixture turns 
to an olive green color. 

Alcohol. — Oil of peppermint soluble in all portions in Alcohol, oil 
of erigerion, turpentine and eucalyptus gives a milkly color. Old 
oxidized oil of peppermint does not dissolve in all proportions in 
Alcohol, but gives a milky color. 

Castor and other fixed oils leave a greasy stain when i or 2 drops 
are evaporated off from paper. 

The samples examined were all of good quality, although they did 
not all give a clear solution with Alcohol. I think it was due more 
to age than to impurities. When heated on paper, five of the samples 
left a slight stain. 

"Is the Dementholized Oil sold as pure oil of Peppermint?" This 
part of the question I have npt had time and opportunity to answer 
l)y experimiental work, but there is no doubt dementholized oil has 
been sold as pure oil in some sections of the country. 

The following appeared in the Toledo Blade, January, 1887 : 

'^'MORS RASCALITY IN MICHIGAN. 

" Detroit, Jan. 29, — A warrant is out for the arrest of Daniel B. 
Newkirk for fraudulent dealings in peppermint oil. Newkirk is a 
resident of Wayne, this county, and has been purchasing oil from 
farmers and selling it in this city to candy-makers; and others having 
use for it. Among his customers was a firm who used the oil for 
manufacturing menthpl. It appears that for nearly three years New- 
kirk . has bought back from this firm worthless dementholized oil, 
which was then sold to others in the city. The amount of fraud is 
not known, but it is believed to be about $20,000." 

Fritsclie's freezing test is the one generally applied to detect 
dementholized oil. 

Many papers, .qf late, haye been pul?lished in reference to oil of 
peppermint and its adulterations. Among the latest are those of Dr. 
S. P. Duffield and A. M.Todd, in reference to the use of the 
polariscope in detecting adulterated oils. 

For those that may wish to investigate the subject of oil of pepper- 
mint, I append a ii^t of rd^rences : A Test for Oil of Peppermint, by 
E. C. Federer, Ph.C, " Pharmaceutical Era," Vol I, p. 36; .Oil of 



S4 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Peppermint, S. P. Duffield, Ph.D., same, Vol. I, p. 67; Fraudulent 
Oil Peppermint, same, p. 95; Dementholized Oil of Peppermint, 
same. Vol. I, p. 135; Experiments with Oil Peppermint, by E. C. 
Federer, same, Vol. I, p. 137; Test for Oil of Peppermint, ''Western 
Druggist," Vol. 8, 1886, p. 306; Oil of Peppermint, by Albert M. 
Todd, same, p. 366. This article may also be found in the "Proceed- 
ings Am. Pharm. Association, 1886, Vol. 34, p. 121, and "Pharma- 
ceutical Record," Vol. 6, 1886, p. 363. A Strange Forgery on 
Michigan Peppermint, by Albert M. Todd, "Pharmaceutical Record," 
Vol. 6, 1886, p. 204. Essential Oil Papers: The Polariscope as a 
Revealer of Adulterations, "American Journal of Pharmacy," Vol. 
59, 1887, p. 161. Dragendorff Plant Analysis — Action of Iodine on 
Oil of Peppermint, " Weekly Drug News," VoL I^, p. 447; Oil of 
Peppermint — Resinification and Test for Removal of Pipmenthol, 
"Proceedings American Pharm. Association," 1886, Vol. 34, p. 541. 
Dr. Lyons — Mr^ President, we in Wayne county, Michigan, are 
particularly interested in Oil of Peppermint. It has been the practice 
of some manufacturers of Menthol, perhaps, (we won't say who ; we 
don't know who,) to get rid of thrir refuse material, dementholized 
oil, to the farmers of Wayne county, and let it come back through 
the ordinary channels of trade as pure peppermint oil, which is liable 
to be a little weedy — that is, to contain a lot of fire weed. The 
fraud has been carried on certainly, on a large scale, and I am very 
much interested, in common with others in our neighborhood, in 
getting at any new methods of determining whether oil of peppermint 
has been dementholized or not. This paper appears not to have 
given us anything new. I hope that any members of this Association 
or any others who want to investigate any particular subject will give 
us information on that problem. Of course, in making tests, the 
polariscope is very useful ; but very few possess that instrument. It 
is very easy to., make a test with the polariscope, of GMirse.. The 
trecbometer is a new instrument which Dr. Duffield has been using, 
and with very good results, in determining the purity of oil of 
peppermint; but of course that has the same objections that the 
polariscope has. What we want is a practical test. The freezing 
test is one of the very best, but it is open to some objections. I 
hope that some member of this Association will do work on that 
subject in the coming year. 



OHIO STATE PHABMACEUnCAL ASSOCIATION. 85 



MORPHINE SULPHAS. 

J. GEO. SPENZER, 
Cleveland, O. 



JVofes on a Specimen, 

For a year or more price lists have quoted a foreign manufacture of 
Sulphate of Morphine, at from 20 to 40 cts. discount on the price of 
other foreign and domestic makes. Jobbers, who were inquired of 
as to the cause of this, replied that the reasons were : 

t. An effort to obtain patronage. 

2. That it was heavy and in flakes and did not present that lights 
feathery form so much desired ; but, that for all purposes of dispensing, 
it was exactly as good as the higher priced article. On these condi- 
tions, and following the example of many others, an ounce bottle was 
purchased for trial; it being for a time, almost exclusively used. 
After having used it for a period, and when making concentrated 
solutions as Magendies' hypodermic solution, it was noticed that a 
precipitate formed at once, or upon standing. This precipitate, which 
subsequently proved to be Calcium Sulphate, was filtered off and the 
clear liquid dispensed for hypodermic medication. Complaints, how- 
ever, were soon lodged against it on the ground that when so used it 
quite often produced either a troublesome abscess, or a painful and 
indolent sore. 

To ascertain whether it was the patient's peculiar condition, or the 
Morphine Solution which produced this effect, it was replaced by 
another make of Morphine, but no ill effects were noticeable ; whilst 
in one case (Lumbago,) two abscesses were produced by separate 
injections of the first Morphine. Those who had used it think that 
after the calcium sulphate had been removed by filtration, the solution 
did not produce such bad results as when allowed to remain ; as 
would be the case when it was made extemporaneously. 

It was now in turn to determine the fault of the morphine, and to 
this end two other makes of sulphate of morphine were obtained for 
comparison. They will be called i, 2 and 3. No. i being the 
morphine which caused the trouble, while Nos. 2 and 3 are the samples 
for comparison. The tests applied were — 



86 OHIO at ATE PHABMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 

1. Ignition. — Morphine should volatilize entirely, (a residue may 

indicate calcium, magnesium or sodium sulphates. 

2. Caustic Potash (a). — Morphine covered with a solution of 

caustic potash should give a clear solution, (absence of nar- 
cotine and codeine, etc.) (d) The solution should be colorless 
or of a faint yellow color, (absence of foreign alkaloids, 
sugars, etc.) (c) When heated it should remain odorless, 
(absence of ammonium salts.) 

3. Concentrated Sulphuric Acid. — If morphine be covered with 

concentrated sulphuric acid and gently agitated, a colorless or 
faint pink-tinted solution alone should result, (absence of 
foreign alkaloids and cane sugar.) 

4. Reaction. — If a crystal of morphine be placed upon a moist 

piece of red or blue litmus paper, no change in color should 
be produced, (absence of acids or bases.) 

5. Ammonium Oxalate. — An aqueous solution of morphine should 

remain unaltered by ammonium oxalate, (absence of lime.) 

6. Ammonium Phosphate. — An aqueous solution of morphine 

should not be effected by ammonium phosphate, ^absence of 
magnesia.) 

7. Alcohol. — Should give a perfect and clear solution. 

8. Water. — Should give a clear solution. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

« 



87 



SCHEDULE. 



Reagent. 



Ignition 



Caustic 

Potash . . 



Salpburic 
Acid .... 

Reaction .... 
Ammonium 

Oxalate.. 
Ammonium 
Phosphate. 



Substance Sought For. 



Alcohol 



Water 



Calcium and Magnesium Sulphates . . 

Sodium Sulphate 

( Narcotine and Codeine 

Foreign alkaloids and sugars 

w Ammonium Salts 

I Foreign alkaloids 

Acids or bases 

Lime 

Magnesia 

Insoluble substances 



Insoluble substances. 



.207. 

None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 

None. 

Distinctly 
Acid. 

Some. 
Some. 

Yes. 

Yes. 



None. 

None. 

None. 

None. 

None. 

Neutral. 

Some. 

Some. 

Yes. 

Yes. 



.io7o 

None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 

Neutral. 

Faint ^ 
trace. 
Faint 
trace. 

None. 
None. 



The results of the examination and the effects which the morphine 
produced, were communicated to the jobber from whom it was 
obtained. In reply inej, he said they had had complaints from nearly 
every customer to whom it had been sold; some stating that in sub- 
cutaneous injection alone had it been found faulty ; and in conclusion 
he said they would no longer keep it in stock. From the schedule 
it will be seen that the morphine No. i had an acid reaction and 
contained calcium and magnesium sulphates. This alone might be 
explanation enough for the trouble produced, as it is a well-known 
fact that acid and concentrated injections will produce abscess; but 
perfectly neutral, weak and harmless hypodermics, in certain impov- 
erished conditions of the blood, as rheumatism and gout, may do 
likewise* 



$g OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



ETHYL NITRITE. 

J. GEO. SPENZER, 
Cleveland, O. 



Some Experiments on the Color ^ Boiling Point and Specific Gravity, 
Last wintCT, while engaged in the preparation of Ethyl Nitrite in 
somewhat large quantities, the conflict of authorities and text books 
upon the boiling point, color, and specific gravity, which I had 
observed several years ago, while preparing some experimentally, 
occurred to me, and I decided to follow a line of experiments, 
which, although not expecting to alter the dispute one way or another, 
I hoped would give a happy medium of results upon these points. 
How well I have succeeded, I leave to your kind consideration. 

A short description of the methods used, and a few criticisms on 
the processes, may be of interest. The methods employed were — 

1. Liebig. — Liebig's Anualen, Vol. 30, page 140. 

2. Emil Kppp. — Review Scientific, Vol. 27, page 273. 

3. Process of United States Pharmacopoeia, 1880. 

4. Carey Lea. — American Journal Science, 2 ser. Vol. 32, page 95. 

5. Grosourdy. — Journal Chemic Medicale, or, Muspratt's Chem., 

Vol. I, page 834. 

6. Feldhaus. — Liebig's Anualen, Vol. 126, page 71. 

1. Liebig's method is the one given in many of the standard text 
and reference books, etc., and as far as I can discern, yields a product 
much above any of the others in purity. It is prepared by passing 
nitrogen trioxide, (formed by heating starch and nitric acid in a 
capacious retort,) into a WoulfTe bottle containing a cold mixture of 
I part of 85 per cent, alcohol and 2 parts of water, the nitrogen 
trioxide passing through the alcohol, forms ethyl nitrite, which imme- 
diately distills off and is condensed by means of a Liebig's condenser 
or a Mohr's worm surrounded with a freezing mixture, it is then 
washed with water to remove alcohol, and dried over calcium chloride. 

2. Kopp's method. This is recommended by Beilstein, (Beilstein 
or Gainschen Chemic, Vol. I.) as forming a product which is but 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION^. 89 

seldom equaled. It is also the method used by Strecker in his 
researches on the action of caustic potash on Ethyl Nitrite, (Liebig's 
Anualen, Vol. 77, page 331.) It is prepared by adding copper turn- 
ings to a mixture of equal parts of nitric acid and alcohol, contained 
in a retort connected to a cooling apparaitus ; the action which starts 
up is sufficient to cause the ether to pass over without the application 
of external heat. It may now be either washed and dried, or proceed 
as Kopp directs, viz.: pass the ether in the state of vapor through a 
wash bottle containing water, which in turn is connected to a calcium 
chloride dr3ring tube, and this latter to a cooling apparatus and the 
pure ether collected. 

3. United States Pharmacopoeia Process : A mixture of alcohol, 
sulphuric acid and nitric acid, are distilled and the distillate washed 
with water. 

4. Method of M. Carey Lea is similar to the preceding one, with 
the exception that ferrous sulphate is employed in place of the 
sulphuric acid. 

5. Grosourdy: Use a mixture of either nitrite or nitrate of 
potassium, alcohol and sulphuric acid ; this he heats gently for 48 to 
72 hours, when the ether distills over. 

6. Feldhaus claims the following method to be the best, after 
having tried others: A mixture of potassium nitrite, water and 
alcohol, are poured gradually into a cold mixture of alcohol, water 
and sulphuric acid contained in a distillatory apparatus ; heat enough 
is produced in the reaction to carry it through and the ether distills 
off. In methods 3 and 4, some ordinary ether is produced. In 5 a 
large amount of aldehyde is formed. In all the processes undecom- 
posed alcohol passes over ; this is particularly so in 5 and 3. 

In I and 2, as Watts (Gmelin's Handbook) suspected, and as Smith 
und Duflos have proved, a small amougt of Ethyl Chloride is produced 
when cakium chloride is used as a drying agent. The following 
general method was used in purifying the products of the several 
methods, viz.: 

The distillate was shaken with one-third its volume of ice water, 
vigorously, three successive times. After the third washing, the ether 
was separated as much as possible by means of a separatory funnel, 
and the washed ether shaken occasionally in one-half hour with pure 



9© OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 

% 

recently ignited potassium carbonate, allowed to settle, decanted into 
a dry flask and distilled. During this treatment, No. 5 alone browned 
the potassium carbonate used. The weight of authority, and all the 
standard chemical works, give the color as a light yellow. 

Grosourdy and Courbe, however, contradict this. Grosourdy,. 
(Journal Chemic Medicale, or, Muspratt's Chem., Vol. I, page 855,) 
refers the color to a hydrocarbon, and says it may be removed 
by repeated distillation from potassium carbonate. Some Ethyl 
Nitrite was prepared according to Grosourdy's method, following the 
process out in every detail. A faintly yellow straw-colored liquid was 
collected in the receiver; when this was shaken with ice water, how- 
ever, it at once dimished in volume and formed two layers, an upper 
layer of a bright yellow color the exact counterpart of Ethyl Nitrite, 
and a lower colorless layer, a mixture of alcohol and water. This 
upper layer was now subjected to six distillations with potassium 
carbonate ; the distillates kept growing lighter and lighter until the 
last ones were almost colorless. The boiling point, however, had 
rapidly risen from 60° to 78*^ C. It burned, and otherwise denoted 
its alcoholic nature. If the almost colorless liquid be shaken with 
ice water, or, if before each redistillation, the distillates be washed 
with water, a yellowish liquid will always separate out. The decom- 
position of the ether by distillation with potassium carbonate, is well- 
known, and was proven on the ether of all the processes. 

Courbe said the color was due to an oil which could De removed 
by successive distillations from sugar. 

For the purpose, white rock candy was powdered and boiled with 
some Ethyl Nitrite made after Liebig's method, in a flask connected 
with a reverse condenser, for two hours, when it was distilled off and 
the process continued with a fresh portion of sugar, and again dis- 
tilled off. This was kept up for a day, distilling 4 times, but no signs 
of a fading of color presented themselves. 

BOILING POINT. 

Liebig made the boiling point 16. 4° C. 
Mohr '* *' " *' 17.5°— i8°C. 
Brown " ** *' *' 16.6^— i7.8°C. 
Thenard *' ** *' '* 2i°C. at 7.30. 



OHIO STATE PHABMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 9I 

Mm. brometric pressure. Strecker (Kurtzes organischen Chem. 
2 te auf.,) gives it at i6°C. 

The following method was used in determining the boiling point : 

The ether decanted from the carbonate of potassium was poured 
into a small Wurtz fractional distillation flask, with a plain neck, 
around which was wrapped several thicknesses of paper; the flask 
was now connected to a condenser and fitted with a caoutchouc stop- 
per, through which a thermometer passed into the liquid. In the 
final determinations, which represent some 50 or more, a Geissler 
standard thermometer was used. 

The heat applied was very gentle, using the paJm of the hand, 
while the temperature of the room in no case was above + 12® C. and 
in the greater number of determinations was from + 3° to + 4^ C. 
At first, the boiling point was secured by allowing the liquid to boil 
thoroughly, then allowing it to cool, and again boiling, during which 
the bulb of thermometer was alternately raised to j4 inch below the 
orifice of th6 exit tube, and again lowered into the liquid ; this was 
to see whether the boiling liquid and its vapor were of the same tem. 
perature; in the majority of instances they were the same, while in a 
few only was there an advance of one-tenth of a degree in the boiling 
liquid. The readings were made as rapidly as possible and with a 
magnifying glass. The barometric pressure was also carefully 
noted. 

Ethyl Nitrite, prepared according to i, 4 and 5, was tried in this 
manner. 

Ethyl Nitrite after No. i gave in the preliminary a boiling point of 
16.5° C, whilst that from Carey Leas' method gave 17° C. The 
mean average of all the determinations was 17° C, this compromises 
about 70 trials. 

To conclude- the boiling point determinations, some 6 ounces of 
freshly made Liebig's Ethyl Nitrite was subjected to fractional distilla- 
tion. 

The apparatus consisted of a Wurtz flask, connected by an adapter 
to a Mohrs' worm, which was surrounded with a freezing mixture. 
The heat, which was very gently applied to the flask, was sufiicient to 
keep the liquid in a state of constant ebullition, with the thermometer 
in the liquid, the same began boiling at 13.3° C, when the boiliog 



92 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

continued vigorously up the 16.3** C, it required eight minutes to reach 
this temperature, and i^ drams of liquid were obtained. 

The thermometer was now raised until the bnlb was ^ inch below 
the opening of the exit tube; it required 15 minutes to raise from 
16.5® C. to i6.6** C. At 16.7® C. it remained for 25 minutes, while it 
required an hour to reach above 16.8® C. Between the temperature 
16.3® to 16.8® C. one ounce was obtained. 

The rise in the temperature up to 16.9® required one hour, when it 
ran up to 17® C. 2 ounces had been obtained. The receiver was now 
changed, and lyi ounces were obtained at this temperature; at 17.2® 
C. all of the liquid had distilled over; the barometric pressure was 
758. 7 mm. Leas' JEthyl Nitrite. 

Treated in the same manner, started at 16.1^ C. and ran rapidly up 
to 17.3® C. and finished at 17.8® C. Barometric pressure 759.2 mm. 
Grosourdy's Ethyl Nitrite. 

At 760 mm. barometric pressure distilled between 19.38° C. and 
19.88° C. 

SPECIFIC GRAVITY. 

This was taken at O*' C. by means of a delicate Sprengel Pic- 
nometer. 

Liebig found the Specific gravity at 15** C. 
Brown " " '' 

Mohr '* " " 

Dumas & BouUay ** . " 

The mean of 6 determinations made 

Liebig's Ethyl Nitrite at 0° C. 
Leas' " " " 

This is using the Ethyl Nitrite before fractioning it. 

From the results of these experiments, I think it may be fair to con- 
clude : 

I St. That Ethyl Nitrite has, as yet, not been made colorless, and 
that it is light yellow. 

2d. That the boiling points 16® to 16.5° C. are probably too low, 
and that 18.5® — 21** C. are possibly too high; also, that the boiling 
point given by most French and some German works, 17** C, is the 
nearest correct. 



at 15- C. 


.947 


" 15.5° c. 


.900 


" I5;5^C. 


.898 


" 4°C. 


.886 




.919 




.920 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 93 

3d. The specific gravity of .947 at 15° C. is undoubtedly too high, 
as it has not been corroborated. That .886 at 14^ C. is too low, and 
that .900 at 15.5^ C. is nearest and about right. It is unfortunate that 
most of the authorities do not say which method was used to prepare 
the Ethyl Nitrite ; and it is here, without doubt, that most of the diffi- 
culity occurs, as the products of the several methods, although 
seemingly similar, when superficially examined, are very dissimilar 
when closely scrutinized. 

These experiments, which extended over a period of five months, 
were to have been concluded by determinations of vapor density, co- 
efficiency of expansion and specific gravity at the various temperatures, 
when they were cut short by the approach of warm weather. 



94 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



FERROUS CITRATE. 

CHAS. P. FENNEL, PH. G. 
Cincinnati, Ohia 



Query No. 28. — A practical formula is wanted for a solution ofFer* 

rous Citrate yieldeng by assay d.52 per cent. Ferric 
Oxide. 
In accepting the query, the writer presumed that the normal Fer- 
rous Citrate was intended and that the solution should contain 14.833 
per cent, of the anhydrous salt. In conformity with the system 
adopted in the Revision of the Pharmacopoeia the following formula, 
giving the most satisfactory results, might be considered the answer 
to the query. 

LIQUOR FERRO CITRATIS. 
(Solution of Ferrous Citrate.) 

An aqueous solution of Ferrous Citrate, (Fej 2 CjHjOt); -545.7 
containing 14.833 per cent, of the anhydrous salt. 

Barium Carbonate, one hundred and sixty parts, - - 160 

Citric Acid, one hundred and fourteen parts, - - - 114 

Ferrous Sulphate, two hundred and twenty-six parts, - - 226 

Distilled water, a sufficient quantity, 

To make one thousand parts, - - - 1000 

Put the various salts into a flask capable of holding the volume of 
the intended product. Pour upon them (500) five hundred parts of 
Distilled Water, agitate frequently, and let the mixture stand upon a 
hot water bath until effervescence ceases ; filter through paper into -a 
tared flask, and having rinsed the flask with a little boiling distilled 
water, pass the washings through the filter; Continue to pass boiling 
distilled water through the filter until the filtrate shall weigh one thous- 
and parts. 

Properties: A pale green liquid, odorless, having a slightly ferugi- 
nous taste, and an acid reaction. Specific Gravity 1.012. When evap- 
orated at a moderate heat to a syrupy consistence, and spread on 
plates of glass, it forms dark red scales. When completely incinerated, 
one hundred parts (100) pf solution will leave 6.52 parts of residue. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 95 

The solution is not precipitated, but only rendered darker by water of 
ammonia. The solution deprived of its iron, and the filtrate precipi- 
tated by test solution of Chloride of Calcium and heated, a white 
granular precipitate will be produced, which partially redissolved on 
cooling of the solution. On adding Test Solution of Ferrocyanide 
of Potassium, a very light blue precipitate is produced, which soon 
changes to dark blue. Test solution of Ferricyanide of Potassium 
produces a dark blue precipitate. The addition of Alcohol produces 
a light green precipitate, rapidly changing to dark red. 

Remarks : The double decomposition being explained by the fol- 
lowing equation : 

5 Ba C0,+ 2 H,CeH50, + 3 Fe So, =Fe3 2 C,ll,0,+s Ba So,+3 
H,0+3 CO,. 

Carbonic Acid Gas being removed by the aid of heat, (water bath), 
Barium Sulphate removed by filtration, and freed from all traces of 
Ferrous Citrate by boiling water. Freshly precipitated Barium Car- 
bonate will react more rapidly, but in its application, there must be a 
positive absence of the base of the precipitant, otherwise double salts 
will be formed, and furthermore, oxidation will be more rapid and 
complete, especially if ammonia be that base. 

The literature upon the subject of Ferrous Citrate being exceedingly 
meagre, the writer was induced to investigate the subject more thor- 
oughly. 

Theoretically three processes may be employed to obtain the same 
result, but which, when put to practical test, were found wanting and 
accompanied with unlocked for obstacles. 

Process I. Thus the action of Citric Acid on Iron filings, with 
the application of heat, and in the presence of a large and constant 
quantity of water will produce Ferrous Citrate. The process is slow 
and tedious, and therefore objectionable, since under the continued 
and combined influences of the atmosphere, water and heat, oxida- 
tion takes place; producing one or more of the numerous Ferroic 
Citrates; owing to its proneness to absorb Oxygen. In the first stage 
of the process, a dirty white, almost insoluble salt is formed, consist- 
ing of Di Ferrous Citrate, Fe, H.j 2 Cj H5 O7, Hj, O. This soon 
changes to slate color, bordering on pale green. As soon as this salt 
assumes a definite green color its solubility increases, owing to the 



96 OHIO STATS PHABMACBUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 

gentteXed Ferric condition of Iron. The presence of Iron in the 
FerrcHc condition being readily indicated by the test solution of Ferro 
and Ferricyanide of Potassium. Oxidation still further increases the 
rapidity of solution, until the color becomes apple green, which 
remains constant upon continued boiling, provided the quantity of 
water remains constant. Evaporated to S3Tupy consistence and 
spread on plates of glass, a scaly compound results, dark greenish red 
in color, insoluble in alcohol, slowly soluble in water. The reactions 
might be symbolized as follows : 

3 Fe,+4 H,QHA=Fe, 2 H, 2 QH5OT+2 H,+2Fe,+2 HjCeH^OT 
Fe,H, 2 CeHs07+2 Fe,+2 H,CeH50T= 2 Fe, 2 CeH50,+4 H,. 

4 Fe", 2 C,H50,+3 0,=Fe;" O, 4 C, H5O,. 

Process II. The application of Ferrous Hydrate or Ferrous Car- 
bonate in place of Iron Filings of Process I, Ferrous Hydrate and 
Ferrous Carbonate being still more mclined to the absorption of Oxy- 
gen can not be used for the preparation of the salt. The production 
of Ferric Citrate being in excess of Ferrous salt. 

Process III. Decomposition of a normal Citrate of the alkali 
metals with freshly prepared solution of Ferrous Chloride of definite 
strength. This method presents many difficulties, in as much as dou- 
ble salts are formed of various degrees of solubility, but all more or 
less green in color. 

Ammonium Citrate generated more heat, and the d^igree of oxida- 
tion was more rapid and complete. The salts formed were scaly, 
green to brown in color, depending upon the ammonia combined, the 
vapors of which were continually evolved during evaporation. The 
proper test solutions indicating Ferroic condition. The constitution 
of the salts could not be determined, but in all probability they are 
similar to the Potassium and Sodium salts. The Citrates of Potas- 
sium and Sodium yielded granular salts, green in color of various 
degrees of intensity and with no indication of Ferric salt. The 
Sodium salt being more definite in crystalline structure, the Potassium 
salt having a tendency to scale. Operating with definite quantities, 
the salts formed, indicated the following constitution. 

■e^ ^ f Sodium or ) Citrate and f Di Sodium or ) ^.. . 
Ferrous, | potassium j Ferrous { Di Potassium, j ^"'*'^- 



OBIO STATE PHASMACSUnCAL 'ASSOCIATION. 97 

The reacticms being represented by the following symbols : 

2 K,C6H50t+2 Fe Cl,= 2 Fe KCeH50T.H30+4 K CI. 
2 Na,C6H50T+2 Fe Cl,= 2 Fe Na QH^Ot-HjO+s Na CI. 
2 KaCeHjO^+Fe Cl,=Fe K, 2 C^HJO,. 2 H,0+2 K CI. 
2 NasCeHjOT+Fe Cl,=Fe Na^ 2 C^njd,. 2 H,0+2 Na CI. 

Process IV. Decomposition of a normal Citrate of the metals of 
the alkaline earths Ferrous sulphate. Barium and Calcium Citrate 
will both answer the purpose admirably, but Barium salt is prefera- 
ble, since in the process of washing the precipitate formed the Barium 
salt is insoluble, while the Calcium salt is partially so, and therefore 
contaminates the final product. The Citrates prepared from freshly 
precipitated carbonates, containing traces of the precipitants. Ammo- 
nium, Sodium or Potassium, respectively, will produce dark green 
solutions with Ferrous sulphate. The intensity of the color depend- 
ing upon the quantity of impurity present, for the reason explained 
under 3d process. In conclusion, it is therefore essential that in the 
preparation of Ferrous Citrate, according to the given formula from 
Barium Carbonate, that the latter be free from the alkali metals. 
Secondly — The Ferrous Sulphate should be pale green, insuring the 
absence of Ferric salt, and be free from traces of efflorescence. Citric 
Acid usually meets the requirements of the Pharmacopoeia, and needs, 
therefore, no further caution. The Distilled Water should be as free 
as possible of atmospheric air. The preparation should- be conducted 
as rapidly as is consistent with the process of deconftposition, and the 
final product should be excluded from light, and kept in well closed 
and filled bottles to insure its preservation. 



9^ OHtO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



POWDERED JALAP AND RESIN. 

E. H. W. STAHLHUTH, PH G., 
Cincinnati, O. 



Query No. 12,— Does Jalap entire and Powdered as at pnseni supplied, 

contain the required percentage of Eesin 9 

The United States Pharmacopoeia requires that Jalap shall contain 
12 per cent of resin, and not more than 10 per cent of which shall 
be soluble in ether. The resin being the active constituent, should 
be abundant The resin which is soluble in ether, being the griping 
principle, should be in small proportions. 

Fourteen samples of powdered Jalap were obtained in bulk, indi- 
rectly from wholesale houses and jobbers, in the cities named Five 
kinds of entire Jalaps were examined, which differed very much in 
general appearance. The entire drug was powdered until all of it 
passed through a No. 70 sieve. 

PROCESS OF VALUATION. 

Ten grams (xo gm.) of the drug was exhausted by percolation with 
94 per cent, alcohol. THe percolator, ^ inch diameter, was fitted 
with cotton and filter paper ; the lower orifice fitted with a rubber 
tube closed with a spring clip, and the percolator half filled with 
alcohol. The powder was then gradually poured on the alcohol. As 
the powder became moistened, it dropped to the bottom of the 
percolator. This insured perfect moistening and prevented the loss 
which would occur if moistened in the usual way. The powder was 
allowed to macerate for twenty-four hours, when percolation was 
allowed to proceed. The percolate was allowed to flow into a tared 
100 c.c. flask until it came up to the 100 c.c. mark. The first 50 cc. 
of percolate passed contains all of the soluble portion of the drug . 
exhaustion was therefore complete. 

The resulting tincture was thoroughly mixed, and with a pipette 
10 c.c. of it, representing one grain of drug, measured into a small 
tared flask. The pipette was rinsed with alcohol and rinsings allowed 
to flow back into the flask containing 90 c.c. of tincture, represent- 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 99 

ing 9 gms. of drug. The alcohol in this flask was distilled off on a 
water-bath until the contents were reduced to about 9 c.c. Eighty 
(80) c.c. of warm distilled water jas then gradually poured into the 
flask, with constant agitation, and the resin allowed to precipitate. 
When the supernatant liquid had become perfectly clear, it was 
decanted and 20 c.c. of warm water again added, the resin thoroughly 
washed in it allowed to deposit and the supernatant liquid drained 
off". The flask was then heated on a water-bath until vapors ceased 
to be evolved, and dessication completed over sulphuric acid. The 
flask being removed from the dessicator, and from time to time the 
resin scraped loose with a wire, and triturated to a powder with a 
glass rod and replaced in the dessicator until dehydrated. The flask 
with contents was then weighed and the per cent, oi total resin 
calculated. Ten (10) c.c, of re-distilled ether, sp. gr., .720, was then 
poured into the flask, the resin thoroughly triturated allowed to 
deposit, and the ether solution decanted. This process was repeated 
four successive times, using the same quantity of ether each time- 
The flask with contents was then dried as before, weighed, and the 
Jalapin calculated by diflerence* The alcohol in the flask, containing 
the equivalent of one (i) grain of drug, was distilled off on a water- 
bath, the flask with residue dried as before ; weighed, and the per 
cent, of alcohol extract calculated. 

Owing to the delicate constitutions of the two Jalap resins, ah acid 
was not used to accellerate the precipitation. Water alone being 
used, the precipitation was necessarily tedious, requiring at an aver- 
age about four weeks* timei The resin precipitated in a honey-like 
mass. One hundred (100) c.c. of water will probably not remove all 
of the constituents of the alcoholic solution of nine (9) grams of 
Jalap soluble therein ; the result given would therefore appear to be 
too high, but as the resins of Jalap are not absolutely insoluble in 
water, the one error is probably nearly corrected by the other. The 
convolvulin being absolutely insoluble in ether, it is not affected by 
the large quantity of ether used in washing it from the Jalapin. The 
process of evaporation, precipitation, dessication and weighing having 
been conducted within the same flask, there was consequently no 
error caused by spurting, sticking to vessels, or accumulation of 
dust. As all samples were treated in the same manner, with the 



• ••• 






lOO OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASaOCIATJON, 

same quantities of water and ether, the comparative valuation is 
probably correct. The samples having been procured indirectly from 
the source of supply, they represent the state of the market nearer 
than if obtained through the retail trade. 

DESCRIPTION OF ENTIRE JALAP. 

No. 15. — Oblong tubers, hard and heavy, weight, }4 ^o ij4 oz.; 
larger tubers hollow in center; sp. gr. 1.28; dark brown externally, 
longitudinally wrinkled, light transverse warts. Internally very dark, 
very resinous fracture, almost conchoidal. 

No. 1 6. — Irregular, shriveled and contorted; various shapes and 
sizes ; weight 20 grs. to j4 oz.; externally, light brown ; longitudinally 
wrinkled, but no transverse warts; internally, light gray; tough, 
horny fracture. Some pieces had a high sp. gr., while others floated 
on water; sp. gr. of the whole, 1.22. 

No. 17. — Oblong tubers, compact and plump; weight, i to i}4 oz.; 
sp* gr., 1. 16; externally, light to dark brown; scarcely wrinkled 
longitudinally; covered with transverse warts; internally, nearly 
white ; very starchy fracture. 

No. 1 8, ^Oblong pyriform, compact and hard; weight, ^ to i oz.; 
sp. gr., 1.34; externally dark-brown; longitudinally wrinkled; trans- 
verse warts; internally, varying from light to dark-gray; fracture 
resinous. 

No. 19. — Irregular, much broken, shrunken and somewhat porous 
pieces ; weight, J^ to 1 oz.; larger tubers sliced longitudinally; very 
dark-brown externally, with lighter transverse warts; internally, 
nearly black; very brittle; fracture resinous and conchoidal; sp. 
gr., 1. 17. 

All of these five samples produced the characteristic irritating 
sensation in the nose and throat during pulverization. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



lOI 



RESULTS. 



Sample 
Number. 



From City. 



I 

2 

3 

^ • • • • • 

5 

6. . . . i 

7 

8 

9 

lO 

II 

a2 • • • • 

14 

15 

i6 

17 

i8 

19 



Columbus 

Kansas City.... 
Cincinnati . . . . . 

Cleveland 

New York . . . 
Indianapolis ... 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

New York 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Columbus 

Cincinnati 

Entire 

Entire 

Entire. 

Entire 

Entire 

Average 

Standard 



Per cent. 
Toul Resin. 



S.85 
6 16 
6.62 
7.00 
7.60 
8.45 

8.53 
8.55 

9.23 
9.29 

12.04 

1351 
14.03 

14.32 
7.66 

8.03 

9.21 
12.07 

15.59 



Per cent, of 

Resin dissolved 

by Ether. 



Percent. 
Alcohol Ex- 
tract. 



9.67 
12.00 



11.57 
10.27 
12.91 

15.39 
9.65 

11.69 

17.83 

10.52 

6.01 

13.51 
15.67 

11.59 

7.02 

8.68 
6.21 
9.12 
8.32 
8.21 

5.63 



10.51 
10.00 



16.5 
165 
17.8 
14.2 

17.9 
16.8 

177 
15.6 
22.6 

165 
18.7 

19.7 

23.9 
224 

15.5 
13.9 
11.2 

16.3 
21.9 



Per cent. 

of Resin in 

Extract. 



17.66 
20.00 



35-45 
37.32 

37.18 
49.29 

42.45 
50.29 

48.18 

54.80 

40.83 

56.29 

64.36 

68.57 

58.70 

63.92 

49.41 

57.75 
82.22 

74.04 

71.18 



45.84 
60.00 



* • t • *• 






102 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

CONCLUSION. 

The facts brought out by this work show that Jalap entire and 
powdered, as at present supplied, is variable in quality ; a very good 
and a very poor drug is on the market, the extremes being 5.85 and 
15.59 percentage of resin constituent. They also show that the 
quality of this resin is variable, containing from 5.63 to 17.83 per 
cent, of Jalapin. Jalap should, therefore, be assayed as well as any 
drug, the active constituent of which, varies. The process of assay 
employed by the writer, although believed to be as accurate as any 
that may be devised, is too tedious for practical purposes. A better 
and more speedy method is in demand. The percentage of alcohol 
extract, although larger in good than poor Jalap, does not give an 
idea of the percentage of resin, and this is not a reliable means of 
ascertaining the quality of the drug. 

The extract itself is variable in quality, and should be assayed for 
its resin and made to contain 60 per cent, of resin, representing five 
times its weight of drug of standard quality. It is the writers' opin- 
ion that the quality of the extract varies with the stage of growth ; 
when the tuber is young it contains considerable starch, which being 
insoluble in alcohol, the per cent, of extract is small, but this extract 
is very rich in resin. At a more advanced stage of growth, when the 
starch is partially or entirely converted into sugar, which is soluble 
in alcohol, the tuber yields a larger per cent, of extract, but this is not 
so rich in resin. When the tuber approaches maturity, the percentage 
of extract is increased as well as its resin constituent It is probable 
that at a certain stage of growth the extract is nearly pure resin. As 
Jalap owes its virtues to its resin, and as the resin which is soluble in 
ether is an undesirable constituent, and as Jalap, as well as the resin, 
is so variable in quality, why is it not advisable to employ only the 
convolvulin, or the resin which has been treated with ether? This 
resin is not hygroscopic and the dose is constant, three (3) grains of 
it representing twenty-five (25) grains of good Jalap; 

Nature probably never intended that Jalap should be administered 
without first changing its character, any more than that man should 
eat a potato before it is cooked. Nature gives the material, and it is^ 
man's, (in this case the pharmacist's,) duty to prepare that material,. 






- •- k« b ^^» 



:V: ••:.: .^ 



J 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 103 

to remove undesirable constituents and to change the product so as to 
moderate any unpleasant effect. This is a point which may deserve 
a little more investigation by the fraternity. 

Prof. Lloyd — Mr. President. This paper is of unusual interest. 

I know that the writer of the paper has been to much trouble and has 

been very careful in his .work, and it calls to our attentton the fact 

that so common a drug as jalap is certainly open to inspection, or 

should be, as well as cinchona or other drugs of that kind. I was 

astonished when I went over these figures and reflected upon the 

differences in jalap. Probably those of us who are acquainted with 

the crude material are aware of the fact that jalap at the present 

time is not as large and firm and heavy as it was in former years^ 

that the bulbs are very much smaller than they were, and that with 

the decrease in the price of jalap there seems to have also been a 

decrease in the value of the jalap we get, and in the uniformity of it. 

It is not the same as it was formerly, and those who powder jalap 

have trouble in getting good jalap to powder. I think that this paper 

shows us that not only is poor powdered jalap on the market, but 

also poor crude jalap, and that the low grade of the powdered jalap 

cannot be altogether due to adulterations. In fact, on the contrary, 

it is shown, I think, by the averages, that there is nearly as much 

difference in the crude as there is in the powdered, and possibly it 

may be that all of this powdered jalap is made of different qualities 

of real jalap. But I would also call your attention, gentlemen, to 

the fact that some years ago a spurious jalap appeared on the market 

and excited considerable comment in this country. I do not know 

that there is much of it here now. Perhaps Dr. Lyons can enlighten 

us on that subject. 

Dr. Lyons — I am not able to give any information on that point, as 
to whether that spurious jalap is to be had, as I have not met with it -, 
but it is very certain that much of the crude jalap is far below the 
Pharmacopoeial standard. I am not sure but that the standard is 
a little high. Pharmacists are obliged to use many preparations of 
drugs, manufactured they know not how, they know not with what 
skill ; but here is an instance where they find differences or defects 
in the crude drug itself, and my own experience tallies very well with 
that of the writer of this paper, that even crude tubers as we meet 



104 ^^^^ STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ABaOCIATION 

them in the market, whether they have been tampered with or other- 
wise, are frequently as low in resin as from ten to eight per cont 

Prof. Coblentz — A few years ago I had occasion to examine a 
number of samples of both powdered and crude jalap, and I found 
as much variation in the crude as in the powdered. Some of the 
samples of crude jalap were found to have been soaked — that is, they 
were sticky on the outside, and had all indications of having been 
soaked in alcohol previous to being thrown on the market, and that 
may account in some cases for the low amount of resin found. 
Other samples, that were probably gathered too early, appeared as 
though worm-eaten ; they were spongy in texture. I think you will 
find that there will be just as much variation in the crude jalap as in 
the powdered, and in aU probability the drug-dealers have been fair 
and honest in this particular. They have powdered the drug as they 
bought it on the market, thinking all the time that as it was a true 
jalap it could be thrown on the market I think that the drug-dealers 
are not to blame in the least for this variation. 

Prof. Lloyd — Mr, President, I would call the attention of our 
Association to the fact that probably a considerable amount of impure 
jalap is thrown on the market now that we did not get in the olden 
time because the small size of the tubers indicate that it is gathered 
earlier and that it has not reached its purity. I would suggest that 
the Committee on Papers and Queries introduce a query as to the 
variation that exists between large bulbs and small ones, between old 
and young jalap. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 105 



BLACK OXIDE OF MANGANESE. 

BY S. W. McKEOWN. 
Youngstown O. 



Query No. 33. — Is not much of the Black Oxide of Manganese offered 

for sale largely adulterated? Test the present mar- 
ket supply for ualue in pure Binoxide, 

The commercial Black Oxide of Manganese is a mixture of the 
binoxide of the metal and one or two lower oxides, together with 
such impurities as silica, alumina, oxide of iron, baryta lime, mag- 
nesia, etc. The purest binoxide of manganese found in nature is a 
mineral called pyrolusite. There are probably at least three oxides 
found in the commercial article, namely ; binoxide (Mn O,) sesqui 

oxide (Mn, Oj) and protoxide (Mn O). 

The first is of nearly a black color, the second is brown, and the 

third has a greenish hue. 

The Pharmacopoeia requires that black oxide of manganese shall 
contain at least 66 per cent, pure binoxide, and that 5 grams shall be 
sufficient, when boiled with dilute hydrochloric acid, to completely oxi- 
dize 2 1 grams ferrous sulphate, the latter to be added to the cold mix- 
ture before boiling. The fact however that 5 grams of the sample does 
oxidize 21 grams ferrous sulphate, does not prove it to contain 66 
per cent, of pure binoxide, for the reason that the sesquioxide also 
gives up one third of its oxygen, and therefore counts for a certain 
amount of binoxide. For instance, if the sample under examination 
contains 60 per cent, only of pure binoxide, and 1 1 per cent, of 
sesquioxide it will furnish the required amount of oxygen and be 
equivalent \.o 66 per cent, of binoxide. 

Four samples of black oxide of manganese were subjected to the 
above test. The amounts of Mn O2 indicated were 70.00, 69.80, 
67,40, and 62.25 per cent. One only fell below the Pharmacopoeia 
standard. A quantitative analysis of each specimen gave the follow- 
ing results : 



io6 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION,, 



Binoxide Manganese 

Monoxide Manganese 

Silicious Water 

Oxide Iron, ^ 
Alumina, J 

Baryta. 

Lime 

Magnesia 

Water and Loss 

Totals 

Metallic Manganese . . 



62 25 
6.95 

324 

3-99 

1352 
.70 

•34 
9 01 



100 



44.74 



70.00 

1341 
5.72 

3.24 

1. 14 

1.50 

•45 

4-54 



100 
54.64 



69.80 

3.61 
8.76 

4.58 

366 
Traces. 
Traces. 

9 59 



100 
46.92 



67.40 
6.25 

2.35 
3.90 

3- 40 
3-86 

1.80 

11.04 



100 
47.44 



It is my opinion that little if any of the present market supply is 
adultered, although the amount of natural impurities in many in- 
stances may be such as(,to greatly lessen its value. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 07 



AMYL NITRITE. 

W. SIMONSON, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Query No. 34. — Samples of Nitrite of Amyl have been found nearly 

free from the nitrous radical ; what ts the percent- 
age of absolute Amyl Nitfite, (QH^i ^0>^,) in 
• the best specimens of commercial Amyl Nitrite and 
how near a pure nitrite should a medicinal article 
approach ? 
The Pharmacopoeia gives a good description of the properties of 
this substance, tests for the identity of its parts, and fixes the limit 
of acidity, but does not name the process by which it should be 
prepared nor adopt a standard of strenejth. The objects in answering 
this query are to show the average percentages of total nitrites, Calcu- 
lated as Amyl Nitrite, in the commercial article, thus determining the 
limit of strength practicable to adopt, to compare the results obtained 
by the assaying with those gotten by fractional distillation, and to 
verify the statement that this substance should be the product of 
the reaction between nitrous acid gas and well purified amyl alcohol. 

ESTIMATION OF AMYL NITRITE. 

Whenever this term is used, the statement refers to total nitrites 
calculated as Amyl Nitrite, C5H11 NO2 = 1x7. In such a complex 
mixture as the commercial article, one nitrite, or two or more nitrites, 
may be, and probably are, present. The method of assay is that of 
Allen, described in Commercial Organic Analysis, p. 1^0-151, and 
detailed fully in the Proceedings of this Association for 1886. 

Forty-one packages, from seven makers, were examined by this 
method for percentage of Amyl Nitrite, and subjected to the officinal 
tests. The results of the work are shown in the following table in 
which the first three are arranged in the order of the supposed 
quantity used, nothing being known concerning the remainder, except 
that the seventh, being the production of a foreign maker of the 
highest reputation, is probably well distributed. If the two samples 
fairly represented other markets, our supply, from two domestic 
makers, is unequaled in strength and quality. According to the 
estimate of the dealers from whom material was obtained. No. i 



io8 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



supplies from sixty to ninety per cent, of the quantity consumed, yet 
it is the poorest of all those having a very large sale. 



I 



a 

9 



Per cent. 

Total 

Nitrites as 

Ca Hn NO, 



Sp. Gr. at 

15' C 

(Water at 

15° C=z,ooo. 



Boilinic 
Point. 



Total 

Acidity 

asHNOs 



Water (in 35 Gm.) 



Color. 



B.. 



C. 



D. 

E . 

F.. 
G. 



I 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 
II 
12 

13 

14 

I 

2 



5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 

ij 

12 

13 
I 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
I 

2 

I 

2 
I 
I 

2 



13-31 
13.44 

13.05 
20.76 

22.2 

19.98 

13-71 
23.40 

12.00 

23 29 

18.78 

14.22 

17.31 
14.21 

84.0 
85.3 
85.0 

85.0 

84.0 
86.9 

84.5 
86.5 

85.77 

79.43 
96.00 

83." 
85.6 

75.36 

73.85 
75.6 

834 
76.5 
82.70 

74.21 

390 
46.2 

00.0 

00.0 

65.31 
67.73 
66.73 



.8550 



.8541 
.8588 
.8500 

.8519 
.8548 

.8517 
.8540 

.8531 
.8552 

.8531 
.8454 
.8778 
.8746 

.8767 

.8746 

.8750 
.8760 
.8780 
.8760 
.8760 
.8781 
.8814 
.8814 
.8765 
.8822 

.8830 
.8822 
.8800 
.8822 
.8800 

.8831 
.8613 

•^557 
.8882 

1.003 

.8844 

.8830 

.8830 



Trace 



Very pale 
Yellow. 



^ 70" C. 

rising 
irregu- 
larly to 
128° Q. 



I 



•57 % 



I 



87' C. 

Very 

soon 

constant 

at 96** C. 



^ 86** C. 
gradual- 
ly rising 

^ to96'*C. 
then 
constant 



.23% 



. . • . . 



O. O.. 

I to 2 minims . . . 
Few min. drops. 
Few min. drops. 

0.0 

O 

Few min. drops. 
Few min. drops. 

^ minim 

O 



Few min. drops. 
About X minim . 
\ Very few min^ 
J drops 

iVery few min. 
drops ...[drop^ 
Very few min. 



Few min. drops . 
Few min. drops. 
Few min. drops. 
Few min. drops. 

0.0 

Few min. drops. 



Few min. drops. 

About ^ minim. 
About I minim. . 
Few min. drops. 
Few min. drops. 
Few min. drops. 

About ^ minim 
Few mm. drops . 

O.. 

Few min. drops. 
About }4 minim 
About 2 minims. 
Few min. drops. 
0.0 



Pale yel. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. I Op 

**SP. GR. .872 TO 874." 

The specific gravities given in the table were taken at i5°C, the 
standard volume being water measured at the same temperature. 
The specific gravity of pure Amyl Nitrite is' given variously, as 
between .877 and .902, the temperature of the standard volume and 
that at weighing, being unknown. Of commercial specimens. No. 1 1 
B, nearly pure, had sp. gr. .8814, but the influence of the small diluent 
is unknown; those of C, next in purity, varied between .8800 and 
.8831, the higher sp. gr. going with the lower strength; those of 
C4 lowest in purity between .856 and .845, lower sp. gr. usually 
followed by lower strength. No. i-E, sp. gr. .8882 contained little 
more than. a trace of nitrite. A specimen prepared by this operator 
for this paper, brought by careful fractional distillation to a constant 
boiling pomt and believed to be nearly free from other nitrites and 
amyl ethers, had sp. gr. 0. 88135. 

If sp. gr. of amyl alcohol, forming the largest part of the diluent in 
most specimens, be taken as .818 and that of amyl nitrite as .8814, 
then sp. gr. .874 would indicate a mixture containing 88 per cent, or 
less of pure amyl nitrite, and sp. gr. 872 to one containing about 85 
per cent, or less. But sp. gr. of nearly all commercial samples can 
be no indication of strength, since other amyl ethers are present, 
especially if made by the nitric acid conversion. 

**IT BOILS AT ABOUT 96°C." 

The statements of the books on the boiling point are more con- 
flicting than those on the specific gravity. The boiling points of the 
first three brands given in the table were obtained by using 4 — 5 C.c. 
contained in a narrow test tube, about i2" c. m. long, fitted with a 
cork carrying a short delivery tube directed upward, and a correct 
thermometer, the bulb being just above the surface of the boiling 
liquid, which was heated by an oil-bath. The boiling point was taken 
at that temperature at which air had been driven out of the tube, and 
ether vapor had just begun to escape by the delivery tube. 

In taking the boiling point of the c6mmercial nitrite, always of very 
complex composition, more useful results are obtained by using about 
15 C.c. of the sample, the containing tube being of such capacity as 
to leave the smallest allowable space between liquid and cork. The 



no OHIO STATS PHABMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

presence of fractions boiling much below 96^0., unless present in 
a small and unobjectionable quantity, may then be shown, as these 
will not have been boiled off before the time of reading the tem- 
perature. 

The specimen of Amyl Nitrite prepared for this paper was vapor- 
ized completely at gS^C, the temperature rising slightly and suddenly 
at the close as the vapor from the last few drops became overheated 
by the bath. 

ACIDITY, 

'<0n shaking 10 C.c. ol Nitrite of Amyl with 2 C.c. of a mixture of 
one part of water of ammonia and nine parts of water, the liquid 
should not redden blue litmus paper, (limit of free acid,)" correspond- 
ing to .63 per cent. H NO,. In performing this test the dilute 
ammonia is best measured into a tube holding little more than the entire 
mixture, to exclude air, the nitrite then poured m and the tube closed 
by a cork bearing a small piece of litmus paper. If the paper is blue 
after shaking, the excess of alkali can be estimated, and, by difference, 
the acidity calculated. The results by this method are very constant, 
if not accurate. All samples of A were much above the limit, due 
to exposure in making other tests, those of B slightly above one-half 
the limit, and those of C about the same as A. A freshly opened 
package of A gave .57 per cent. H NO,; B .23 per cent., and C not 
estimated for lack of material. 

ABSENCE OF WATER. 

It should remain transparent, or nearly so, when exposed to the 
temperature of melting ice, (absence of water.) The results shown 
in the table were obtained by exposing the vials to a bath of ice-water 
for eight hours and then noting the quantity of water separated. 
Very few specimens stood this test absolutely, but only in a few cases 
did it exceed about one-half minim. The test does not prove the 
absence of water unless the sample is rich in Amyl Nitrite, and con- 
tains but a small proportion of amyl alcohol. Thus, No. 8 A yielding 
no trace of water, when distilled gave over two, per cent, with 
fractions under 9o°C. and fully three per cent, below ioo°C. The 
presence of water is properly considered to increase decomposition, 
and, as it appears impossible to separate it, in the presence of amyl 
alcohol, by cooling to 0°C., a well made preparation should contain 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. Ill 

but little unaltered alcohol, and a close limit might be placed by 
increasing the required specific gravity so as to be "from 0.878 to 
0.881." 

FRACTIONAL DISTILLATION. 

Results obtained by the assay process give no indication of the 
quality of the substance examined, but refer simply to total nitrites. 
Further knowledge of the composition of the liquid may be obtained 
by fractional distillation. The apparatus used for this work consisted 
of a wide-necked distilling flask, holding about 800 C.c. , on which 
was mounted a five-bulb Henninger tube the delivery of which was 
connected securely with a small bent tube passing through a bath of 
ice-water and vertically into the tared receiving flasks, also cooled by 
ice-water. The fractionating tube was not supplied with cups of 
gauze, as these could not be obtained in time for the first distillation, 
and it was necessary to treat all by an uniform process. This defect 
was compensated as far as possible by very slow distillation, the ratio 
between distillate and flow-back being about on-e to twenty, or more, 
and seldom rising to one to ten. Separations effected under these 
conditions are very incomplete, and the chief value of the work has 
been to establish a series of boiling points and note the proportion of 
distillate obtained between successive temperatures, together with the 
assay values and specific gravities of the fractions. 

This ether is described by some experimenters as having a constant 
boiling point, and by others as beginning to boil at about 90 ®C, the tem- 
perature passing to ioo°C, or beyond. According to Allen, (Com. 
Org. Analysis, p. 160,) *'a fairly pure article will yield fully 80 per 
cent, of its original measure between po^C and ioo°C, and ^should 
leave no very considerable residue at the latter temperature. * * * 
Incomplete distillation at ioo°C is due chiefly to the presence of 
amyl alcohol, heavy traces of which may apparently be formed by 
partial decomposition of the nitrite during distillation. Hence, com- 
mercial Amyl Nitrite of good quality may leave a residue of 5 to 10 
per cent, at ioo°C." 

425 Gm. of A, 445 Gm. of B and 440 Gm. of C, were fraction- 
ated under the described conditions. The data so obtained are set 
forth in the following tables. In distilling B, the process had to be 
hastened somewhat and the separation is less perfect than it would 
have been could more time have been allowed. 



I 



112 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



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OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 1 13 

It will be noted that all nitrites distilled or were carried over below 
90 °C, the following fraction containing but a trace. 

The fraction collected between po^C and ioo°C, amounted to less 
than 5 per cent. The exact amount is unknown because the fraction- 
ating tube broke at 93 °C, involving a slight loss by escape of vapor, 
and a greater loss by transferring. But the fraction had not the 
characteristic effect on the head, and its vapor was quite colorless. 



114 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 



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OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 1 5 

This specimen gave less than 6 per cent, distillate below 90° C, fully 
80 per cent, between 90° apd ioo°C, leaving at this temperature less 
than 15 per cent, of residue, and this, consisting in small part, of 
Amyl Nitrite, might have been reduced by slower distillation. The 
principal part of this residue appears to have been amyl alcohol. 



ii6 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 



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OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



117 



This specimen is known to have been prepared by the nitric acid 
conversion. 

The high sp. gr. of all these fractions proves the absence of much 
amyl alcohol. 

Fraction 4, 94°C to 97 °C, having greatest physiological effect, 
assayed but 91. i per cent., the diluent in great part valeric aldehyde. 
The presence of this substance shows the greatest defect of the nitric 
acid process, and the great difficulty or impossibility of making a 
pure article by this means. 

The results may be compared as follows : 



Make. 


Distillate 
below 90° C. 


QO'C. 

to 100° C 


Above 100° C. 


Total. 


Loss. 


A 

B 

C 


23.2 

5 75 
8.35 


About 5.0 
801 
71.1 


67.6 

1305 
15.65 


95.8 

^98.9 
99.1 


4.2 
I.I 

9 



These results show that of two domestic brands of Amyl Nitrite of 
fairly good quality, one is made from very well purified amyl alcohol, 
or is carefully fractioned from the crude nitrite, and the second from 
a moderately well purified alcohol, or is but imperfectly fractioned 
from the first-found nitrite. But one brand, and that is certainly the 
one most largely sold, is evidently made from a very impure amyl 
alcohol, and is also put on the market unrectified. The mixture is 
scarcely fit for medicinal use, and this may account in part for the 
neglect into which the article has fallen. 

Respecting the preparation of this body, authors usually quoted are 
at variance and are contradictory, but the weight of authority is in 
favor of some form of the nitrous acid method, and, more recently, 
Williams and Smith have shown the necessary details for obtaining the 
largest yield and the purest product. (Pharm. Jour, and Trans., Dec. 



1 1 8, OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 

12, 1885; Am. Jour. Farm., Jan., 1886.) They recommend acting 
on purified amyl alcohol with the gas given off by reaction between 
arsenious oxide and nitric acid of sp. gr. 1.350 to 1.360, the alcohol 
being kept cool throughout the process. By this method was pre- 
pared a quantity of crude Amyl Nitrite. The retort is partly filled 
with arsenious oxide in coarse powder which is covered with diluted 
nitric acid containing 54 per cent, of absolute nitric acid. The mixture 
is gently heated and the evolved gas, not warmer than 3o**C as it 
leaves the retort, passes into a large empty bottle, becpming further 
cooled and depositing a small quantity of liquid carried over from 
the retort. The tall, narrow cylinder is not more than three-fourths 
filled with amyl alcohol, and the heat is so regulated as to keep a 
slow stream of bubbles passing through it. 

Much difficulty was found in getting an alcohol suited for preparing 
the nitrite. Most of that met with appeared like tailings of the 
rectification of fusel oil. The best commercial specimen obtainable 
had sp. gr. .8181, and boiling point, (taken on too small a quantity,) 
i25°C to 132^0. Appearing to be well rectified it was used without 
further purification, but afterward proved to have been very impure.. 
i8|^ ozs. of this alcohol, nitrified by the process described, yielded 
24 ozs. or 96 per cent, of the theoretical yield. After regulating the 
heat, the process went on with only occasional inspection and this to 
stop the work on appearance of the olive-green color, which indicates 
complete conversion. This product assayed 103.7 P^' cent. Amyl 
Nitrite, and after washing with two volumes of 20 per cent, solution 
of sodium carbonate, gave, in two assays, 102.2 and 101.9 per cent. 
Rectified in an ordinary retort fitted with a good thermometer and 
well connected with a Liebig condenser, 11 per cent, came over under 
9o®C, 75 per cent, between 9o°Cand 97^*0, leaving a residue of 1.2 
per cent, with a loss of 2.8 per cent 

Fraction under 9o"C had sp. gr. .8869, and assayed 107.5 P^^ c^^*- 
Amyl Nitrite ; washed with sodium carbonate solution and cooled to- 
0°C to separate water, it had sp. gr. .8843 and assayed 107.6 per 
cent. Amyl Nitrite. 

The small residue remaining at 97 ^C, 1.2 per cent., assayed 1.91 
per cent Amyl Nitrite, but sp. &;r. could not be taken with any useful 
accuracy. The 90^0-97 ®C fraction, washed with sodium carbonate: 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 



119 



solution and cooled to 0°Cfor 12 hours, separated from about 500 
Gm. of ether about 2 C.c. of water. It then had a pale yellow color, 
was free from nitrous odor, had sp. gr, .8818, and assayed 101.12 per 
cent. Amyl Nitrite. Both assay value and sp. gr. showing the 
presence of nitrites of lower molecular weight, perhaps of lower 
alcohols. A quantity of the ether was next examined by fractional 
distillation, using 414 Gm. Results appear in the following table : 



I20 



OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 





i 


S. 


1 V 


V 


V 


V 


V 








1 


age ^1 


ry pal 
range. 




ry pal 
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owly, and about one- 
at of pure Ether. 


1 

s 

i 


uickly, but much less 
t of Amyl Nitrite. 


Dg from that of pure 
Ether. 


ore slowly than from 
differing in kind. 


till more slowly, not 
iring in kind. 








itained si 
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OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 121 

Fraction one was lost at once by breakage, hence its properties 
could not be determined, but in the following ones sp. gr. remained 
nearly constant until No. 5 gave .88135. The assay values fell 
gradually until 5 gave as near 100 per cent, as the method will 
indicate. 

The results of this experiment show that the product of the manu- 
facturing process consisted of but little other than nitrites, the 
impurity being in very small proportion. As they also showed the 
probable presence of nitrites of lower alcohols, the remainder of 
supply of amyl alcohol was examined by distillation, and as was 
expected, the liquid proved to be very complex. Eight per cent, 
passed betweed 90^0 and 105°, sp. gr. .857; 32.5 between ii3°C 
and i27®C, sp. gr. .8134; and 52 between i27°C and 129^0, sp. gr. 
.8154, leaving a residue of 7.3, sp. gr. .8170, which probably would 
have distilled under 133^0. 

It would thus appear that pure amyl alcohol of constant boiling 
point will yield a nearly pure Amyl Nitrite, also of constant boiling 
point, and that that temperature is 96°C, the sp. gr. being about 
.8813— .8814. 

Owing CO lack of material to prove this supposition, the subject is 
left for the present and may form a note for the next meeting. 

In view of the facts shown in the foregoing paragraphs, it would 
seem that the Pharmacopoeia recognizes an Amyl Nitrite far from 
pure, and much less pure than one^ domestic brand, and still less pure 
than the specimen prepared for the purposes of this paper. ''When 
freely exposed to the air, it leaves a large residue of amyl Alcohol," 
does not apply to either, the former leaving but a small residue at 
end of five hours, and the latter scarcely more than an oily film 
when 10° C.c. of each was exposed in watch-glasses. Specific 
gravity is much too low, allowing a large admixture of amyl alcohol, 
and vapor is never more than transiently orange colored from a good 
article, very soon becoming very pale orange or nearly colorless, 
unless seen in depth of about one metre. The limit of acidity is far 
above the commercial specimen just referred to, and still farther 
above what is easily possible. Considering the great ease with which 
the substance can be prepared by the method detailed, excluding 
amyl alcohol entirely, including other ethers only in traces, and 



122 



OHIO STATE PHABMACSUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



having for greatest impurity certain nitrogen oxides almost entirely 
removed by process ot purification — from these it would ai>pear 
advisable to include a quantitative test that should require a nearly 
absolute ether, to lower the limit of acidity very much, and raise sp. 
gr. to be 0.878 to 0.881." These tests, with a closer definition of 
method of taking the boiling point, would describe and require a 
much better article, and these requirements could easily be met by 
manufacturers of the commercial ether. 



OHIO STATE PHABMACEOTICAL ASSOCIATION. _ 123 



ACT OF INCORPORATION. 



The andersigned, residents of the State of Ohio, Sylvester S. West, Lewis C. 
Hopp, George H. Fenner, Nathan Rosen wasser, A. Mayell and William F. Spieth, 
do hereby certify that we desire to form a corporation and become incorporated 
under and pursuant to the laws of the State of Ohio, and especially as provided and 
prescribed in Sections 3235 and 3236, and the following Sections of Title 2, Chap- 
ter I, of the Revised Statutes of Ohio, which took effect January I, 1880. 

Article i. The name by which we desire to be known is The Ohio State 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

Art. 2. Said Association to meet annually, at such place as may be designated 
at a previous meeting, and on the third Wednesday in May of each year, at which- 
time the business of the Association will be transacted. (See Article 4 of the Con- 
stitution.) 

Art. 3. The object of the Association shall be to unite the reputable pharmacists 
and druggists of the State, to improve the science and art of pharmacy, to elevate its 
standard, and to eventually restrict the practice of pharmacy to properly qualified' 
pharmacists and druggists. 

SYLVESTER S. WEST, [seal.] 

LEWIS C. HOPP, [seal.] 

GEORGE H. FENNER, [skal.] 

NATHAN ROSENWASSER, [seal.] 

ALFRED MAYELL, [seal.] 

WILLIAM F. SPIETH. [seal.] 

STATE OF OHIO, 
Cuyahoga County, 

Belore me, a Notary Public, duly commissioned and sworn, within and for the 
County of Cuyahoga, and State of Ohio, personally appeared the above named Syl- 
vester S. West, Lewis C. Hopp, George H. Fenner, Nathan Rosenwasser, A. Mayell 
and William F. Spieth, corporators of The Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association, 
and acknowledged that they did sign and seal the above certificate, and that the 
same is their free act and deed. 

In Witness Whereof^ I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my Notarial Seal, 
at Cleveland, Ohio, this 26th day of April, A.D., 1880. 

[l. s.] L. a. WILLSON, Notary Public. 

STATEOFOHIO, \ 
Cuyahoga County, / 

I, Wilbur F. Hinman, Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, a Court of Record 
of Cuyahoga County, aforesaid, do hereby certify that L. A. Wilson, before whom 
the annexed acknowledgement was taken, was, at the date theseof, a Notary Public 
in and for said County, duly authorized by the laws of Ohio to take the same, and 
that I am well acquainted with the handwriting, and believe his signature thereto is 
genuine. 

In Testimony Whereof^ I hereunto subscribe my name and affix the seal of said 
Court, at Cleveland, this 28th day of April, A.D., 1880. 

[l. s.] WILBUR F. HINMAN. Clerk. 



j-ss. 



1 24 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTIC AL ASSOCIATION. 



CONSTITUTION. 



ARTICLE I. 
This Association shall be called **The Ohio State Pharmaceutical Asso- 



ciation." 



ARTICLE IL 



The object of this Association shall be to unite the reputable pharmacists and 
druggists of this State, to improve the science and art of pharmacy, to elevate its 
standard, and to restrict the practice of pharmacy to properly qualified pharmacists 
and druggists. 

ARTICLE III. 

Every pharmacist and druggist of good moral and professional standing, and of 
legal age, whether in business on his or her account, retired from business, or em- 
ployed by another, and teachers of pharmacy, materia medica, chemistry and botany, 
who may be especially interested in pharmacy, shall be eligible to membership. 

ARTICLE IV. 

This Association shall meet annually at such time and place as shall be previously 
determined. 

ARTICLE V. 

The officers of this Association shall be a president, two vice presidents, a perma- 
nent secretary, assistant secretary, a permanent treasurer, and an executive committee 
of three, all of whom, except the permanent secretary and treasurer, shall be elected 
annually by ballot, and serve until their successors are duly elected. 

ARTICLE VI. 

Every proposition to alter or amend this Constitution shall be in writing, and 
shall be acted upon at the next annual meeting; when, upon receiving the vote of 
three-fourths of the members present, it shall become a part of the Constitution. 



OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 2 5 



BY-LAWS 



CHAPTER I. 

DUTIES OF OFFICERS. 

Article i. The president shall preside at all meetings of the Association. In 
his absence or inability to preside, one of the vice presidents, or in the absence of all, 
a president ^0 tempore shall perform the duties of the president. In all ballotings, 
and upon all questions upon which the ayes and nayes are taken, the president is 
required to vote; in other cases he shall not vote unless the members be equally 
divided. He shall call a special meeting, whenever requested by twenty-five 
members, and present at each annual ' meeting a report of the operations of the 
Association. 

Article 2. The secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings of the Associ- 
ation, a list of the names, residences, and date of entrance of each member, and be 
the custodian of all papers read; he shall conduct all correspondence of the Associ- 
ation, and notify each member of the meetings. He shall also publish and distribute 
the annual proceedings of the Association, having previously obtained the consent o 
the executive committee to the necessary expenditure of money. 

Article 3. The treasurer shall have charge of all the funds of the Association, 
for which he shall be personally responsible; collect all moneys due the Association; 
pay all bills when countersigned by the president; issue certificates of memberslip; 
render a full report of each annual meeting, and report the state of the treasury 
when called upon by the executive committee. 

Article 4. The executive committee shall take into consideration, and report 
without delay, on all matters of business, and on all propositions for membership, 
and audit all bills against the Association. 

CHAPTER II. 

membership. 

f 

Article i. Propositions for membership shall be made to the executive com- 
mittee, in writing, with the indorsement of two members of the Association in good 
standing; and the vote of two-thirds of the members present at any session shall be 
required for election. 

Article 2. No person shall be considered a member of this Association until he 
has signed the Constitution and By-Laws, and paid an initiation fee of two dollars 

■ • 

and the annual contribution for the current year. 

Artcle 3. Every member^^jshall pay in advance to the treasurer one dollar as his 
yearly contribution, and shall forfeit his membership by neglecting to pay saii con- 
tribution for three successive years. 



1 26 OHIO STA TE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Article 4. Resignations of membetshi)) shall be made in writing to the secretary; 
but no resignations shall be accepted from any one who is in arrears to the treasury, 
nor until he has surrendered his certificate of membership. 

Article 5. The Association shall have power to expel a member by a two-third 
vote; but the vote shall not be taken until the next annual meeting after the charj^es 
have been preferred, and the accused shall be notified of the charges and specifica- 
tions made against him. 

Article 6. Pharmacists, cbemists» and other scientific men who may be thought 
worthy of the distinction, may be elected honoimiy members. They shall not, how- 
ever, be required to contribute to the funds, nor shall they be eligible to hold oftce 
or vote at the meetings. 

Article 7. Pharmaciats, chemisti, and other sciwatific men who. a«e, or have 
been, active members of this Amciatioii, and have lemoved liom the State of Ohio, 
may be elected to associated mtmbenhip. They shall not be 'required to contribate 
to the funds of the Association, nor shall they be eligible to hold office or vote at 
the meetings. 

Aeticlk 8. Active members of thb Aasociatum in good standing for nt leaet five 
ywacs, maf have iasued to them by^he secretary a certificate of life membership, 
'«p0o the pagmient of ten dollars into the treasury of the Association, 

CHAPTER III. 

MEETINGS. 

Article i. Fifteen members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of 
'business. 

Article 2. The order of business shall be as follows: 

1. Calling roll. 5. Election of officers. 

2. Reading minutes. 6. Reading communications. 

3. Election of members. 7. 'Reports of committees. 

4. Report of officers. 8. Miscellaneous business. 

CHAPTER IV. 

RULES OF ORDER. 

Article i. The ordinary rules of parliamentary bodies shall be enforced by the 
presiding officer; from whose decision, however, appeals may be taken, if required 
hf two members, and the meeting shall thereupon decide without debate. 

Article 2. When a question is regularly before the meeting, and is under dis- 
cussion, no motion shall be received but to adjourn, to lay on the table, for the 
(previous question, to postpone to a certain day, to commit or amend, to postpone 
indefinitely — which several motions have precedence ^in the order in which they a^e 
4uvasged. A motion to^adjourn shall be decided without debate. 

Artbcle 3. No imember shall speak twiceon'the8amesubject,«3ceept by per- 
mission, until every member wishing to speak has upoken. 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 1 2 7 

Article 4. On^the call of any two members,the yeas and nays shall be ordered, 
when every member shall vote, unless excused by a majority of those present, and 
the names and manner of voting shall be entered on the minutes. 

CHAPTER V. 

COMMITTSES. 

Article i. The president shall appoint the following committees, viz. : 
A committee of three members on matters of trade interests. 
A committee of three members on papers and queries. 
A committee of five membets on pharmacy laws. 
A committee of five membbrs upon wttiooal formulae. 

A committee of one member for each county on Slftt««tid county corresponrlence. 
A committee of three members on aduiteration'and soplilstittiXion. 

Article 2. Five delegates and five alternates shall be annually elected to attend 
the meetings of the American Pharmaceutical Association. 

Article 3. The president shall, at the first session of the regular meetings, 
appoint a committee of nine to nominate officers for the Association, who shall report 
at the next session. 

CHAPTER VI. 

miscellaneous. 

Article i. Every proposition to alter or annend these By-laws shall be sub- 
mitted in writing, and may be balloted for at any subsequent session; when, upon 
Tecetving a vote of two-thiids of the members present, it shall become a part of the 
By*LfSWs« 

Article 2. ^o one, or more, of these By-Laws shall be suspended. 



128 OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



OHIO PHARMACY LAW. 



[Senate £i!l No. 6.] 
AN ACT 

To amend Sections 4405, 4406, 4407, 4408, 4409, 4410, 441 x, and 44x2 
of the Revised Statutes of Ohio. 

Section i. Be it encuted by the GenercU Assembly of the State of Ohio^ 
That sections forty-four hundred and five, forty-four hundred and six, forty- 
four hundred and seven, forty-four hundred and eight, forty-four hundred and 
nine, forty-four hundred and ten, forty-four hundred and eleven, [and] forty- 
four hundred and twelve of the revised statutes of Ohio, be so amended as to 
read as follows: 

Who must em- SECTION 4405. It shall be unlawful for any person not a registered 

ed^har^cbt.' pharmacist to open or conduct any pharmacy or any retail drug or chemical 
store as proprietor thereof, unless he shall have in hts employ and place in 
charge of such pharmacy, or stoi'e, a registered pharmacist within the mean- 
ing of this chapter, who shall have the supervison and management of that 
part of the business requiring pharmaceutical skill and knowledge; or to en- 
gage in the occupation of compounding or dispensing medicines on perscrip- 
i^uul dniffs. ^^^^^ ^^ physicians, or of sealing at retail for medicinal purposes, ciny drugs, 
chemicals, poisons, or pharmaceutical preparations within this State until he 
has complied with the provisions of thift chapter; provided, nothing in this 
Provisa ^^^^^^^ ^9^ ^Pp'y ^^i O' ^"^ A°y manner interfere with, the business of any 
physician, or prevent him supplying to his patients such articl^ as may seem 
to him proper, or to the making or vending of patent or proprietary medicines 
by any retail dealer, or with the selling by any country store of copperas, 
borax, blue vitriol, saltpetre, sulphur, brimstone, licorice, sage, juniper ber- 
ries, senna leaves, castor oil, sweet oil, spirit of turpentine, glycerine, 
Glauber salt, epsom salt, cream of tartar, bi-carbonate ot sodium; and of 
paregoric, essence of peppermint, essence of cinnamon, essence of ginger, 
hive syrup, syrup of ipecac, tincture of arnica, syrup of tolu, syrup of squills, 
spirit of camphor, number six, sweet spirit of nitre, compound cathartic pills, 
quinine pills, and other similar preparations when compounded by a regular 
pharmacists, and put up in bottles and boxes bearing the label of such phar- 
macists or wholesale druggist, with the name of the article and directions for 
its use on each bottle or box, or with the exclusively wholesale business of any 
dealer. 

Appointment of SECTION 4406. The Ohio State Pharmaceutical Asssociation shall, 

the Ohio Board - 

of Pharmacy, immeadiately upon the pa<«sage of this act, submit to the governor the names 

of ten persons re-idcn's of this State, who have had at least ten years' exper- 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 2 9 

ience as pharmacists and druggists, and from the names so submitted to him 
or others the governor shall, with the approval of the Senate, select and 
appoint five persons, who shall constitute a board, to be styled the Ohio 
Board of Pharmacy; one member of said board shall be appointed, and hold 
his office for one year; one for two years, one for three years, one for four 
years, and one for five years, and until his successor shall be appointed and 
qualified; and at its regular annual meeting in each and every meeting there- 
after, the said Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association shall select and submit 
to the governor the names of five persons, with the qualification hereinbefore 
mentioned, and the governor shall, with the approval of the Senate, select 
and appoint from the names so submitted, or others, one member of said 
board, who shall hold his office for five years, until his successor shall be ap- ^*^3' jj* **** 
pointed and qualified. Any vacancy that may occur in said board shall be fiUed. ' 
filled for the unexpired term by the governor, with the approval of the Senate. 
Each member of said board shall, within ten days after his appointment, take 
and subscribe an qath of affirmation, before a compentent officer, to faithfully 
and impartially perform the duties of his office. 

, Section 4407. Th0 Ohio Board of P.harmacy shall hold three regular g^ggjo^j ^f ^j,^ 
meetings Jiv each .year; one at Cincinnati on the second Monday of Jaruary, Board, when 
one.^t Columbus on the second Monday of May, and one at Cleveland on the h«ldT 
second Monday of October, and^ such additional meetings,. at such times and 
places as may be determined upon by said. board, ac each of which meetings it 
sh^ transact sucU. business, as is required of it by, law;. said board shall make £>„({,;, ^f Board. 
suqIi rules, byrl^ws and regulations as may be necessary, for the proper dis- 
charge -of their duties, and shall make a report of its proceedings, . including 
an Itemized account of all moneys, received and expended by said board, ^^^ _p . 
pursnant to this chapter, and a, list of all pharmacists duly registered under ■ tration to be 
this act, to t^ secretary of state-on the 15th day of November, 18S4, and ^ 
s^nnu^ly therepifter, and> to the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association. , Said 
board shall keep a book of registration open at some place in Columbus, of 
which due notice shall be given in three or more newspapers of general circu- 
lation, in this State, in which th^ name and. place of business of every 1 erson 
duly qitrlified under this chapter to conduct, or engage in the business men- 
tioned and described in sectioja-fortyt-four hundred and five, shall be registered. 
Every person now conducting or engaged in such buslne>s in this State as propri- 
etor or manager of the saixie,.or who, beingof the ageof eighteen yeaxs, has been' 
employed. 00 engaged for three years ^pifeceeding the passage of this act as an 
assistant in any. retail drug store in the United- Slates, .in the cpmpounding 
or dispensing of ^ medicines on the.perscriptions of physicians^ who shall fur- 
nish satisfasct^ry evidence in i^ritiogaiid under, oath, of such facts, within three 
months after the publication of sa»d notice,, shall be re^i^ered as a pharmac^tt 
or- assistant pharmacist, us the case may be,, without examination. Eve^j: per- p^^ f^^ registra- 
son who 9hall desire hereafter to conduct, or ispgage ip such b.\isipess in ti)is tion. 
Stat€>,«ftall appear before, si^id board, ^and be ieg4stered,,within teii,4/»ys ajfjter 



IJO OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

recdving a certificate of competency and qualificBtiaii from said board. The 
said board shall demand and receive for such registration from each and efeiy 
person registered as a pharmacist, a fee of not exceeding thr^ dollars, and 
from each and every person registered as an assistant pharmacist, a fee not 
exceeding two dollars, to be applied to the payment of the expenses arising 
under the provisions of this chapter. Provided, however, that no such fee 
shall be demanded of any person who has heretofore been registered as the pio- 

Fee for renewal pnetor or manager of such business or as an assistant therein, under the pro- 
of legUtratioii. visions of any Uw heretofore in force in this State. Every registered phtr- 
macist, or assistant pharmacist, who desires to continue the practice of his 
profession, shall,triednially thereafter, during the time heih^l cotitinne in snch 
practice, on such date as said board may determine, pay to the secrt^tny of 
said board a registration 'fee, to be fixed hj said board, bat whlUi shall in no 
case exceed, if a pharmacist, one dollar; if assistant pharmacist, fifty cents, 
for which he shall receive a renewel of said registration. Eveky centficate of 
registration granted under this act shall be constsiconsily tfKposed'in the pre. 
scription department of the drug ot chemical store to which *it tfptilies, or in 
which the assistant is engaged. The seonWry of said boatd ^illl l«ori»e a 

Sakry ofSeere- salary which shall be fixnd by said board; he shall also roeilve h& toaveU* 
^*^ ^' ing and other expMMs itiennned in the pcihtnmKit «f his 4tBUmi duties. 

The other metnbersof ftaid board shall re^ve the sum of 'tfnor dsflarslDT 
eneh dsty actuallyenKaged in l3ie service fhtfnof; Md alL laf^liuamr and lAc- 
esHury expen^eaiMaMiad in atlitoding the 'ttmetings of said bdnsb find sabry 
pftr diam, and expenaet shall bepaidaffinr an itemised st«tfllMktr«f ^IhesiBie 
baa been lendfend attd approved by iht h^mA^ from tHa flMa-ind penakks 

EMstKoffeM, received by said homd i»d«r the pio^ isi ent <tf this acfc ML mmm.^ iiiaBiffcd 

hewdipoMdof. in excesb Of said par diem^ aVowanoe, and othet*f pinaai^aliSiW ^iiihlhflfaie, 

shall be-heid by the scoetny as & special fmid isa wmt^ig lift 'ai|atM»of 

Stud board; he givii^ aoeh bond as said boMd ^hall Ami tioMmtlMcdlMtt 



Duties of Board SECTION 440B. TfaeOfaio BoMd •! VhuomMf sfaall cxanioa eiR«y per* 
to Ma^^ ^^ ^^^ desires to casiy on or engage in the business of. a ntail itpothoBaiy, 
doas. or of retailing any drugs, medicines^ dMmiealt» peiaons, or phasmanna ticai 

preparations, or of compounding or dispensing the presciiptms of physi- 
cians, as propriet<.;r and manager, touching his competency- and qnetification 
for that purpose, and upon a. majority, of the board being satisfied of such 
competency and qualification, they shall-fumish'such person a oerdficate of 
his competency and qualification, as phannaeiat, which certificate rshall en- 
title the person named theiein to conduct and. carsy on the habeas afionmid, 
as proprietor and manager thereof, upon eomtpiying with tSie aoqeiienMnts of 
section forty-four hundred and seven; and such boaid shall ^also examine each 
iperson^ho desires to engage in such business as tasistaint phermadal^ toach- 
ing bis competency and qualificaiion, and upon such pesaon fMisiog H srtlbfac- 
tory examination, setting forth that he is a xiuaKfied assistant in pliiMHnacf, 



OHIO STATE FBABMACEVTHyAL ASSOCIATIOK. 13I 

which certificate shall enable the person named therein to engage in said 
business as an assistant pharmacist, upon hb complying with the provisions of 
section forty-four hundred and seren. 

Section 4409. The provisions of [section] forty-four hundred and To whom pre- 
eight shall not apply to any person engaged in the retail drug and apothecary sions do not 
business, as proprietor or maiiager of the same, at the time of the passage of ^pp^v- 
this act, or who, being at the age of eighteen years, has been continuously 
employed or engaged for three years immediately preceeding the passage of 
this* act, as assistant in any retail drag store tn the United States, in the com- 
pounding or dispensing of medicines on the prescriptions of physicians, who 
has complied with the provisions ot section forty«four hundred and seven. 

Sbction^io (as amtnded Maidi aoih, 1884.) 'No poson not a qual- Asusunt Phar- 
fied assistant, ilnli be allowed by tfa« proprietor w nauMger <f any retail ^aiified. 
drug or ctoBiMl «toce, to ^compottad or ditpeiise the p^rtifipttcms of 
physicians, esetpt M ab aid «ider the sapenrison of a'rsi^stimd phavmiMist« 
or his qittlSfied cftlstiflit. 

SscTioN 441 1 (as amended marcli 29th, 1884). A qualified assistant, QuaUficadoos of 
within the meaning of this chaptac, shall be a clerk or assistant in a retail JJJJ^^ ^ 
drug or chemical store, who shall furnish to the Ohio Botrd of Pharmacy 
such evidence of his«ittpl^meift tts 2s required by seirtion ^forty-four hundred 
and seven; or a 'person holdirg the certificate of said board, as an assistant 
pharmacist, as provided in section forty-four hundred and eight; but it 
shall be unlawful for such assistant pharmacist, or qualified assistant, 
to supervise or manage any pharmacy or retail drug or chemical store, or to 
engage in the occupation of compounding 01 dispensing medici^nes on pse- 
scriptines of physicians, or of selling at retail for medicinal purposes, any 
drugs, chemicals, poisons, or pharmaceutical preparations, except when en- 
gaged or employed in a pharmacy, retail drug or chemical store, which is in 
charge of and is under the super vison and management of a registered 
pharmacist. 

SBCTIOK4412 (as amended March aoth, 1884). Any person owning a Penalties for vio- 
pharmacy, retail drug or chemical store, who, in violation of the provisions of ****"* accuon 
section 4405 of this act, causes or permits the same to be conducted or man- 
aged by a person not a registered pharmacist, shall be deemed guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof, shall be fined in any sum >not 
less than twenty dollars, nor more than one hundred dollars, and «ach week 
that he shall cause or permit such pharmacy, retail drug or chemioal store to 
be so conducted or managed shall constitute a sepftmte and distinot oiFence» 
and render him liable to separate prosecution and pumshment therefor; a per- ^ ut^a!rse€tion^ 
son violating the provisions of section fcnrty-fotir hundred and sevtfli, rriatlng to 4407- 
registi«tion,^Btttewal of regiitmtion, or failing to oonspionousiy eicpose such 
certificate of re^stration, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, Sitid Upon 



132 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 

convi tion thereof shall be fined in any tarn not exceeding one hundred dol- 
Penalties for vio- Utrs for each week he continues to carry on or to be engaged in such business 
4410. without such registration or such exposure of such certificate of registration, 

or renewal thereof. And for the violation of any of the provisions of section 
4410, such proprietor or manager shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor. 
Penalties for vio- And upon conviction thereof shall be fined in any sum not exceeding fifty 
lating leetion dollars for each and every offense; and for the violation of any of the provis- 
ions of 441 1, such assistant pharmacist shall be deemed guilty of amisdemeaor, 
and upon conviction thereof shall be fined in any sum not exceeding fifty dollars 
for each and every offense. All fines assessed for the violation of any of the 
provisions of this act shall be placed in the county treasury, for the use and 
benefit of the common school fund of the county in which such offense is 
committed; provided that nothing in this act shall be construed as, to in any 
Duty of the way affect the right of any person to bring a civil action against any person 
ma^^umm^pl '®^*"*^ ^o *» ^^^^ ^^t, for any act or acts for which a civil action may now be 
plication to brought. It shall be the duty of the Ohio Board of Pharmacy, upon ap- 
cause proMcu- pH^j^^j^Q therefor being made to said board, to cause the prosecution of any 
person ^r persons violatii^ any of the provisions of this act« 



ADULTERATION LAW. 



[Hous- Bill No. 18.] 

AN ACT 

To provide against the adulteration of food and drugs. 
Section i. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio ^ 
That no person shall, within this State manufacture for sale, ofter for sale, or 
sell any drug or article of food which is adulterated, within the meaning of 
this act. 
Term drug de- Sec. 2. The term '*drug" as used in this act, shall include all medicines 
for internal or external use, antiseptics, disinfectants and cosmetics. The tei m 
''food" as used herein, shall include all articles used for food or drink by man, 
whether simple, mixed or compound. 

Sec- 3.' An article shall be deemed to be adulterated within the meaning 

of this act: 

When drugs are (a) In the case of drugs: (i) If, when sold under or by a nanie recognized 

te^™ d. " ' ^^ ^^^ United States Pharmacopoeia, it differs from the standard of strength* 

quality or purity laid down therein; (2) If, when sold under or by a name not 

recognized in the United States Pharmacopoeia but which is found in some 

other ftharmacopoeia, or other standard- work on materia medica, it differs 

materially from the standard of strength, quajAty 'or purity laid down in such 

Vork; (3) If its strength, quality or purity falls below the professed standard 

under which it is sold. 



OHTO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 33 

•J, 

(b) In the case of food: (i) If any substance or substances have been When food deem- 
in ixed with it, so as to lower or depreciate, or injuriously affect its quality, 
strength or purity; (2) If any inferior or cheaper substance or substances have 
been substituted wholly or in part for it; (3) If any valuable or necessary con- 
stituent or iugredient has been wholly or in part abstracted from it; (4) If it is 
an imitation of, oris sold under the name of another article; (5) If it consists 
wholly or in part, of a diseased, decomposed, putrid, infected, tainted or 
rotten animal or vegetable substance or article, whether manufactured or not 
— or, in case of milk, if it is the produce of a diseased animal; (6) If it is 
colored, coated, polished or powdered, whereby damage or inferiority is con- 
cealed, or if by any means it is made to appear better or of greater value than 
it really is; (7) If it contains any added substance or ingredient which is 
poisonous or injurious to health, or any deleterious substance not a necessary 
ingredient in its manufacture; provided that the provisions of this act shall 
not apply to mixtures or compounds recognized as ordinary articles of food, if 
the same be distinctly labeled as mixtures or compounds, and are not injurious 
to health, and contain no ingredient not necessary to the preparation of a 
genuine article of such mixtureis or compounds, and from which no necessary 
ingredient in its preparation is eliminated. 

Sec. 4. ^ Every person manufagtuung, offering or exposing for sale or deliv- Sample may be 
ering to a purchaser, any drug or article of food included in the provisions of< analysis, 
this act, shfdl furnish to any persop interested or demanding the same, who 
shall apply to him for the purpose, and shall tender him the value of the same, 
a sample st^fficient for the analysis of any such drug or article of food which is 
in his possessioq. 

Sec. 5. Whoever refuses to comply, upon demand, with the requirements penalties, 
of section four, and whoever violates any of the provisions of this act, shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be fined not exceeding 
one hundred nor less than twenty-five dollars, or imprisoned not exceeding one 
hundred nor less than thirty days, or both. And any person found guilty of 
manufacturing, offering for sale or selling an adulterated article of food or drug 
under the provisions of this act, ^hall be adjudged to pay, in addition to the 
penalties hereinbefore provided for, all necessary costs and expenses incurred 
in inspecting and analyzing such adulterated artides^df which said person may 
have been found guilty of manufacturing, selling or offering for sale. 

Sec. 6. This act shall take effect and be in force in forty days from and 
after its passage. 

A. D. MARSH, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives, 
ELMER WHITE, 
President pro tern, of the Senate. 
Passed March 20, 1884. 



134 OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATIOJt. 



POISON LAW. 



Sec. 6957 Revised Sututes of Ohio. 
Whoever sells, or gives away, any quantity of arsenic less than one pounds- 
without first mixing therewith soot or in4igo in the proportion of one ounce oi 
soot or half an ounce of indigo to the pound of arsenic, or, except upon the 
prescription of a physician, sells or gives away, any quantity of any article 
belonging to the class usually denomkiated poisons, to any minor, or sells, or 
gives away, any such article to any person, without hav4ng first marked the 
word "poison" upon the label or wtmpper containing the same, and registered 
in a book to be by him kept for that purpose, the day and date upon which i^ 
is sold or given away, the quantity thereof, the name, age, sex, and color o 
person obtaining the same» the purpose for which it is required, and the name 
and place of abode of the person for whom the same is intended, shall be 
fined not mpre than two hundred nor less than twenty dollars. [50 V. 167, §§. 
I, 2, 3, 4] 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 135 



MORPINE LAW. 



[House Bill No. 66.] 

To prescribe the manner of selling the sulphate and other preparations of 

nunrphine in the State and for other purposes. 

Section i. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio^ 
That it shall not be lawful for any person, other than a wholesale druggist or 
other dealer in drugs and medicine, to sell or offer for sale at wholesale, or for 
any person other than a registered phannacist or a registered assistant phar- 
macist, to sell or offer for sale at retail, morphine or any of its salts, in this 
State, and it shall not be lawful for such persons to sell or ofier for sale mor. 
phine or any of its salts in any bottle, vial, envelope or other package, unless 
the same shall be wrapped in a scarlet paper or envelope, and all bottles or 
vials used for the above purpose shall contain not mote than one drachm each, 
and shall have in addition to said scarlet wrapper a scarlet label lettered in 
white letters, and the same must b« upon both vial and wrapper when vials 
are used, plainly naming the contents of said bottle; and further, that no 
person shall have the light to change any preparation of morphine from its 
original package to any other receptacle whatever for the purpose of retailing 
or fiispensing therefrom, but it must be retailed or dispensed only from the 
original package with scarlet wrapper and scarlet label as aforesaid. 

Section 2. That any one violating the provisions of the above section 
shall, be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be fined not 
less than ten nor more than fifty dollars, at the discretion of the court, foe each 
and every violation of the preceding section. 

Section 3. That all laws and parts of laws in conflict with this act be 
and the same are hereby repealed. 

Section 4t This act shall take effect and be in force from and after 

September i, 1886. 

JOHN C. ENTREKIN, 

Speaker of the House of Representatives, 

JNO. O'NEILL, 

President pro tern of the Senate. 
Passed April 8, 1886. 



130 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



LIST OF MEMBERS 

IN ATTEND A NCB AT THE 

Ninth Annual Meeting, June 8th, 9th and loth, 1887, 



Acker, P Cleveland 

Albro, W. H Medina 

Alexander, W, W. Akron 

Allen, S. E Akron 

Baird, R East Springfield 

Beck, J. I Springfield 

Bellermann, J. H Lancaster 

Benedict, D. D., M.D: Norwalk 

Berg, F Upper Sandusky 

Bevard, H Canal Fulton 

Biddle, H. G Cleveland 

Byrider, John Akron 

Blankenhom, H. Orrville 

Bort, t.O '. Logan 

Boyer, H, Washington C. H 

Bubna, J. V .' . Cleveland 

Cassaday, A. S Alliance 

Coblentz, F. H . Springfield 

Coblentz, V Springfield 

Cook, H. C Columbus 

Comet, G. A Port Washington 

Crane, R. W Greensburg 

Culler, F. W. CleveUnd 

Davis, C. W ; JefFersonville 

Davis, W. P Akron 

Doran, I. A Rushsylvania 

Eady, H.J Elyria 

Emrich, J. H Sandusky 

Feil, J Cleveland 

Fennel, C. T. P Cincinnati 

Fenton, C. F Cleveland 

Flandermeyer, H. H Cleveland 

Flandermeyer, H. D Cleveland 

Frederick, J. F Toledo 

Fulton, M. D Bucyrus 

Griffiths, H Cincinnati 

Grossklaus, J. F Navarre 

Hackedom, M. L Galion 

Hale, W. F., M.D Jackson C. H 



Hall, C. F Youngstown 

Hart, D. P Akron 

Hechler, G. L Cleveland 

Hill, C. E... Richwood 

Himmelman, G. C Akron 

Hitchman, A. A '. . . . Butler 

Honecker, A. B Cleveland 

Honecker, J. J Cleveland 

Hopp, L. C. .' . Clevel an 

Horst, J. H ! . . . Clevelan 

Huston, C. ;..... Columbus 

Inman, C. T. ' Akrcn 

inman, S. C . . .* . . Akron 

Jewett, W. A ;....... .Lorain 

Johnson, T. Steubenville 

kautz, F. A Cincinnau 

Keiper, L.' . ! Cleveland 

Kieffer, G. . . . . . ........ . . . .Cleveland 

Kneeland, C. A Conneaut 

Koons, C. W... Cleveland 

Krauter, C. H . .! ; . . . .Youngstown 

Kuhlmeier, H. .Cleveland 

Lane, E. B Cleveland 

Lehr.PhU Cleveland 

Lewis, A. C Bucyrus 

Lewis, A. L Hamden Junction 

Lewis, B. G Girard 

Lloyd, J. U Cincinnati 

Lynn, G. A Akron 

McClain, M. H Galion 

McDowell, O. H Medina 

McFarland, T. D ! Canton 

McKeown, S. W Youngstown 

Martin, W. J Cincinnati 

Meyer, W. V Cleveland 

Miller, CM Mansfield 

Morganthaler, P Massillon 

Murray, S. W Washington C.H 

Neff, B New Carlisle 



OHIO STATE PHABMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



137 



Newcomb, N. O Cleveland 

Nye, C. N Canton 

Openheimer, J. H Canton 

Petersilge, A Cleveland 

Pfeiffer, J Akron 

Pfiffner, F. J. R. Delaware 

Prohaska, O. F ... Akron 

Rendigs, C. P Cincinnati 

Rosewater, N Cleveland 

Schambs, G. M Cleveland 

Schilling,' J. P Loaisville 

Schroeder, G. A Cleveland 

Shafer, CM Canal Fulton 

Silberling, J. H Cleveland 

Smith, L. W .Byesville 

SoUmann, L Canton 

Spenzer, P. I., M.D Cleveland 



Springsteen, W. S Cleveland 

Stecher, H. W Cleveland 

Stierle, J. G Versailles 

Sturgis, T. A Dalton 

Sullivan, £. N ^ Urbana 

Taggart, P. S New Lexington 

Thompson, R. A Kent 

Thompson, R. D Akron 

Voss, G. W Cincinnati 

Wahmhoff, J. H Delphos 

Warner, A ^ Akron 

Weber, C. L Canton 

Wertz, W. H. H Dalton 

West, S. S Cleveland 

Weyer, John •. . ..Cincinnati 

Whitteker, B Cincinnati 

Woods, F. M Warren 



'38 



OHIO STATE PHAB31ACK0TICAL ASSOCIATION. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



*N«w Members. 



Abbey, J Dayton 

Abbey, W. J Dayton 

Acker, P Cleveland 

Ackermann, J. C Columbus 

Adams, A. A Waverly 

Adderley, W. H Cincinnati 

Aigin, S. C Delaware 

Albro, W. H Medina 

Alexander, £. V McConnellsville 

Alexander, W. W. Akron 

Allen, E. H . .MarelU 

Allen, S. £ Akron 

*Altenberger, P. J ... . Upper Sandusky 

Amann, C Sidney 

Amann, C. E., Sr Portsmouth 

Amann, C. £., Jr Portsmouth 

Amann, F Portsmouth 

Amann, F. O Sidney 

Anderson, W. P Marysville 

Arnold, D. R Sandusky 

Ashbrook, C. S Ada 

Atchison, J. R London 

Averbeck, M. J Youngstown 

Ayers, J. M., M.D Cincinnati 

Ayers, M. A Cincinnati 

Bach, W. J East Toledo 

Bain, A. W Cincinnati 

Bain, F. W .... Cincinnati 

Baird, R East Springfield 

Baker, G. R Mt. Vernon 

Baker, P. A Mt. Vernon 

Bakhaus, A Springfield 

Baldwin, F. M .Blanchester 

Ballenger, C. S Akron 

Baltzley, Z. T Massillon 



Barrere, G. W Lima 

Ban, S. E Canton 

Barringer, D., M.D Rocky Ridge 

Bartlett, W Toledo 

Batterson, Mrs. E. F Belleville 

Bauer, F. A Columbus 

Baumgartner, F Chillicothe 

*Baumhart, C. C Vermillion 

Baush, K. M Zanesville 

B«\yer, E. W Cindnnat 

Beall, A Williamsburg 

Beall, W. M Steubenville 

*Bcam, J. H Powhatan Point 

Beany, W. W StcubenviUe 

Beaid, J. M Spencerville 

Beardsley, W. P Bainbridge 

Beck, J. I Springfield 

Beck, J. W Lancaster 

Belford, Dr. E. A Nevada 

Bellermann, J. H Lancaste 

Benedict, D. D., M.D Norwalk 

♦Benfield, C. W Cleveland 

Benner, C. C Columbus 

Bentley, E. S ■ Hudson 

Berg, F Upper Sandusky 

Berger, J. W Columbus 

Betz, O. E Cincinnati 

Bevan, J Mendon 

Bevard, H ... Canal Fulton 

Biehl, L. A Sandusky 

Biddle, H. G Cleveland 

Bigler, O Cincinnati 

Black, C. T Ripley 

Black, W. R .Findlay 

Blankenhorn, H Orrville 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUnCAL ASSOCIATION. 



139 



♦Blas^r, J. T Waverly 

Blehr, J. C New Richmond 

Blocker, H. C Akron 

Blum, F. }. Canton 

Bock, A. W Cleveland 

Bock, F Cleveland 

Bodebender, W Cleveluid 

Boehmer, A. L Cincinnati 

Bohl, C Watertown 

Bohn, J. H Camden 

Bohn,, M. G Miamisburg 

♦Boise, J. C Seville 

Bolger, J. C Salem 

Bonar, R. S New Lexington 

Bonnell, D. W Hubbard 

*Bonner, C. A Dayton 

*Bort, L. O Logan 

Bower, F. T > Toledo 

Boyd, S. H Wooster 

Boyer, H Washington C. H 

Bracelin, H Bluflfton 

Bradley, Q West Jefferson 

Braun, H Columbus 

Brant, E.D Hayesville 

Brenner, C. £ Lima 

Brinker, J. H Bellevue 

Brown, F. A New Lisbon 

Brown, T. F Washington C. H 

Brown, W. C Columbus 

Brown, W. G Wilmington 

Brodbeck, W. T. Columbus 

Bruce, J Cleveland 

Bruck, P. H Columbus 

Bryant, C. W Granville 

*Bubna, J. V Cleveland 

Buchanan, C. R Harmon 

Buckwell, A. J Toledo 

Bukey, J. S Marietta 

Burgitt, J. L Dayton 

Burger, A.-. Toledo 

♦Burgess, M. S Caldwell 

Burgoyne, W. R Steubenville 

Burkhardt, M. A Dayton 

Burton, G. F Sprinfield 



Busch, A Woodville 

Busch, £., M.D Woodville 

Busch, H. C, M. D Cleveland 

*Byrider, J Akron 

Byrne, J Columbus 

Cadwell, S. D Akron 

Campbell, W. J LaRue 

Carey, M. J., M.D WoodvUle 

Carlisle, F.L Newton Falls 

Carnahan, J Steubenville 

Camahan, W. G Steubenville 

Carnell, H. D Dayton 

Carotbers, W , Carey 

Carpenter, J. H Cleveland 

Carpenter, S. W Delhi 

Carter, G.H Delaware 

Case, F. S Logan 

Case, F. S BellefonUine 

Case, J. H Akron 

Case, L Cleveland 

Casper, T. J., M.D Springfield 

Cassaday, A. S Alliance 

Chadwick, W. M Findlay 

Champney, A. R Perrysburg 

Champney, W. R Perrysburg 

Chappelear, F. B Zanesville 

Chapman, C. F 

Charles, X. F Republic 

Cheney,F. J Toledo 

Clark, C. A : Mt. Sterling 

Clark, S. L Wharton 

*Claus, G. T Cleveland 

Clayton, £. P Somerset 

Cleaveland, C. A Greenfield 

Cobb, L. A Cleveland 

Cobb, R. L Cleveland 

Coblentz, F. H Springfield 

♦Coblentz, G Springfield 

Coblentz, V Springfield 

Cokefair, C. B College Corners 

Colby, W. D Defiance 

Cole, C. W Wharton 

Coleman, J. G Mineral 

CoUett, O. F New Burlington 



I40 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



ColUos, £. A Wauseon 

Collins, F. A Newaik 

Colwell,J. M UibaiiA 

Conkright, A. B Richwood 

Connor, J. O Urbuim 

Cook, F. M Frospect 

Cook, H. C Columbus 

Cook, H. D Eist Toledo 

Cook, J. R Columbus 

Cook, W. S E»st Toledo 

Cornell, C. R Columbus 

•Comet, G. A Port Washirgton 

Cornet, L. A Port Washington 

Cramer, G. W Urbana 

Cramer, S. P Hubbard 

Crane, E. J Iberia 

Crane, R. W Greensburg 

Crites, H Akron 

Crosby, C. M Toledo 

♦Culler, F. W Cleveland 

Cunningham, J. C Shreve 

Cupp, C. V Bellevue 

Currey, J N Georgcto a n 

Curtiss, C. A Wadsworth 

Danforth, E. C Toledo 

Daniels, T Toledo 

Darrah, D. H Bellaire 

Daugherty, J. U Dayton 

Davies, J. E West A'exandria 

♦Davis, C. W Jeffersonville 

Davis, J. M Chillicothe 

Davis, T. C Ironton 

Davis, W. H. C Hillsboro 

Davis, W. P Akron 

*Dean, A. H Wavcrly 

Dean, W. D Kenton 

Deemer, C. H New Lisbon 

DeLang, A Cincinnati 

Denman, W. M West Unity 

Denison, L Marion 

Dent, J. C. Bridgeport 

De Rhodes, F Salem 

Deutler, S. S Republic 

Deutsch, J. W Cleveland 



Dew, J. T Summerfield 

Dick, C Sandusky 

Deitz, J. C DtLjXxm 

Dixon. G. M Dayton 

Dodge, J. M Cincinnati 

Doeller, G Hamilton 

Donnelly, F. H Wooater 

Donnan, E. V Washington C. H 

Doran, I. A Rush sylvania 

Douds, A. H Canton 

Downar, J. R Cambridge 

Doyle, S. W Winchester 

*Diacb, G. L Cleveland 

Dreher, L Cleveland 

Dresky, J. J Cleveland 

Dronberger, L. R Jamestown, N.Y 

Dull, L. E Forest 

Danlap, G. G Unionport 

Dunn, F. H Bainbridge 

Dur&tine, F. H., M.D Cleveland 

Dustin, C. H Cleveland 

Eady, H. J Elyria 

Edwards, E. B Columbus 

Ellhwo th, C. S Brecksville 

Edwards, J. W Bellaire 

Eger, G Cincinnati 

Eicbberg, J. H*. Cincinnati 

*Eisenbour, C. L Massillon 

Elfer^, J. C Cincinnati 

♦Ellis, T. B Washington C. H 

Ely, E. S Bamesville 

Elliott, S. T Cleveland 

Emrich, J. H Sandusky 

Esbelman, L. J Fostoria 

Evans, H. W Delphos 

Evans, J. S Cincinnati 

Evans, J. W Delphos 

Evans, S. B CircleviUe 

Eyman, L. £ Groveport 

Fabing, J Cincinnati 

Fallon, J. M Cincinnati 

*Farquhar, W Bncyrus 

Farrell, H. J Xenia 

Fell, J Cleveland 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



141 



Farley, W. C Bellaire 

Felt, F. D Wellingtott 

Feemster, J. H Cincinnati 

Feemster, W Cincinnati 

Fennel, C. T. P Cincinnati 

Fenner, G. H Cleveland 

Fenner, J. C ShUoh 

♦Fenton, C. F Cleveland 

•Ferguson, J. R Cleveland 

Fickardt, F.L Circlcville 

Fiedler, G. W South Paris 

Field, J. W MarysviUc 

Finfrock, M. V. B Mansfield 

Fisher, A Burbank 

Fischer, E. A Cleveland 

•Fischer, H. J Cleveland 

Fisher, G. H Toledo 

Fisher, J. V Morristown 

Fisler, I Urbana 

Fitzpatrick, S. J Fayetteville 

Flandermeyer. H. D Cleveland 

Flandermeyer, H. H Cleveland 

Fleck, J. J Tiffin 

Fleming, E. C Xenia 

tFlocken, L. H Marion 

Flood, W. H : Cleveland 

Fogle, G. T Alliance 

Foland, D. J Wilmington 

Foley, J. B Steuben ville 

Foncanon, G. U Liberty Center 

Forbes, J. W Cincinnati 

Foraker, J. W Corning 

Forrest, J. T Cleveland 

Fortlage, J. H ..Cleveland 

Foster, A. M Steubenville 

Francis, H. S Uhricksville 

Franke, A Wapakoneta 

Fraser, H. J East Palestine 

Fratz, J. G Cincinnati 

Fiazer, G. M Toledo 

♦Frederick, J. M Akron 

French, L. B Salem 

Friedland, J. F Coalton 

♦Friedrick, J. F Toledo 

tConrespondeiit for Mari6n 



Fromme, A Cincinnati 

Fuelling, D Wapakoneta 

Fulton, M. D Bucyrus 

Gable, D West Salem 

Gackenheimer, D.'F Van Wert 

Gackenheimer, M. W Van Wert 

Gaitree, W. B Marietta 

Gardner, A. J., M.D. . . .Grand Rapids 

♦Gaube, E Cleveland 

Gaylord, H. C Cleveland 

Gf gelein, F. L Cleveland 

Gehrung, J. M. Cleveland 

George, A. H Cleveland 

George, R. H Cleveland 

Gerstacker, M Cleveland 

Gibson, C. J Columbus 

Gilbert, A. W Lima 

Gilbert, H. A Lockland 

Gillard, W. H Oxford 

Gill, D. W West Liberty 

*Gilman, C . S Akron 

Gleick, H. M Cincinnati 

*Gleim, J.C Cleveland 

Glenn, A. H Sardinia 

GUnes, G. W Cleveland 

Godfrey, C. P Dayton 

Godman, C. A Cleveland 

Goebel, C. W Springfield 

Goodbread, J. N Nevada 

Goodman, £ Cincinnati 

Gordon, W. J. M Cincinnati 

Graham, A., Jr *. Ottawa 

Graham, C. V Zanesville 

Graham, W. H Zanesville 

*Grayum, C. W Gallipolis 

Greenamyer, E., M.D... East Palestine 

Grether, J Akron 

Greve, T. L. A Cincinnati 

Greyer, C Cincinnati 

Griffith, H. H , . . . .Cincinnati 

Groenland, R Cincinnati 

Grosse, W. F Cleveland 

Grossklaus, J. F Navarre 

Grossman, F. A Cleves 

Co. in place of £. C. Walu 



142 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 



Grund, H. C Fremont 

Guthrie, J. H Conneaut 

Gysel, R Toledo 

Haag, G. D Cleveland 

Haber, L. A Cleveland 

♦Haefele, G. L., M.D..West Richfield 

Hackedorn, M. L Gallon 

Hale, S. J Avondale 

Hale, W. F., M.D Jackson 

Hall, C. F Youngstown 

Hall, L. B Cleveland 

Hall, W. J Cincinnati 

Hamlin, R. £ East Toledo 

Hank, T. B., M.D Sylvania 

Hare, A : Bettsville 

*Harley, J. P. Lima 

Harmon, M.M Colambus 

*Harper, C. B ^ Leetonia 

Harrington, F Logan 

Harrison, J. M Cincinnati 

Hart, D. P. Akron 

Hart, W. T CleveUnd 

Hartness, W. H Cleveland 

Hatton, £. M Zanesville 

Hauck, T Columbus Grove 

Hauenstein, A BlufTton 

Hauser, J. C Sandusky 

Hauss, J. J St. Marys 

Haven, W. H Findlay 

Hawkins, M. S Salem 

Hawkins, R. L Cincinnati 

Hawley, A. K Jefferson 

Hawthorn, D. M . . Cambridge 

Heath, F. M White House 

Hebner, A Dayton 

Hechler, G. L Cleveland 

Heinemann, O Cincinnati 

Heinemann, A Cincinnati 

Heister, J. P Cincinnati 

*Heister, U. S Springfield 

Heitztnan, A Toledo 

Heller, M. M Cleveland 

Henderson, C. B Athens 

Henkelman, H. K Sandusky 



Herbst, F. W Co 

Herwig, G. A Cincinnati 

Heydrick, L Toledo 

Hickman, W. G Nelsonville 

Hickok, H. M Ashtabula 

♦Hildaboldt, C. W Germantown 

Hildreth, N. G Cheviot 

Hill, C. E Richwood 

Hill, F. P Elyria 

Hilton, L. R llillsboro 

Himmelman, G. C Akron 

•Hines, J. A Van Wert 

Hinds, J. W Marion 

Hitchman, A Butler 

Hoberman. H. C Marion 

Hochstetler, J. C Doylestown 

Hoehn, J Cleveland 

Hoffman, J Cincinnati 

Hoffman, J. L New Bremen 

Hoffman, O. L Columbus 

Hofling, A. J Cincinnati 

Hoge, J. B St. Clairsville 

Holman, H. N Columbus 

HoUenbeck, E. F Cincinnati 

Hollenbeck, M. W Cincinnati 

Hollinger, T Columbus 

♦Holloway, W. G. . . Springfield 

Honecker, A Cleveland 

Honecker, J. J Cleveland 

Hoopes, W. W Minerva 

Hoover, Z. T Dayton 

Hopp, L. C Cleveland 

Hornung, J Dresden 

Horst, J. H Clevelacfd 

Hosach, C Frederickstown 

Hovekamp, J. J Cincinnati 

Howson, A. B Chillicothe 

Howson, W. H Chillicothe 

Hoy, B. F Holmesville 

Hubbard, E. B Tiffin 

Huber, J. M Findlay 

Hudson, W. J South Charleston 

Hull, H. M Cleveland 

Huston, C Xolumbus 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICALtASSOCIATION, 



M3 



Huston, J. C College Corner 

Hatchings, J, H Bellevue 

Hutchison, J. C Cambridge 

*Hutt, P Waverly 

Hyers, W. H Dayton 

Ink, C. £ Columbiana 

Ink, H. H Leetonia 

Inman, C. T Akron 

Inman, S. C Akron 

Ireman, J. W Wharton 

Irwin, J. L Ann Arbor, Mich 

♦Isaacs, B. S Dayton 

Jacobi, A Cincinnati 

Jeffrey, D. G Tiro 

Jeffrey, F. M Tiro 

Jewitt, W. A Lorain 

Johnson, C. B Middleton 

Johnson, C. S New Concord 

Johnson, J. D Massillon 

Johnson, J. M Steubenville 

Johnson, J. R Ztnesville 

Johnson, T. . . . Steubenville 

Johnson, W. H Middletown 

*Johnson, W, R Steubenville 

Johnston,F. T. Bucyrus 

Jones, J. W Cincinnati 

Jones, T. A Venedocia 

Jones, W. D Newark 

Jtidge, J. F., M.D Cincinnati 

Judd, O. S Spencerville 

♦Kaestlen, S. E Cleveland 

Kallmeyer, F. G Cincinnati 

♦Kalter, G. W Dayton 

K^mpfmueller, C. Cincinnati 

Kapper, M. Canton 

Karb, O. J . . Columbus 

Kauffman, G. B Columbus 

Kauffman, L. B Columbus 

Kautz, F. A Cincinnati 

Kayser, W Wapakoneta 

Keiper, F Cleveland 

Keiper, L Cleveland 

Kelley, W. W Ottawa 

» 



Kelts, H. B Steubenville 

Kerr, C. D Gallipolis 

Kieffer, G Cleveland 

Kilboutne, H. A Canton 

King, F. H Cincinnati 

Kiplinger, J. W West Salem 

Kipp, W Greenville 

Kirkenda'l, C. F Akron 

Kirchhofer, P. P Massillon 

Klahr, J. A Bloomville 

K'aycr, C. F - Cincinnati 

Klayer, L Cincinnati 

Klein, D Madisonville 

Klein, S Cincinnati 

Knapp, D. A Kilbourn 

Kneeland, C. A Conneaut 

Koehnken, H. H Cincinnati 

Koenig, J. H Cincinnati 

Koch, H Cincinnati 

Kolb, A Columbus 

Koons, C. W Canton 

*Krauter, C. H '. .Youngstown 

Kuerze, R. M Cincinnati 

Kuhlmder, H Cleveland 

Kuqua, S.J Springfield 

Kurfurst, H. F Dayton 

*Kutchbauch, J. F Dayton 

Kylius, G. W Cincinnati 

Lace, J. H Cleveland 

Laffer, J. M Akron 

Lammert, C. J Cincinnati 

Lamparter, J. O Akron 

Lane, £. B. Cleveland 

Landers, G. W Cincinnati 

Lansing, R. H Chillicothe 

Lash, £. R Athens 

Latin, G Dayton 

Laubach, G. R Wooster 

*Lautenschlager, G. C Dayton 

Law, G. F ..Willoughby 

Lawson, D. J Warsaw 

♦Lehmkuhl, J. B Hamilton 

Leitzell, A. D Seville 

Lehr, J Cleveland 



144 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



LeJir, P Cleveland 

Lehrer, C. A Sandusky 

LeQuesne, A. A. K Cleveland 

LeQaesne, H J. N Cleveland 

Lewis, A. C Bucyras 

Lewis, ^ L Hamden Junction 

•Lewis, B. G Girard 

Lewis, E. D Jackson 

Lickes, R. P Steuben villc 

Liggett, N. E Marysville 

Lindscy, E. H Mansfield 

Lisle, J. D., M.D Springfield 

Lloyd, C. G Cincinnati 

Lloyd, J. U Cincinnati 

Lloyd, N. A Cincinnati 

Lohman, O. F Clevelann 

Long, J. M ' Cincinnati 

Long, W. A Steubwnville 

Luce, J. D Urbana 

Luckey, G. W South Charleston 

Ludlow, C Springfield 

Luster, S. W Cleveland 

Lytle, J. B., M D Unionport 

Lynn, G. A Mineral Ridge 

Lyle, J. B Fredericksburg 

McCarter, E. N Columbus 

McClain, M. H . .Galion 

McConnell, D Green Springs 

McConney, W. T At water Station 

McCormick, J. T Xeoia 

McCoy, F Cleveland 

McCoy, J. N Kenton 

McCulIocb, R. S Fremont 

McCullough, A. H Mansfield 

McDonaM, S. S New Lexington 

McDowell, O. H Medina 

McFarland, T. D Canton 

McGiughey, I. H Hubbard 

McGill, W. W Salineville 

McConagle, A. B Brilliant 

Mcllvaine, J. J Cleveland 

McKean, C. W Salincville 

McKee, W. H Athens 

McKeown, S. W Youngstown 



McKtmmie, J. W Clariogton 

Maddox, W Ripley 

Maddox, W. E Ripley 

*Manabach, O. A Columbus 

Markle, S. M. fi Ashland 

Marmon, J. Y Lima 

Macquardt, J. F Tiffin 

Mason, C. C Columbus 

Martin, W. J Cincinnati 

*Matti8on, T. C Berea 

Maxwell, G. F West Liberty 

May, A. F Qeveland 

Mayell, A Cleveland 

Meggenbofen, E Chillicothe 

Meiminger, A Cincinnati 

Melsheimer, E. J Shelby 

Merrell, G Cincinnati 

Metcalt, L. J Cleveland 

Meyer, J Lima 

Meyer, W Lima 

•Meyer, W. V Cleveland 

Miller, C. M Mansfield 

♦Miller, G. H Cleveland 

Miller, L. A bteubenville 

Miller, P. B Gettysburg 

Montanut!, P. £ Springfield 

Moon, D. H Blanchesier 

Mooney, M. L Cardington 

♦Moore, C. A Cambridge 

Moore, J. C West Mansfield 

Morgan, C. H Cleveland 

Moiganthaler, P Massillon 

Mon, T. N West Salem 

Morris, W. E New Holland 

Morrison, R. J Steubenville 

Mo?s, J. W New Richland 

Mueller, C. H Cincinnati 

Mund, J. F Cleveland 

Murdock, A. W Bellefontaine 

Murray, F. M., M.D Bluffton 

Murray, S. W Washington C.H 

Myers, D Cleveland 

Myers, G. S Carey 

Nachtrieb, C. J Wauseon 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



MS 



♦NeflF, B., M.D New Carlisle 

Neff, C. H New Carlisle 

♦Nelson, J. W., M.D Springfield 

Nemec, J. A Cleveland 

Newcomb, N. O Cleveland 

Nichols, E. S Canton 

Nichols, J Columbus 

Nichol?, J. M Columbus 

Nipgen, J. A . . Chillicothe 

Noble, W.W Berea 

Noell, C. H Van Wert 

Norris, E. P Cleverand 

Norwood, T. F. Cincinnati 

Nye, C. N Canton 

Nye, D. H Toledo 

Nye, H. L Zanesville 

O'Brien. Wm Cleveland 

Ogan, F. W Jamestown 

Ogier, W. R Columbus 

Ohier, J. ... .Fremont 

Olliger. L. P Wooster 

*Openhimer, J. H Canton 

Opperman, E Cleveland 

Orr, W. C Columbus 

Otis, J. C Cincinnati 

Ovcrbeck, B. H., Jr Cincinnati 

Overholser, S. H West Manchester 

Palmer, J. G . . .Conneaut 

Pape, Josephine Sandusky 

Park, W. H , Elyria 

Parsons, G. F Troy 

Parsons, R Cleveland 

Patterson, J. A St. Clairsville 

Patterson, J. J St. C'airsville 

Patrick, M Norwalk 

Payne, C. E Port Clinton 

Peck, E. D Toledo 

Peck, J. H Cleveland 

Peters, E. J. . . , Akron 

Peters, V. O Shelby 

Petersilge, A Cleveland 

Peters, C. C Zanesville 

Patton, J. G Newark 

Peyton, W. T Manchester 



♦Pfeiffer, J Akron 

PfifFner, F. J. R Delaware 

Phillips, C. W Cincinnati 

Phleger, W. F Sandusky 

Piercy, C. G Wilshire 

•Plath, O. E Cincinnati 

Pohlmeyer, E. A Cincinnati 

Pope, J Burgoon 

Porter, E. D Cleveland 

Porter, F Paulding 

♦Porter, L. R Cleveland 

Potts, J. C Bellevue 

Pretzinger, R Dayton 

Price, A. Q Swanton 

Probeck, G. ) Cleveland 

Prokaska, O. F. Ph. G Ak^on 

Pruden, D : Dayton 

Pugh, G. C Toronto 

Purdy, T. L Covington 

Pyle, S. B Richmond 

Quinlin, W. A Loramie 

Quinn, J. W Hillsboro 

Rabe, H. H Clyde 

Rauchfuss, O Cincinnati 

Rauchkclb, J Co'umbns 

Rave, H Cleveland 

Read, J. A Wau«eon 

Read, M. E Wauseon 

Reaser, E. W Ashland 

Reasoner, M.D Bellaire 

Reber, B C Logan 

Reed, C. D Pomeroy 

Reed, E. . .« Portsmouth 

Reed, E. M. Ph. G Middletown 

Reed, I. N Toledo 

Rees, J. N South Charleston 

Reid, H Lebanon 

Reinert, L., Jr Columbus 

Reisinger, L. K Galion 

Rendigs, C. P Cincinnati 

Reul, W. W Delphos 

Reum, H. F Cincinnati 

Rhoads, W. L Ashland 

Rice. B. F Newton Falls 



146 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



Richards, J. W Columbus 

Richcy, S. C Oxford 

Richmond, £. A Massillon 

Richter, S. F., Philo, P. O. Taylorsville 

Ridgley, W. F SteubenvUlc 

Ridgway, B. G Cedarvillc 

Ridgway, C Yellow Springs 

Ridgway, CM Springfield 

♦Ritter, L. F Columbus 

Roberts, C. A Springfield 

Robertson, N. L Dayton 

Robinson, E. J London 

Robinson, G. R Cleveland 

♦Robinson, W. L Gallipolis 

*Rockwood, C. H North Amherst 

•Roe, R. B Elyria 

Bogers, N. P *. Kingston 

Roller, J. L " Toledo 

Roller, R. S... Wooster 

Rose water, N Cleveland 

Ross, J Wads\yorlh 

Roth, J. C Marion 

Roudabush, D Goshen 

Roy, A. H Baltimore, Md 

Rulmann, R. A Minster 

Ruppert, J Cincinnati 

Rust, B. S Cincinnati 

Ryan, W. J Junction City 

Sachs, E Dayton 

Sage, J. R Prairie Depot 

Samsel, H. S Bloomville 

Sanford, H. S. Lima 

Sanford, S., Jr Lima 

Sauer, L.W Cincinnati 

*Saur, J. C . . Napoleon 

Savidge, G. A McCutchenville 

Schaaf, J. H Gallipolis 

Schaefer, M. B Toledo 

Schambs, G. M Cleveland 

Schellentrager, E. A Cleveland 

Schilling, J. P Louisville 

Schlaubach, E. J Harmar 

*Schoenhut, C. H Cleveland 

Schmidt, A Springfield 



Schmidt, C Brooklyn Village 

Schneider, A Cincinnati 

Schroeder, G. A Cleveland 

•Schueller, A. W Columbus 

Schueller, F. W Columbus 

Schueller, E Columbus 

Schulte, H. J Cincinnati 

Schwartz, J. C Hamilton 

Scott, A. C Columbus 

Scott, I. E Apple Creek 

Seebobn, A. W Pomeroy 

Seltzer, S. T .Columbus 

Seltzer, D. F Akron 

Selzer, E. R Cleveland 

■ Seybert, R. L Hillsboro 

♦Shafer, C. M. Phi C .Canal Fulton 

Shallcross, J. H Columbus 

•Sharpe, J. A Akron 

Sheekley, C. W Cleveland 

♦Sheets," G. F East Palestine 

Shellaberger, E Laura 

Shepherd, J. S Nelsonville 

Sherrick, P. F Delphos 

Sherwood, D. W Cleveland 

•Sherwood, H. J., Jr Cleveland 

Sherwood, L Columbus 

Shotwell, W. D Cincinnati 

Shuesler, J. J Loveland 

ShuU, W. F BtaverDam 

Silberling, J. H Cleveland 

Simmons, A. H Conneaut 

SimonsoB, W Cincinnati 

Skeggs, C. W., M.D. . . .Green Springs 

Slocum, E. L Lancaster 

Slosson, F. W Cleveland 

Smedley, C. W Cincinnati 

Smith. C. A Springfield 

Smith, E. D. F West Richfield 

Smith, E. T West Richfield 

Smith, L. W Byersville 

smith, G. W Cincinnati 

Smith, W. G Hillsboro 

Smith, W. H., M.D Howard 

Smith, W. I Springfield 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



147 



Smith, W. P., Jr Tiffin 

Smithnight, A Cleveland 

Snow, A. G Cleveland 

SoUmann, L Canton 

Sords, T. V Cleveland 

Spangenberg, £ Cincinnati 

Spalding, C. D Gallon 

Spayd, C. E Toledo 

Spencer, C. A Crestline 

Spencer, A New Straiisville 

Spengler, J. G Dayton 

Spenzer, M. H., Miss. . . . . : .Cleveland 

Spencer, P. I., M.D Cleveland 

Spidell, C. E Wilmot 

Spieth, W. F Cleveland 

Spohn, R. C Toledo 

Sponsel, J. G Cincinnati 

Sprague, L. C Pemberville 

Springsteen, W. S. Cleveland 

Stahl, H Sidney 

*Stahlhuth, E. H. W Cincinnati 

Stammel, C. A. .Cincinnati 

Starbird, B. F New London 

Starbird, C New London 

Stausmyer^ C Fremont 

Stecber, H. W Cleveland 

Steele, E. M Steubenville 

Steele, C. H Steubenville 

Steele, W. W Chillicothe 

SteinbofF, A Fort Jennings 

Stenger, E Cincinnati 

Stewart, F Cleveland 

Stewart, H. W Steubenville 

Stierle, J. G Versailles 

Stilson, S. 6 Gilsonburg 

Stoskopf, G Cleveland 

Strobel, J. B Ironton 

Strock, E. E Cleveland 

Strome, J. J Millersburg 

Strong, R. B Jamestown 

Strong, S. M Cleveland 

Stuckenholt, W Cleveland 

Stumm, R. C Wilmington 

Sturgis, J. R Dalton 



Sturgis, T. A Dalton 

Slutz, F. A Ashley 

Slyer, W. H Marietta 

Sulliger, W. R. H Forrest 

Sullivan, E. M Urbana 

Sulzbacker, W. F Chillicothe 

Sykes,. E. A Chicago 

Sweeney, G. W Marion 

Swan, W. S Toledo 

Swingle, J. L Mt. Gilead 

Taggart, P. S New Lexington 

Taylor, F. S , . . Wilmington 

Taylor, J. D Roseville 

Taylor, J. P Mechanicsburg 

Taylor, U. A , Toledo 

♦Terrell, E North RidgeviUe 

Thompson, J Auburndale 

Thompson, H. W Sidney ' 

Thompson, R. A Kent 

Thompson, R. D Akron 

Thomas, E. S Fremont 

Thorp, A Cincinnati 

Thuma, J, W Shauck's, P. O 

Thurston, A Grand Rapids 

Tielke, G Cleveland 

Tiffany, H. B Clyde 

Titsworth, R. L Mt. Victor 

Tobey, C. W Troy 

Tompkins, J. S Avondale 

Trimble, R. C Salem 

Troupe, T. . . . Springfield 

Tschanen, G. W. . . . . . Upper Sandusky 

Tschanen, W Upper Sandusky 

*Tulloss, B. L Akron 

Tupa, F.J Cleveland 

Turney, L. M Holgate 

Tuttle, C, M.D Berlin Heights 

*Tyson, A. D Middletown 

Ullman, W. P Loudonville 

Urban, J. P Cleveland 

Valentine, F. E Springfield 

Van Stone, T Toledo 

Virden, M. H La Rue 

Vogel, A. A Columbus 



148 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 



Vogt, A. L Dtkware 

Voigt, F. H .Holgatc 

Vollnc^le, P. F New Watcrford 

Von Stein, J. H. . . . . .Upper Sandusky 

Vorikamp, H. F Milfoid 

Voss, G. W Cincinnati 

Wagner, H Cincinnati 

Wahmhoff, F. S Delphos 

Wahmhoff, J. H Delphos 

Walding, W. J Toledo 

Walker, F. A Milan 

Walker, J. F Richmond 

Walker, W. P Washingtonville 

Wall, C. L Cambridge 

Walt, E, C CirclevUIe 

Walton, H. C Cincinnati 

VVarner, A Akron 

Warner, A. C Tiffin 

Waterman. H Ravenna 

Weber, C. L Canton 

Webb, F Cincinnati 

Webber, T. J Plymouth 

Weden, A. M Cleveland 

Weichsel, E Cleveland 

Weil, J Findlay 

WeUer, J. J Cleveland 

Weisbrodr, G MiHdletown 

Wellcr, W. A Zanesville 

WeUs, J. D Cincinnati 

WcUs, W. P Zanesville 

Wenning, G. H Cincinnati 

Werner, W. M. Painesville 

♦Wertz. W. H. H Dalton 

West, C Toledo 

Wessj. E., M.D St, Clairsville 

West, W. K Toledo 

West, W. L., M.O Matamoras 

West, S. S Cleveland 

WeusthofT, O. S Dayton 

Weyer, J Cincinnati 

Wheeler, A. C Lima 



White, E. B ... .Lancaster 

While, J. B Bellaire 

•White, W. E Middlepoint 

Whitteker. B ...Cincinnati 

Widney, H. M Zacesville 

Wildenthaler, G. A Sandusky 

Willman, E. P Smithville 

Williams, E. R Nevada 

WmUms, R. G Alliance 

Wilson, A. C Piqua 

Wilson, W. C ClaiksOTi 

Wmkleman,' F. J Cincinnati 

Winslow, H. G. Cincinnati 

Winters, A Ironton 

Wisterman, I Shanes Crossing 

Witschncr, M. G ...Tiffin 

Wolf, C. P., M.D WUmot 

*Wood, A Cleveland 

Wood, J. M., M.D Hepburn 

•Woods, F. M Warren 

Woodward, N. G Defiance 

Worley, G Covington 

Worthington, A. F Cincinnati 

Wrede, H Cincinnati 

Wright, H Belmont 

Wright, W. C Cleveland 

Wnrtzbacher, L. H Delaware 

Wyker, J. D Fiedei icktown 

Yorston, M. M Cincinnati 

Youmans; D. A Akron 

*Young, F. H Lima 

Zartman, D . . Independence, Butler P. O 

Zeiser, A. L Cincinnati 

Zeller, A Dayton 

Zickes, O Cleveland 

Zigler, W. A FostorU 

Zimmerman, J Wooster 

Zimmerman, J. R Wooster 

Zimmerman, L. P Fremont 

Zuenkeler, J. F Cincinnati 

Zn emer, J. A Columbus 



OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



149 



ROLL OF MEMBERS. 



Bedford, P. W., Prof., - 
Maisch, J. M., Prof., 
Mohr, Cbas., 
Remington, J. P., Prof., 
Squibb, E. R., M.D., - 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

- New York, 
Philadelphia, 

• Mobile, Ala., 
Philadelphia, 

- Brooklyn, 



1883 
1882 
1887 
1883 
1882 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 

Members are requested to report any inaccuracies in these lists, and to notify the 
Secretary and Treasurer of all changes of address. 

Warner, A., - - 1886 

- 1886 Youmans, D. A., - - 1883 

Alliance, Stark Co. 



Ada, Harding Co. 
Ashbrook, C. S., 

Akron, Summit Co. 
Alexander, W. W., 
Allen, S. E., 
liallenger, C. S., 
Blocker, H. C, 
Byrider, J., - 
Cadwell, S. D., M.D., 
Case, S. H., 
Crites, H., 
Davis, W. P., 
Frederick, J. M., 
Gilman, C. S., 
Grether, John, - 
Hart, D. P., 
Himmelman, G. C, 
Inman, C. T., 
Inman, S. C«, 
Kirkendall, C. F., - 
Lamparter, J. O., 
Laffer, J. M., 
Peters, E. J., • - 
Pfeiffer, J., - 
Prokaska, O. F., Ph. G., 
Sclzer, D. F., 
Sharpe, J. A., - 
Tulloss, B. L., - 
Thompson, R. D., - 



1886 
1886 
1886 
1882 
1887 
1883 
1885 
1886 
1886 

1887 
1887 
1883 

1879 
1886 
1884 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1883 
1887 
1887 
1886 



Cassaday, A. S., - - 1884 

Fogle, G. T., - - . 1881 

Williams, R. G., - - - 1882 

Apple Creek, Wayne Co. 

Scott, I. E., - - - 1882 

Ashland, Ashland, Co. 

Markle, S. M. B., - - 1882 

Reaser, E. W., - - - 1880 

Rhoads, W. L., - - 1884 

Ashley, Delaware Co. 

Stutz, F. A., - - . 1882 

Ashtabula, Ashubula, Co. 
Hickok, H. M., - - 1883 

Athens, Athens Co. 

Henderson, C. B., - - 1883 

Lash, E. R., - . 1881 

McKee, W. H., - . 1885 

Atwater Station, Portage Co. 

McConncy, W. T., - 1884 

Aubumdale, Lucas Co. 
Thompson, J., - - - 1881 

Bainbridge, Cross Co. 
Beardsley, W. P., - . 1884 

Dunn, F. H., - - - i88i 

Bamesville, Belmont Co. 
Ely, E. S., - - . 1885 



150 



omO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL j tMmw i w .sr]I^K 



B«aver Dam, Allen Co. 




Brooklyn Village, Cuyahoga Co 




ShuU, H. F., . 


1886 


Schmitt,, Carl 


188a 


Bellaire, Belmont Co. 




Bucynis, Crawford Co. 




Darrah, D. H., 


1882 


Farquhar, W., - 


1887 


Feeley, Wm. D., 


1883 


Fulton, M. D., 


1880 


Reasoner, M. D., 


1882 


Johnston, F. T., 


1879 


White,;. B., - 


1884 


Lewis, A. C, 


1881 


Bellefontaine, Logan Co. 




Burbank, Wayne Co. 




Case, F. S., 


1880 


Fisher, A., 


1883 


Murdock, A. W., 


1880 


Burgoon, Sandusky Co. 


%f 


Belleville, Richland 0. 




Pope, J 


1880 


Hare, A. W., 


1884 


Byesville, Guernsey Co. 




Totts, J. C, 


1883 


Smith, L. W., - 


1884 


BattersoD, Mrs. E. F., 


1883 


CaldweU. 




Bellevue, Huron Co. 




Burgess, M. S., 


1887 


Blinker, J^ H. , 


1885 


Cambridge, Guernsey Co. 


• 


Cupp, C. v., 


1885 


Downar, J. R., - 


1882 


Hutchings, J. H., 


1884 


Hawthorne, D. M., 


1884 


Belmont, Belmont Co. 




Hutchbon, J. C, 


1882 


Wright, H., - 


1884 


Moore, C. A., 


1887 


Berea» Cuyahoga Co. 




Wall, C. L., . 


1884 


MatiisoD, T. C, 


1887 


Camden, Preble Co. 


V 


Noble, W. W., 


1883 


Bohn, J. H., 


1884 


Berling Heights, Erie Co. 




Canal Fulton, Stark Co. 




Tuttle, C, M.D., 


1886 


Bevard, H., - 


1882 


Bettsville, Seneca Co. 




Shafer, C. M., Ph. C, 


1887 


Hitchman, A., . 


1881 


Canton, Surk Co. 


' 


Blanchester, Clinton Co. 




Barr, S. £., 


1882 


Baldwin, F. M., 


1886 


Blum, F., Jr., 


1885 


Moon, D. H., 


1884 


Chapman, C. F., 


1881 


Bloomville, Seneca Co. 




Douds, A. H., 


1884 


Klahr, J. A., - 


1881 


Kapper, M., - 


1884 


Samsel, H. S., 


1881 


Kilbourne, H. A., - 


1884 


BIuflFton, Allen Co. 




Koons, C. W., - 


I88I 


Bracelin, H., - 


1880 


McFarland, T. D., - 


1884 


Hauenstein, A., 


1883 


Nichols, E. S., - 


I88I 


Brecksville, Cuyahoga Co. 




Nye, C. N., 


1884 


Ellsworth, C. S., 


1886 


Openhimer, J. H., 


1887 


W " ^^ " y 


M VJV^X^ 


SoUmann, L., 


1884 
1884 


Bridgeport, Behnont Co. 




Weber, C. L., - 


Dent, J. C, 


1884 


Cardington, Morrow Co. 


— ■«<~T 


Judkins, T. C, 


1884 


Mooney, M. L., 


1879 


Brilliant, Lawrence Ca 




Carey, Wyandot Co. 




McGonagle, A. B., 


1884 


Carothers, W., - 


1879 






Myers, G. S., 


1884 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



151 



Cedarvillei Greene Co. 
Ridgway, B. G., 

Cheviot, Hamilton Co. 
Hildreth, N. G., 

Chicago, Huron Co. 
Sykes, E. A., - • 

ChilHcothe, Ross Co. 
Baumgartner, F,, 
Davis, J. M., 
Howson, A. B., 
HowsoD, W. H., 
Lansing, R. H., 
Meggenbofen, K, 
Nipgen, J. A., 
Steel, W. W., - 
Sulzbacker, W. F., 

Cincinnati, Hamilton Co. 
Adderley, W. H., 
Ayers, J. M., M.D., 
Ayers, Mary A., 
Bain; A. W., 
Bain, F. W. 
Bayer, E. W., 
Betz, O. E., 
Bigler, O., - 
Boehmer, A. L., 
Oe Lang, A., 
Do<Jgc. J. M., - 
Egar, Geo., 
Eichberg, J. H., 
Elfcrs, J. C, 
Evan.% J. S., 
Fabing, J., - 
Fallon, J. M., - 
Feemster, J. H., 
Feemster, W. , 
Fennel, C. T. P., 
Forbes, J. W., 
Fratz, J. G., 
Fromme, A., 
Gleick, Wm. M., 
Goodman, E*, 
Gordon, W. J. M., 



Greve, T. L. A., 

1886 Greyer, J., 

Griffith, H. H., 

1884 Groenland, R., 

Hale, S. J. (Avondale), 

1884 Hall, W. J., 
Harrison, J. M., 

1880 Hawkins, R. L., 

1880 Heinemann, A., 

1885 Heinemann, O., 

1 88 1 Heister, J. P., 

1880 Herwig, C. A., 

1 88 1 Hoffman, J., 
1880 Hofling, A. J., 

1882 HoUenbeck, E. F., 
1884 HoUenbeck, M. W., 

Hovekamp, J. J., 

1884 Irwin, J. L., 

1879 Jacobi, A., - 
1882 Jones, J. W., 

1882 Judge, J. F., M.D., 
1884 Kallmeyer, F. G., 
1884 Kampfmueller, C., 
1884 Kautz, F. A., - 

1880 King, F. H., 

1883 Klayer. C. F., - 

1886 Klayer, L., - 
1880 Klein, S., 

1880 Koebnken, H. H., - 

1884 Koening, J. H., 

1883 Koch, H., - 

1884 Kuerze, R. M., • 
1884 Kylius, G. W., 

1882 Lammert, C. J., 
1884 Landers, G. W., 
1884 Lloyd. C. G., - 
1884 Lloyd, J. U., 

1883 Lloyd, N. Ashley, 

1883 Long, J. M., 

1884 Martin, W. J., - 
1883 Meininger, A., 
1880 Merrell, Geo., - 
18S4 Mueller, C. H., 



1881 
1881 
1884 
1886 
1884 
1884 
1884 
1884 
1886 
1884 
1884 
1880 
1884 
1884 
1882 
1884 
1881 
1884 
1884 
1880 
1879 
1886 
1884 
1880 
1886 
1883 
1881 
1884 
1880 
1881 
1886 
1881 
1884 
1882 
1884 
1886 

1879- 
1880 

1880 

1881 

1881 

1880 

1884 



152 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 



Norwood, T. F., - 1884 

Otis, J. C, - - 1882 

Ovcrbeck, B. H., Jr., - - 1880 

PhUlips, C. W., - - 1882 

PUth, O. E., - . - - 1887 

Poblmeyer, E. A., - • 1880 

Rauchiiiss, O., - • 1880 

Rendigs, C. P., - • 1884 

Reum, H. F., - - - 1881 

Rnppert, J., - • 1879 

Rust, B. S., - - - 1884 

Sauer, L. W., - - 1884 

Schneider, A., - - - 1886 

Schulte, H. J., - - 1883 

Shot well, W. D., . - 1886 

SimoDSon, W., . - 1885 

Smcdley, C. W., - - 1884 

Smith, G. W., 1884 

Spangenberg, E., - - 1884 

Sponsel, J. G., - 1884 

Stammel, C. A., • - 1884 

Stahlhuth, E. H. W., 1887 

Stenger, E., - - - 1884 

Tompkins, J. S. (Avondale), 1884 

Thorp, A., - - - 1884 

Vortkamp, H. F., - - 1884 

Voss, G. W. - - 1883 

Wagner, H., - 1886 

Walton, H. C, ■ 1882 

Wcbb^ F., . 1883 

WclLs, J. D., - - - 1882 

Wenning, G. H., - - 1884 

Weyer,J., - - 1879 

Whitteker, B., - 1885 

Winkleman, F. J., - - 1884 

Winslow, H. G., - - 1884 

Worthington, A. F., - - 1884 

Wredc, H., - - - 1881 

Yorston, M. M., • - 1882 

Zeiser, A. L*, - • 1884 

Zuenkeler, J. F., • • 1884 

Circleville, Pickaway Co. 

Evans, S. B., • - 1882 

Fickardt, F, L., - - 1885 

Walt, E, C, - - 1884 



Clariagtoo, Monroe Co. 




McKimmie, J. W., 


1883 


Clarkson, Coltunbiana Co. 




Wilson, W. C, 


. 1882 


Cleveland, Cu]rahoga Co. 




Acker, P., - 


1883 


Biddle, H. G., - 


. 1883 


Bcnficld, C. W., 


1887 


Bock, A. W., - 


. 1886 


Bock, F., - 


1885 


Bodebendcr, W., 


. 1881 


Bruce, J.i - 


1880 


Bubna, J. V,, - 


■ 1887 


Busch, H. C, M.D., 


1880 


Carpenter, J. H., 


• 1883 


Case, L,, - 


1884 


Glaus, G. T., - 


. 1887 


Cobb, L. A., 


1880 


Cobb, R. L., * 


• 1883 


Culler, F. W.. 


1887 


Deutsch, J. W., 


• 1884 


Drach, G. L., 


1887 


Dreher, L., 


. 1880 


Dresky, J. J., 


1883 


Durstine, F. H., M.D., 


. 1883 


Dnstin, C, H., 


1886 


Elliott, S. T., - - . • 


. 1885 


Fell, J., 


1884 


Fenner, G. H., 


• 1879 


Fenton, C. F., 


1887 


Ferguson, J. R., 


. 1887 


Fischer, E. A., 


1884 


Fischer, H. J., - 


. 1887 


Flandermeyer, H. D., 


1884 


Flandermeyer, H. H., - 


• 1880 


Flood, W.'h., 


1880 


Forrest, J. T., - 


■ 1886 


Fortlage, J. H., 


1885 


Gaylord, H. C, 


. 1880 


Gaube, E., • 


1887 


Gegelein, F. L., 


' i88o 


Gehrung, J. M., 


1885 


George, A, H., 


• 1882 


George, R. H., 


1887 



OmO STATE PKAKMACEUTICAL AJSaOCIATIOV. 



IS3 



Gcrstacker, M., 
deim, J. C, 
Gltnes, G. W., - 
Godman, C. A., 
Giosse, W. F., - 
Haag, G. D., 
Haber, L. A., - 
Hall, L. B., 
Hart, W. T., . 
Hartness, W. H., 
Hechler, G. L., 
Heller, M. M., 
Hoehn, J., 
Honecker, A., 
Honecker, J. J., 
Hopp, L. C, 
Horst, J. H., 
HqU, H. M., 
Kaestlen, S. £., 
Keiper, F., - 
Keiper, L., 
Kieffer, G., - 
Kuhlmeier, H., • 
Lace, J. H., 
Lane, £. B., 
Lehr, John, - 
Lehr, P., 

LeQuesne, H. J. N., 
LeQuesne, A. A. K., 
Lohmann, O. F., 
Luster, S. W., - 
McCoy, F,, - 
Mcllvaine, J. J., 
May, A. F., 
Mayell, A., 
Metcalf, L. J., 
Meyer, W. V., 
Miller, G. H.. 
Morgan, C. H., 
Mund, J. F., 
Myers, Daniel, 
Nemec, J. A., 
Newcomb, N. O., 
Norris, E. P., 



1882 


O'Brien, Wm., - 


1887 


Opperman, £., 


1880 


Parsons, R., 


1883 


Peck, J. H., 


1884 


Petersilge, A., 


1884 


Porter, E. D., 


I88I 


Porter, L. R., 


1880 


Probeck, G. J„ 


1882 


Rave, H., 


1880 


Robinson, G. R., 


1880 


Rosewater, N., 


1880 


Schambs, G. M., 


1883 


Schellentrager, E. A., 


I88I 


'Schoenhut, C. H., - 


IS84 


Schroeder, G. A., 


1879 


Selzer, E. R., 


1885 


Sheekley, C. W., 


1884 


Sherwood, D. W., - 


1887 


Sherwood, H. J., Jr., 


1884 


Silberling, J. H., 


1880 


Slosson, F. W., 


1880 


Smithnight, A., 


1883 


Snow, A. G., 


1883 


Sords, T. v.. 


1880 


Spenzer, Mary H., 


1886 


Spenzer, P. L, M.D., 


1880 


Spieth, W. F., 


1884 


Springsteen, W. S., 


1882 


Stecher, H. W., 


1880 


Stewart, F., 


1883 


Stoskopf, Geo., 


1882 


Strock, E. E., 


1882 


Strong, S. M., 


1880 


Stuckenholt, W., 


1879 


Tielke, G., 


1883 


Tupa, F.J., 


1887 


Urban, J. P., - 


1887 


Weden, A. M., 


1880 


Weichsel, E., 


1883 


WeUer, J. J., 


1880 


West, S. S., 


1883 


Wood, A., - 


1884 


Wright, W. C, 


1883 


Zickes, 0., - 



1884 
I88I 
1880 
I88I 
1880 
1882 

1887 
1885 

1880 

1885 

1879 
mz 
1880 
1887 

i8«4 
1885 

1881 

1885 
1887 

.1884 
1882 
i860 

i8«3 
1885 

1883 
1880 

1879 
1885 

1883 

1882 

1884 

1884 

1883 

1883 
1885 
1885 
1880 
1884 
1884 
1881 

1879 
1887 

1882 

1886 



154 



OBIO STATE PBABIIACEVTICAL ASSOCJATTOlf. 



Cleves, Hamilton Co. 




Raaschkolb, J., 


- 


1881 


Grossman, F. A., 


1884 


Reinert, L. Jr., 


- 


1884 


Qyde, 3aDdusky Co. 




Richards, J. W., 


- 


1886 


Rabe, H. H., 


1883 


Ritter, L. F., 


- 


1887 


Tiffany, H. B., - 


1883 


Schneller, A. W., 


- • 


1887 


CoaltoD, Jacksbo Co. 




Schneller, E%, 


- 


1879 


Friedland, J. F., 


1884 


Schueller, F. W., 


- 


1880 


College Corner, Butler Ca 




Scott, A. C, 


- 


1880 


Cokefair, C B., 


1884 


Seltzer, S. T., 


- 


1885 


Huston, J. C, 


1884 


Shallcross, J. H., 


- 


1884 


Columbiana, Columbiana Co. 




Sherwood, L., 


« • 


1879 


Ink, C. E., - - - 


1884 


Vogel, A. A., 


- 


1879 


Columbus, Franklin Co. 


• 


Zwemer, J. A., 


- 


1880 


Ackerman, J. N., 


1879 


Columbus Grove, Putnam Co. 




Bauer, F. A., - 


1883 


Hauck, T., - 


- 


1884 


Benner, C. C, 


1882 


Conneaut, Ashtabula Co. 




Berger, J., Jr., 


1882 


Guthrie, J. H., - 


- 


1882 


Braun, H., - 


1879 


Kneeland, C. A., 


- 


1883 


BrodbecW, W. T. , 


1883 


Palmer, J. G., 


- 


1883 


Brown, W. C, 


1886 


Simons, A. H., 


- 


1885 


Bruck, P. H., - 


1879 


Coming, Perry Co. 




Byrne, John, 


1884 


Foreaker, J. W., 


- 


1883 


Cook, H. C, - 


1884 


Covington, Miami Co. 




Cook, J. R., 


1879 


Purdy, T. L., 


- 


1884 


Cornell, C. R., - 


1879 


Worley, G., 


• * 


1882 


Edwards, E. B., - 


1884 


Crestline, Crawford Co. 




Gibson, C. J., - 


1883 


Spencer, C. A., 


- 


1883 


Harmon, M. M., 


1886 


Dalton, Wayne 


Co. 




Herbst, F. W., - 


1879 


Sturgis, J. R., 


- 


t882 


Hoffman, O. L., 


1883 


Sturgis, T. A., 


« 


1883 


HoUinger, Thos., 


1883 


Weitz, W. H. H., 


- 


1887 


Holman, H. N., 


1883 


Dayton, Montgomery Co. 




Huston, Chas., 


1879 


Abbey, J., - 


- 


1882 


Karb, G. J., 


1882 


Abbey, W. W., - 


- 


1882 


Kauffman, G. B., 


1879 


Bonner, CD., 


- 


1887 


Kolb, A., - 


1882 


Burkitt, J. L., 


m *■ 


1880 


McCarter, E, N., 


1879 


Burkhardt, M. A., 


• 


1886 


Mand aback, P. A., - 


1887 


Carnell, H. D., 


- 


1880 


*Mason, C. C, - 


1884 


Daugherty, J. U., 


. - 


1880 


Nichols, J., 


1880 


Dietz, J. C, 


m m 


1880 


Nichols, J. M., 


1881 


Dixon, G. M., 


- 


1880 


Ogier, W. R., - - - 


1879 


Godfrey, C. P., - 


* • 


1885 


Orr, W. C; 


1883 


Hebner, A., 


• 


1880 


* Removed to Buchtel, O. 







OHIO STATE PHABMACEnTICAL'.AaaOCIATION. 



15s 



Hoover, Z.T., 


1880 


East Toledo, Lucas Co. 




Hyers, W. H., 


1880 


Bach, W. J., 


1880 


Isaacs, B. S., - - - 


1887 


Cook, H. D., - - - 


1882 


Kalter, G. W.. 


1887 


Cook, W. S., 


1881 


Kutchbauch, J: F., 


1887 


Hamlin, R. E., - 


1881 


Kurfurst, H. F., - 


1887 


El3n<ia, Lorain Co. 




Latin, G., - - - 


1880 


Eady, H. J., 


1882 


Lautenschlager, G. C, 


1880 


Hill, F. P., - - - 


1883 


Pretzinger, R., - 


1880 


Park, W. H., 


1883 


Pniden, D., 


1880 


Roe, R. B., • - 


1887 


Robertson, N. L., 


1881 


Fayetteville, Brown Co. 




Sachs, E., - 


1880 


Fitzpatrick, S. J., - 


1882 


Spengler, J. G., 


1882 


Findlay, Hancock Co. 




Weusthoff, 0. S., 


1879 


Black, W. R., - 


1881 


ZtWttt Abia, 


1880 


Chad wick. W. M.. - 


1883 


Defiance, Defiance Co. 




Haven, W. H., - - - 


1880 


Colby, W. D., 


1881 


Huber, J. M., 


t88i 


Woodward, N. G., 


1883 


Weil, J. 


1882 


Delaware, Delaware Co. 




Forest, Hardin Co. 




Aigin, S. C, 


1885 


Dull, L. K, 


1885 


Carter, G. H., - 


1880 


Sulliger, W. R. H., 


1880 


PfiflFner, F. J. R., - 


1880 


Fort Jennings, Putnam Co. 




Vogt, A. L„ 


1886 


Steinhoff, A., 


1882 


Wurtzbacher, L. H., 


1886 


Fostoria, Seneca Co. 




Delhi, Hamilfbn Co. 




Esbelman, L. J., 


1884 


Carpenter, S. W., 


1882 


Zigler, W. A., 


1884 


Delphofi, Allen Co. 




Fredericksburg, Wayne Co. 




Evans, H. W., 


1881 


Lytic, J. B., 


1883 


Evans, J. W., 


1882 


Fredericktown, Knox Co. 




Reul, W. W., 


1881 


Hosach, C, 


1882 


Sherrick, P. F., - 


1886 


Wyker,J. D., - - - 


1883 


Wahmhoff,;. H., . 


1880 


■ 

Fremont, Sandusky Co. 




Wahmhoff, F. S., 


1882 


Grund, H. C, 


1880 


Doylestown, Wayne Co. 




McCulloch. R, S., 


1881 


Hochstetler, J. C, - 


1885 


Ohler,J., 


1883 


Dresden, Muskingum Co. 




Stausmyer, C, 


1883 


Hornung, J., - 


1882 


Thomas, E. S., 


1880 


East Palestine, Columbiana Co. 




Zimnjerman, L. P., - 


1880 


Frazer, H. J„ 


1882 


GaIion« Crawford Co. 




Greenamyer, E., M.D., - 


1884 


Hackedorn, M. L., 


1880 


Sheets, G. F., 


1887 


McClain. M. H., - . - 


1880 


East Springfield. Jefferson Co. 




Reisinger, L. K., - • . 


1881 


Baird, R., 


1882 


Spaulding, CD., 


1883 



iS6 



OHIO STATE PBABMACEVTICAL ASaOClATtOH. 



GalUpolia, GiOIU Co. 
Gmisam, C. W., 

Kew, C. D., 

RobtDsoD, W. L., 

SoUaf, J. H., . 


1887 
1882 
1887 
1882 


Georgetown, Brown Co. 

CHwey, J. N., 


1886 


Germantown, Montgomery Co. 

Hildabolt, C. W., 


1887 


Gettysburg, Darke Co. 
MUlcr, P. B., 


1884 


Girard, TrumbuU Co. 
Lewis, B. G., - 


1887 


Gibflonburg, Sandusky Co. 
Sttlfion, S. B., 


1881 


Goshen, Clermont Co. 
Roudabush, D., 


1882 


Grand Rapids. Wood Co. 
Gardner, A. J., M.D., 
ThttKton, A., - 


1 881 
1885 


Granville, Licking Co. 
Bryant, C. W., 


1884 


Greenfield, Highland Co. 
Cleaveland, C. H., 


1884 


Greensburg, Trumbull Co. 

Crane, R. W., 


1884 


Green Springs, Seneca Co. 
Mc€onnell,D., 
Skegg?, C. W., M.D., 


1884 
1884 


Greenville, Darke Co. 

Kipp. W.. 


1881 


Groveport, Franklin Co. 
Eyraan, L. E., 


1885 


Hamden Junction, Vinlon Co. 
Lewis, A. L., - 


1882 


Hamilton, Butler Co. 

Doeller, G., 
Lehmkuhl, J. B., 
Schwartz, J. C, 


1883 
1887 
1880 


Hamar, Washington Co. 
Buchanan, C. R., 
Schlaubach, E. J., 


1884 
1885 


Hayesville, Ashland Co. 
Brant, E. D., • 


1885 



Hepburn, Hardin Ca 
Wood, J. M., M.D., - 1883 

HiUsboco, Highland Co. 

Davis, W. H. C, - 1882 
Hilton, L. R., - 1883 

Quinn, J. W., - - 1880 

Seybert, R. L., • 1880 

Smith, W. G., - 1880 

Holgate, Henry Co. 
Tnroey, L. M., - 1881 

Voigt,F. H., - - - 1881 

Hohnesville, Holmes Ca 
Hoy, B. F., - - 1884 

Howard, Knox Co. 
Smith, W. H., M.D., • • 1883 

Hubbaid, TramteU Co. 

Bonnell, D. W., . 1884 

Cramer, S. P., - - 1884 

McGaughey, L H., 1885 

Hudson, Summit Co. 
Bestley, £. S., - 1882 

Iberia, Morrow Co. 
Crane, £. J., - - - 1884 

Independence, Richland Co. (Butler P. O.) 
Zartman, D., - 1884 

Ironton, Lawrence Co. 

Davies, T. C, - - - 1883 

Strobel, J. B., 1884 

Winters, A., - - - 1881 

Jackson, Jackson Co. 
Hale, W. F., M.D., 1884 

Lewis, E. D., - - - 1884 

Jamestown, Greene Co. 
Ogan, F. W., - 1882 

Strong, R. B., - - - 1880 

Jefferson, Ashtabula Co. 
Hawley, A. K., - i883 

Jeffersonville, Fayette, Co. 
Davis, C. W., - - - 1887 

Junction City, Pierry Co. 
Ryan, W. J., - 1882 

Kent, Portage Co. 
Thompson, R. A., - - 1883 



OHIO STATE PBABMACJCUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



157 



Kenton, Hardin Co. 




Lorain, Lorain Co. 




Dean, W. D., 


1885 


Jewitt, W. A., 


1884 


McCoy, J. N., - 


1879 


Loramie, Shelby Co. 




Kilbourn. Delaware Co. 




Quinlin, W. H.. 


1884 


Knapp, Delia A., - 


1885 


London, Madison Co. 




Kingston, Ross Co. 




Atchispn, J. R., 


1884 


Rogers, N. P., - 


1884 


Robinson, E. J., 


1880 


Lancaster, Fairfield Co. 




Loudonville, Ashland Co. 


• 


Beck, J. W.. 


1882 


Ullman, W. P., 


1881 


Bellermann, J. H., 


1881 


Louisville, Stark Co. 




Slocum, £. L., 


1882 


Schillingr, J. P., 


1885 


White. E. B., . 


1882 


Loveland, Clermont Co. 




La Rue, Marion Co. 




Shuesler, J. J., 


1882 


Campbell, W. J., - 


1881 


McCutchenville, Wyandott Co 




Virden, M. H., 


1883 


Savidge, G. D., 


1885 


Laura, Miami Co. 




McConnellsville, Morgan Co. 




Shellaberger, £., - 


1886 


Alexander, E. V., 


1882 


Lebanon, Warren Co. 




Madisonville, Hamilton Co. 




Reid, H., 


1881 


Klein, D., 


1882 


Leetonia, Columbiana Co. 




• 

Manchester, Allen Co. 




Harper, C. B., 


1887 


Peyton, W. T., 


1881 


Ink, H. H., - 


1886 


Mansfield, Richland Co. 




Liberty Center, Henry Co. 




Finfrock, M. V. B., 


1882 


Foncanon, G. U., 


1883 


Lindsey, E. H., 


1883 


Lima, Allen Co. 




McCullough, A. H., 


1885 


Barrere, G. W., 


1884 


Miller, C. M., - 


1881 


Brenner, C. E., 


1886 


Marietta, Washington Co. 




Gilbert. A. W., 


1885 


Allen, E. H., - 


1881 


Harley, J. P., - 


1887 


Bukey, J. S., 


1884 


Marmon, J. Y., 


1882 


Gaitree, W. B., 


1884 


Meyer, J., 


1884 


Richards, E. T., 


1884 


Meyer, Woi., 


1884 


Styer, W. H.. - 


1880 


Sanford, H. S., 


1882 


Marion, Marion Co. 




Sanford, S., Jr., 


1882 


Denison, L., 


1885 


Wheeler, A. F., 


1884 


*Flocken, L. H., 


1886 


Young, F. H., 


1887 


Hinds, J. W., • 


1884 


Loclcland, Hamilton Co. 




Hoberman, H. C, 


1883 


Gilbert, H. A., 


1884 


Roth, J. C, 


1884 


Logan, Hocking Co. 




Sweney, G. W., 


1885 


Bort,L. 0., 


1887 


Marysville. Union Co. 




Case, F. S, - 


1880 


Anderson, W. P., 


1881 


Harrington, F., 


1879 


Field, J. W., 


1880 


Rebcr, B. C, - 


1884 


Liggett, N. E., 


1881 



^Correspondent for Marion Co. 



153 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASaOCIATION 



Metamoras, Fultoo Co. 
West, W. L.. M.D.. 1885 

Massillon, Surk Co. 

Baltrley, Z.T., - - 1882 

Eisenhour, C. L., - 1887 

Johnson, J. D., - - 1882 

Kirchhofcr, P. P., - "1882 

Morganthaler, P., ■ 1883 

Richmond, £. A., • - 1885 

Mechjuiicsburgh, Champaign Co. 
Taylor. J. P., - - 1886 

Medina, Medina Co. 
Albro, W. H., - - 1881 

McDowell, O. H., - 1883 

Mendon, Meroer Co. 
Be van, J., . 1882 

MiamisbuTK, Montgomery Co. 
Bohn. M. G.. - - 1880 

Middletown, Butler Co. 

Johnson, C. B., - 1884 

Johnson, W H., - 1886 

Reed, E. M. Ph. C, - - 1880 

Tyson, A. D., 1887 

Weistbrodt, G., - - 1884 

Middle Point, Van Wert Co. 
White, W.E., . 1887 

Milan, Erie Co. 
Walker, F. A., - 1885 

Milford, Clermont Co. 
Vortkamp, H. F., - - 1884 

Millersburg, Holmes Co. 
Strome, J. J., - 1882 

Mineral, Athens Co. 
Coleman, J. C, - 1885 

Mineral Ridge, Trumbull Co. 
Lynn, G. A., - - 1886 

Minerva, Stark Co. 
Hoopes, W. W., - - 1884 

Minster, Auglaize Co. 
Rulmann, R. A., - 1884 

Morristown, Belmont Co. 
Fisher, J. v., - - - 1882 

Mt. Gilead,: Morrow Co. 
Swingle, J. L., - - 1880 



Mt. Sterling, Madison Co. 
Clark, C. A., • . . 1885 

Mt Vernon, Knox Co. 
Baker, G. R., - • 1882 

Baker, P. A., - - - 1883 

Mt. Victory, Hardin Ca 
TiUworth, R. L., • . 1884 

Napoleon, Henry Ca. 

Saur, J. C, - - - 1887 

Navarre, Stark Co. 
Grossklaus, J. F., - - 1882 

Nclsooville, Athens Co. 
Hickman, W. G., - . 1882 

Shepherd, J. S., - - 1883 

Nevada, Wyandot Co. 

Belford, Pr. E. A., - 1886 

Goodbread, J. N., - - 1881 

Williams, E. R., - - 1883 

Newark, Licking Co. 

Collins, F. A , . < 1880 

Jones, W. C, - - 1881 

Patton, J. G., - - - 1885 

New Bremen, Auglaise Co. 
Hoffman, J. L., - - 1881 

New Burlington, Clinton Co. 
Collet t, O. F., - - - 1884 

New Carlisle, Clark Ca 
Ncff, C. H., - - 1882 

Neff, B., M.D„ - - 1887 

New Concord, Muskingum Co. 
Johnson, C. S., • - 1882 

New Holland, Pickaway Co. 
Morris, W. E., - - - 1884 

New Lexington. Perry Co (Highland P.O.) 
Bonar, R. S., - 1884 

New Lexington, Perry Co. 
McDonald, S. S., - 1886 

Taggart, P. S., - - 1885 

New Lisbon, Columbiana Co. 

Brown, F. A., - - - 1883 

Deemer, C. H., • - 1883 

New London, Huron Co. 

Starbird, B. F., - - 1884 

Star bird, C, • 1884 



OHIO STATE PHABMACSUTICAL ASaOCIATION. 



159 



New Richmond, Clermont Co. 

Fleher, J. C, - - - 1881 

Moss, J. W., - - 1882 

New Straitsville, Perry Co. 

Spencer, H., - • • 1884 

Newton Falls, Trumbull Co. 

Carlisle, F. L., - 1884 

Rice, B. P., - - - 1883 

New Waterford, Columbiana Co. 
VoUnogle, P. F., - - 1884 

North Amherst, Lorain Co. 
Rockwood, C. H., - - 1887 

North Ridgeville, Lorain Co. 

Terrell, E., - - 1888 

Norwalk, Huron Co. 
Benedict, D. D., M.D., - 1880 

Patrick, M., - - 1883 

Orrville, Wayne Co. 
Blankenhorn, H., • - 1884 

Ottawa, Putman Co. 
Graham, A., Jr., ' > 1886 

Kelley, W. W., - : 1881 

Oxford, Butler Co. 
Gillard, W. H., - - 1884 

Richey, S. C, - - 1884 

Painesville, Lake Co. 
Werner, W. M., - - 1886 

Paulding, Paulding Co. 
Porter, F., - - 1886 

Pemberviile, Wood Co. 
Sprague, L. C, • - 1882 

Perrysburg, Wood Co. 
Champney, A. R., - • '1881 

Champney, W. R., - - 1881 

(Philo P. O.) Taylorsville, Muskingum Co. 
Richter, S. F., - - 1882 

Piqua, Miami Co. 
Wilson, A. C, - - 1880 

Plymouth, Richland Co. 
Webber, T. J., - - 1885 

Pomeroy, Meigs Co. 

Reed, CD, - - - 1882 

Seebohm, A. W., - - 1881 



Portsmouth, Scioto Co. 

Amann, C. E., Sr., - - 1881 

Amann, C. E., Jr., • 1881 

Amann, F., - • - 1881 

Reed, E., - - • 1881 

Port Clinton, Ottawa Co. 
Payne, C. E., - - - 1886 

Port Washington, Tuscarawas Co. 

Cornet, L. A., • - 1882 

Comet, G. A., - - 1887 

Powhatan Belmont Co. 
Beane, J. H., - - 1887 

^Prairie Depot, Wood Co. 

Sage, J. R., - - - 1 884 

Prospect, Marion Co. 
Cook, F. M., . 1886 

Ravenna, Portage Co. 
Waterman, H., - 1884 

Richmond, Jeflferson Co. 
Pyle, S. B., - - 1882 

Walker, J. F., - - 1884 

Republic, Seneca Co. 
Charles, X. F., - - 1886 

Deutler, S. S., - - 1886 

Richwood, Union Co. 
Conkright, A. B., 1886 

Hill, C. E., - - - 1884 

Ripley, Brown Co. 

Black, C. T., - - 1885 

Maddox, W. E., - 1884 

Maddox, W., - - 1884 

Rocky Ridge, Ottawa Co. 
Barringer, D., M.D., - - 1885 

Roseville, Muskingum Co. 
Taylor, J. D., - - 1882 

Rushsylvania, Logan Co. 
Doran, I. A., - - 1886 

St. Clairsville, Bellmont Co. 



Hoge, J. B.. 


1882 


Patterson, J. A., 


- 1882 


Patterson, J. J., 


1882 


West, J. E., M.D., 


- 1882 



i6o 



OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



St. Mary's, Auglaize Co. 
Hauss, J. J., 1886 

St. Paris, Champaign Co. 

Fiedler, G. W., - - 1884 

Salem, Columbiana Co. 
Bolfijer, J. C, - - 1883 

DcRhodes, F., - - 1885 

French, L. B., - 1883 

Hawkins, M. S., - - 1880 

Trimble, R. P., - - 1884 

Salincville, Columbiana Co. 

McGillW. W., - 1883 
McKean,C. W., - 1884 

Sandusky, Erie Co. 

Arnold. D. R., - 1884 
Biehl, L. A., - 1884 

Dick, C, - - - 1885 

Emrich,J.H., - - 1885 

Hauser, J. C, - 188 1 
Henkelman, H. K., 1884 

Lehrer, C. A., - - - 1881 

Melville, W.M., 1884 

Pape, Josephine, - -1885 

Phleger, W. F., - 1885 

Wildenthaler, G. A., - - 1884 

Sardinia, Brown Co. 
Glenn, A. H., - - 1882 

Seville, Medina Co. 

Boise, J. C, - - 1887 
Leitzell, A. D., - - 1885 

Shane's Crosung, Mercer Co. 

Wisterman, I., - ■ 1885 

Shauck's P. O., Morrow Co. 
Thuma, J. W., - 1884 

Shelby, Richland Co. 

Melsheimer, E. J., - - 1883 

Peters, V. O., - - 1885 

Shiloh, Richland Co. 

Fenner, J.C., - - 1883 

Shreve, Wairnc Co. 
Cunningham, J. C, - 1884 

Sidney, Shelby Co. 
Amann, C, - - " 1881 

Amann, F. O., - - 1884 



Stahl, H., . 1883 

Thompson, H. W., - 1881 

Smithville, Wayne Co. 

Willaman, F. P., - - 1884 

Somersst, Perry Co. 

Clayton, E. P., - 1882 

South Charleston, Clarke Co. 

Hudson, W. J., 1882 

Luckey, G. W., - 1884 

Bees, J. N., • 1886 

Spenoerville, Allen Co. 

Beard, J. M., - - 1885 

Jndd, O. S., - 1882 

Springfield, Clarke Co- 

Bakbaus,A., - - 1882 

Beck, J. I., - - - 1886 

Burton, G. F., - 1880 

Casper, T. J., M.D., - 1879 

Coblentz, F. H., - - 1886 

CoblenU, G., 1887 

Coblentz, V., - - 1882 

Goebel, C. W., - 1886 

Heister, U. S., - - 1887 

HoUoway, W. G., 1887 

Kuqua, S. J., - - 1886 

Lisle, J. D., M.D., 1884 

Ludlow, C., - - 1880 

Montanus, P. E., 1882 

Nelson, J. W., M.D., - - 1887 

Ridgway, CM., 1886 

Roberts, C. A., - - 1882 

Schmidt, A., 1886 

Smith, C. A., - • - 1880 

Smith, W. L, 1882 

Troupe, Theo., - 1880 

Valentine, F. E., - 1886 

Steubenville, Jefferson Co. 

Beall,W.M. - - 1884 

Beany, W. W., - 1884 

Burgoyne, W. R.. - 1884 

Carnahan, J., - 1882 

Carnahan. W. G., - - 1884 

Foley, J. B., - - 1884 

Foster, A. M., - - - 1884 



OHIO STATS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



l6l 



Johnson, J. M., 


- 


1884 


Peck, E. D., 


1881 


Johnson, T., 




- 1882 


Roller, J. L., 


i«8i 


Johnson, W. R., 


- 


1887 


Reed, I. N., - 


1881 


Kells, H. B., 




- 1884 


Schaefer, M. B., 


1881 


Lickes, R. P., 


- 


1884 


Spayd, C. E., - 


1881 


Long, W. A., 




- 1882 


Spohn, R. C, 


1881 


Miller, L. A., 


- 


1884 


Swan, W. S., • 


1881 


Morrison, R. J., 




- 1884 


Taylor, U. B., 


1883 


Ridgley, W. F., 


• 


1884 


Vanstone, T., 


1881 


Steele, C. H., 




• 1884 


Walding, W. J., 


1881 


Steele, E. M., 




• 1884 


West, C, . - - 


1881 


Stewart, H. W., 


- 


1884 


West, W. K., 


1881 


Summerfield, Noble Co. 




Toronto, Jefferson Co. 




Dew, J. T., 


- 


- 1882 


Pugh, G. C, - 


18S4 


Swanton, 


Fulton Co. 




Troy, Miami Cb. 




Price, A. Q., 


- 


1886 


Parsons, G. F., 


1880 


Sylvania, 


Lucas Co. 




Tobey, C. W., 


1879 


Hank, T. B., M.D. 


» 


- 1884 


Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas Co. 




Tiffin, Seneca Co. 




Francis, H. S., 


1882 


Fleck, J. J., 


- 


1880 


Unionport, Jeiferson Co. 




Hubbard, E. B., 


• 


- 1884 


Dunlap, G. G., 


1884 


Marquardt, J. F. , 


- 


1881 


Lyle, J. P., M.D., 


1886 


Smith, W. P., Jr., 


• 


- 1883 


Upper Sandusky, Wyandot Co. 




Warner, A. C, 


m m 


1885 


Altenberger, P. J., - 


1887 


Witschner, M. G., 


. 


- 1884 


Berg, F., 


1880 


Tiro, Crawford Co. 




Tschanen, G. W., 


1882 


Jeffrey, D. G., 


• • 


1883 


Tschanen, W., 


1883 


Jeffrey, F. M., 


- 


- 1883 


. Von Stein, J. H., 


1879 


Toledo, 


Lucas Co. 




Urbana, ChampaiKu Co. 




Bartlett, W., 


■ ■ 


1881 


Col well, J. M., 


1880 


Bower, F. T., - 


. 


- 1881 


Connor, J. O., 


1882 


Buck well, A. J., 


- 


1881 


Cramer, G. W., 


1881 


Burger, A., 


- 


• 1881 


Fisler, I., - 


1882 


Cheney, F. J., 


- 


1881 


Luce, J. D., 


1885 


Crosby, C. M., 


- 


- 1881 


Sullivan, E. M., 


1885 


Danforth, E. C, 


- 


1881 


Van Wert. Van Wert Co. 




Daniels, Thos., 


- 


- 188 1 


Gackenbeimer, L. F., - 


1882 


Frazer, G. M., 


« • 


1883 


Gackenheimer, M. U., 


1886 


Friedrich, J. F., 


- 


- 1887 


Hines, J. A., 


1887 


Fisher, G. H., 


- 


1881 


Noell, C. H., 


1882 


Gysel, R., 


- 


- 1881 


Vermillion. Erie Co. 




Heitzman, A. ■ 


- 


1881 


Baumhart, C. C, 


1887 


Heydrich, L., - 


* 


- 1881 


Versailles. Darke Co. 




Nye. D. H., 


" • 


1881 


Stierle, J. G., 


1885 



l62 



OmO STATS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



Wadsworth, Medina Co. 




Smith, E. D. F., 


1884 


Curtis, C, A., 


1884 


Smith, E. T., 


1884 


Ross, J. D., 


1883 


West Salem, Wayne Co. 




Wapakoneta, Auglaize Co. 




Gable, D., r 


1883 


Franke, A., 


1884 


Kiplinger, J. W., 


1884 


Fuelling, D., - 


1884 


Morr, T. N., - 


1883 


KajTser, Wm., 


1885 


West Unity, WUliams Co. 




Warsaw, Coshocton Co. 




Denman, W. M., 


1884 


Lawson, D. J., - 


1882 


Wharton, Wyandot Co. 




Washington Court House, Fayette Co. 


Clark, S.L., 


1883 


fioyer, H., 


1880 


Cole, C. W., 


1884 


Brown, T. F., - 


1880 


Ireman, J. W., - 


1883 


Donnan, E. V., 


1882 


White House, Lucas Co. 




Ellis, T. B., 


1887 


Heath, F. M., 


1881 


Murray, S. W., 


1886 


Williamsbun^f Clermont Co. 




Washingtonville, Mahoning Co. 




Beall, A., . . - 


1882 


Walker, W. P., 


1884 


Willoughby, Lake Co. 




WatRrtown, Washington Co. 




Law, G. F., 


1885 


Bohl, Conrad, 


1881 


Wilmington, Clinton Co. 




Wauseon, Fulton Co. 




Brown, G. W., 


1885 


Collins, E. A., 


1886 


Foland, D. J., 


1881 


Nachtrieb, C. J., 


188 1 


Stumm, R. C, 


1885 


Read, J. A., 


1883 


Taylor, F. S., 


1885 


Read, M. E., 


1883 


Wilshire, Van Wert Co. 




Waverly, Pike Co. 




Piercy, C. G., - 


1885 


Adams, A. A., - 


1882 


Wihnot, Stark Co. 




Blaser, J. T., 


1887 


Spidell, C. E.. 


1884 


Dean, A. H., 


1887 


Wolf, C. P., M.D., 


1884 


Hutt, P.. - - 


1887 


Winchester, Adams Co. 




Wellington, Lorain Co. 




Doyle, S., - - 


1884 


Felt, F. D., 


1884 


WoodviUe. Sandusky Co. 




West Alexandria, Preble Co. 




Busch, A., 


1884 


Davis, J. E., 


1884 


Busch, H., M.D, 


1883 


West Jefferson, Madison Co. 




Carey, M. J., M.D., 


1885 


Bradley, Quin, 


1882 


Wooster, Wayne Co. 




West Liberty, Logan Co. 




Boyd, S. H., 


1886 


Gill, D. W., 


1886 


Donnelly, F. H., 


1883 


Maxwell, G. F., 


1886 


Laubach, G. R., 


1883 


West Manchester,. Preble Co. 




Ohliger, L. P., - 


1884 


Overholser, S. H., - 


1884 


Roller, R. S., 


1883 


West Mansfield, Logan Co. 




Zimmerman, J., 


1884 


Moore, J. C, - 


1886 


Zimmerman, J. R., 


1884 


West Richfield, Summit Co. 




Xenia, Greene Co. 




Haefele, G. L., M.D., 


1887 


Farrell, H. J., 


1886 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



163 



Fleming, E. C, 




1880 


McCormick, J. T., 


- 


18S4 


Yellow Springs, Greene Co. 




Ridgway, C, - 


- 


1879 


Youngstown, Mahoning Co. 




Averbeck, M. J., 


- 


1883 


Hall, C. F., 


- 


1882 


Krauter, C. H., 


- 


1887 


McKeown, S. W., 


- 


1884 


Zanesville, Muskingum Co. 




Baush, K. M., - 


- 


1881 


Chappelear, F. B., - 


- 


1882 


Graham, C. V., 


- 


1882 


Graham, W. H., 


- 


1881 


Hatton, E. M., 


• 


1880 


Johnson, J. R., 


- 


1882 


Nye, H. L., 


- 


1882 


Peters, D. Z., 


- 


1880 


Weller, W. A., 


. 


1880 


Wells, W. P., 


- 


1881 


Widney, H. M., 


- 


1883 


CALIFORNIA. 






Los Angeles. 






Buehler, J. J., 


- 


1887 


San Francisco, 319 California St. 




Rosen feld, E. A., 


"V 


1884 


Stockton. 






Sanford, J. A., 


- 


1880 


COLORADO. 






SaliHa. 






Thurber, A. R., 


- 


1883 


ILLINOIS. 






Rock Falls, White Side Co. 


(Box 393.) 


Flexer, A. W., 


- 


1885 


Teutopolis, Effingham 


I Co. 




Schiml, A. J., 


- 


1880 


INDIANA. 






Peru. 






Leist, J. L., Ph. C, 


- 


1880 


Plymouth, Marshall 


Co. 




Hoyt, C H., 


- 


1882 



IOWA. 

Clinton. 

John, J. M., - - - 1881 

KANSAS. 

Lyons, Rice Co. 

Magoffin, A. E., - - 1881 

KENTUCKY. 

Louisville, 4th and Market Sts. 

Pardick, B. J., - 1884 

Schmuck, F. £., 840 Baxter Ave., 1880 

Preston, cor. Broadway. 
Schneider, A. W., - -1886 

MAINE. 

Cumberland Mills. 

Starr, H. G., - - 1883 

MARYLAND. 

Baltimore. 

Roy, A. H., - - • 1881 

MISSOURI. 

Peirce City. 

Armstrong, G. R., - - 187Q 

NEBRASKi^. 

Omaha. 

Holman, J. H., - 1883 

NEW YORK. 

New York City, 338 Broadway. 

Renter, W., - - 1881 

Jamestown. 
Dronberger, L. R., - - 1882 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
• Philadelphia, 2d and Poplar Sts. 
Bohn, C. H., Ph. G., - 1880 

Pittsburgh, 300 Frankstown Ave. 
Shrimplin, L. D., - • 1883 

Sewickly. 
John W. Edwards, - 1886 

CHINA. 
Philander Smith Memorial Hospjtal, Nanking* 
Beebe, R. C,, M.D., • 1882 



164 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



DECEASED. 



Elccud. Deceased. 

Adolph, A Columbus. 1881 1883 

Andrcss,J. E Berlin HeighU 1885 1886 

Bau8h,W.F Zancsville 1882 1886 

Benedict, J. I Cleveland 1880 1884 

Bixel,E Cleveland 1880 i88n 

Blocksom, H. W Zancsville 1881 1882 

BoHman, C. J Mansfield 1884 1884 

Bryant, E. D Circleville 1884 1886 

Cleveland, J. S Burton 1883 1884 

Coblemz. J. P Springfield 1880 1883 

Conwell, E. T Cleveland 1883 1885 

Dover, Thos Dayton 1880 1881 

Doyle, C. H Chillicothe 1880 1883 

Faust, C Cincinnati 1879 1886 

Fennel, A Cincinnati 1880 1884 

Fleming, £. M Miamisburg 1880 1804 

Foote,N. W Wellington 1883 1883 

Goehring, Phil Ricewood 1882 1883 

Hickox, L. A Akron 1882 1883 

King, A. P. London 1880 1882 

Kistners E. C Cincinnati 1884 1886 

Lawyer, L Milford 1883 1885 

Leick,R. H Cleveland 1884 1885 

Limb, A. A Akron 1883 1885 

fticClun, CM Columbiana 1885 1885 

Miller, H. L Pittsburgh, Pa 1882 1886 

Minear, A. W. S Athens 1885 1886 

Muntell, H Cincinnati... 1884 1885 

Neuhart, L. A. Caldwell 1882 1883 

Nicolay, S. J Hamilton 1882 1887 

Piymire, L. E Sabina 1882 1883 

Rehfus. C. A Lima 1882 1886 

Reum, H. F Cincinnati*..... 1881 1886 

Sherrick, P. F Delphos..- 1886 1868 

Smith, A London 1889 1882 

Spayd, G. H Toledo 1881 1884 

Steiner, M. B Kenton 1881 1882 

Thayer, G.M Toledo 1881 1885 

Uthe, J. F North Amherst 1884 1889 

Wagner, A Cincinnati 1882 1886 

Wines, F. E Vermillion 1885 1886 

Wolfe, H. H Springfield 1881 1884 



OHIO STATE PHASUACEVTICAL ASSOCIATION. 1 65 



RESIGNED. 



Elected. Resigned. 

Buell, W. H Marietta i88« ^^ 

Dolph, W. H .'. Elmore 1884 '885 

Everette, E. S Portland. Me 1880 1884 

Glaser, C. H Norwalk 1881 1876 

Heister L Cincinnati 1880 1885 

Heister, E. M Cleveland I'JSo i^ 

Hoyt, H. H North Fairfield 1882 1886 

Jones T. A Venedocia 1882 1886 

Lee, E. S Roscoe '882 i8»6 

Lippert, O. C. F Cincinnati '880 1882 

Merrell. A. H Cincinnati 1884 l8»6 

Seymour, F. W Wheeling. W. Va 1881 1887 

Weichsel, F Cleveland 1881 l8»6 

West, C. W Toledo 1881 '884 



i66 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATIOX. 



DROPPED FROM THE ROLL 

FOR NON-PAYMENT OP DUES. 



Elected. 

Allen, C. S., Cleveland 1880 

Allen, J., Montpelier 1880 

Allen, £. H., Eaton 1880 

Aknoyed, W., Dresden 1882 

Arick, C. V., Newark 1882 

Arthur, W., Columbus 1882 

Backus, J. A., Grand Rapids.'. . . . 1881 

Baker, W. A., Urbana 1883 

Binkerd, A. W., Lima 1880 

Bittner, G. C, Toledo 1881 

Byrnes, R. M. M. D., Cincinnati. .1879 

Chapman, W. C, Toledo 1881 

Clark, W. T., Willoughby 1883 

Coblentz, C, Cleveland 1879 

Compton, J. E., Coshocton 1882 

Conly, J . J., Great Bend, Ind 1880 

Conner, G. W., Xenia 1880 

Cromwell, G. O., Mansfield 1881 

Darrah, J. E., Fargo 1882 

Davies, E. E., Milwaukee, Wis. . . 1880 

Deems, W. C, Columbus 1883 

Dietrich, J. W., Carthage, Mo. . . . 1880 

Eysenbach, H. P., Delphos 1882 

Gardner, R. H ., Columbus 1881 

Gore, H. W., Salem 1883 

Gossler, T. J., London 1882 

Grand, Girard, H. E., Circ]eville..i88i 

Hays, J. S., Chicago, 111 1883 

Hirst, J. J., Yel!ow Springs, 1879 

Hirst, T. C, Yellow Springs 1879 

Ho^lin, Phil., Newcomerstown 1881 

Irwin, C. L., Mansfield 1881 

Jones, E. C, South Charleston. ...1880 
Lewis, J. E., Troy 1880 

Total number of Active Members elected, 
Number of Deaths, .... 

Number of Resignations, 
Number Dropped from Roll 



Elected. 

Lyon, C. W., Spring Valley 1880 

McComley, R. K., Bridgeport 1882 

McLaughlin, J . D . , Butler 1882 

Myers, F. W., East Liverpool 1880 

Myers, J. A., East Liverpool 1880 

Newhart, D., Jr., Caldwell 1882 

Newlove, B., Marysville 1879 

Nickerson, C. L., Lima 1883 

Page, F. D., Tiffin 1884 

Pearce, L. McArthur 1883 

Richards, A. J., Marietta 1881 

Roberts, L., Stotttsville| 1882 

Ruff, W., St. Paul, Minn 1881 

Samulesi S. E., Columbus 1879 

Scarborough, £. W., Cincinnati. . 188^ 

Schuerroan, F., Cincinnati 1881 

Schultz, B. F., Kenton 1881 

Scribner, J. J., Mt Vernon 1880 

Shaw, J., Zanesville 1882 

Shinn, E., Dayton 1880 

Siddall, E. E., FindUy 1882 

Sipc, W. F., Sarahsville 1882 

Slater, J. W., Ironton 1881 

Smith, L., Xenia 1880 

Somers, H., Canton 1881 

Spayde, W. H., Helena 1881 

Stinchcomb, C . L . , Canton 1882 

Thomas, C. F., Cincinnati 1880 

Troll, C. W., St Clairsville 1871 

Van Law, J. D., Bellaire 1889 

Van Loon, W. C, Cincinnati . . . 1881 

Vaupel, C. P., Cleveland 18,^ 

Wetzel, 0. H., Lancaster 1882 

Zimmer, F. P., Omaha, Neb 1882 

1,082 
42 

. • 68 



Number of Members out of the State, 



Total Membership in the State, 



22 



145 



937 



OBIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



167 



LIST OF PHARMACISTS 

Registered in 1884. Re-registered in 1887. 



0894 Abbey, J Dayton 1649 

0466 Abbey, W. J Dayton 2158 

2009 Abbott Lafayette Clearport 0710 

0474 Acker, P Cleveland 1683 

0650 Ackermann, J. N 'Columbus 2555 

1487 Ackerman, P. J ..... . Columbus 0376 

0672 Ackley, I. L Oak wood 0222 

0784 Adams, A. A Waverly 1794 

1441 Adams, £. C Elyria 1 100 

1626 Adams, E. W Wellington 1090 

1976 Adams, J. H. .. .Fort Recovery 1430 

1975 Adams, J. F....Fort Recovery 1431 

0900 Adams, Louise M Warren 1909 

0051 Adams, N. B Belpre 1732 

0271 Adams, W. H Cincinnati 0914 

0371 Adderley, W. H Cincinnati 0739 

0350 Adsit, Orson....' Sylvania 0741 

1774 Ailer, J. F.. ..New Washington 0740 

0745 Akeroyd, Wm Dresden 1619 

0333 Aldrich, D. L Weston 2067 

0655 Aldrich, F. J Rising Sun 0243 

1540 Aldridge, John D Sarahsville 0984 

0251 Albert, L. A Jamton 2090 

0088 Albro, W. H Medina 1713 

1898 Allen, A. A Toledo 1207 

0279 Allen, E. H., Jr Maretta 0105 

0120 Allen, John E Columbiana 0056 

0669 Allen, F. L Kent 0662 

1819 Allen, Thos. M Portland 1943 

15 14 Allen, John R Mt. Oreb 0052 

1695 Allen, S. E Akron 0798 

1030 Alexander, C. C Cleveland 2 103 

1694 Alexander, W. W.. ....Akron 0848 

1084 Alexander, John,McConnellsville 1668 

0982 Althaus, Henry. .Taylor's Creek 0250 

0209 Althaus, Fred.,Jr,Taylor's Creek 1584 

0280 Amann, C Sidney 1583 

1045 Amann, C. E., Sr. .Portsmouth 2535 

0554 Amann, Frank Portsmouth 1669 

1599 Anderson, Chas. E.. Coshocton 1867 

1600 Anderson, John Coshocton 1 35 1 

1776 Anderson, W. P Marysville 1350 

1775 Anderson, John W .. Marysville 1352 
2150 Anderson, Leroy K.. Coshocton 0329 

0491 Anderson, J. W Urbana 2075 

1397 Anderson, R. R. . . Mowrystown 0834 

1476 Andrews, A. H Dupton 1321 



Andrews, R. S Seal 

Andrews, John A Carthage 

Andrews, W. C Cortland 

Angler, A. E C«Iumbus 

Anliker, Otto E Toledo 

Aplin, C. F Carbon Hill 

Armour, E. E. . . .Chagrin Falls 

Armstrong, L. L Cincinnati 

Armstrong, P. M..New Lisbon 

Arnold, D. R Sandusky 

Arnold, G. L Cambridge 

Arnold, Maud Cambridge 

Arnold, J. P Lore City 

Ash, L, B Ashland 

Asher, J. H .Sedalia 

Ashton, A. S , . , . Piqua 

Ashton, D. T. Piqua 

Ashton, W. B Piqua 

Ashton, E Lima 

Asplin, John H Cleveland 

Atkinson, F. A. Cadiz 

Atchison, J. R London 

Austin, EL Plymouth 

Austin, George., Celina 

Austin, W. C Geneva 

Axline, A. A Fultonham 

Axline, C. E Lancaster 

Ayers, H. C Sidney 

Ayers, James M Cincinnati 

Ayers, Mary A Cincinnati 

Bach, W.J East Toledo 

Bahrenburg, C. H Marion 

Bailey, A. D Ridge way 

Bailey, F. P Zanesville 

Bailey, Geo East Toledo 

Bailey, John C. Pioneer 

Bailey, S. L Pioneer 

Bailey, Wheeler J Columbus 

Bailey, Willi** Zanesville 

Bailey, Wm. N . . East Liverpool 

Baird, C. C Pataskala 

Baird, H. H Pataskala 

Baird, Joseph Pataskala 

Baird, J. H • Pataskala 

Baird, Robt....East Springfield 

Baker, B. F St. Paris 

Baker, D. W Columbus 



1 68 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



0328 Baker, George R....Mt. Vernon 2050 

1154 Baker, P. A Birmiogham 1164 

0143 Baker, P. A Mt. Vernon 0428 

0558 Baker, R. F Thomville 2 191 

1078 Bakhaus, Adolph Springfield 0556 

1944 Bakhaus, Edmund Cincinnati 1637 

1267 Baldwin, Frank M . . Blanchester 1908 

0927 Ball, T. B Ironton 2053 

0499 Ball, W. F Nilcs 0835 

1864 Ballard, W. A Greenville 1950 

0930 Balsley, W. F Napoleon 1040 

0276 Baltzley, Z . F Massillon 0176 

2063 Bankson, Elliot Edon 0089 

1383 Banter, George W. .Koogle P. O 01 14 

0750 Barnes, F. A Aubtinburg 0022 

1448 Barnes, W. W Auslinburg 2529 

107 1 Barnes, Fred J Painesville 0449 

0658 Barnett, J.N Rix's Mills 0067 

1079 Barr,J. D Marseilles o 195 

1698 Barr, P. H Canton 2159 

0443 Barr, Sam*l E Canton 1066 

0837 Barret, B. S Rutland 2560 

0397 Barringer, D Rocky Ridge 2089 

0555 Barry, T. M Fayetteville 1972 

1693 Bartholomew, A. U Vienna 1971 

1767 Bartholomew, M. S. New Holland 1299 

1566 Bartlett, J. A Cleveland 1757 

1719 Bartlett, G. W Toledo 071 1 

1 720 Bartlett, Wm Toledo 0978 

1004 Barton, Chas. E Norwalk 1 163 

1595 Barton, James Mansfield 0486 

1596 Barton, Wil 1 M Mansfield 0199 

1605 Barton, T. H Syracuse 1097 

1580 Bates, R. C Willoughby 2023 

2522 Bauer, Frank A Columbus 0883 

0227 Bauer, John Cincinnati 0824 

1012 Baumgart, Mrs. J. A.... Lorain 0755 

0095 Baumgartner, F Chillicothe 141 1 

1680 Baush, K. M Zanesville 2166 

1417 Baxter, Minerva J Irondale 1 189 

0005 Beall, Alexander.. Williamsburg 1844 

2017 Beall, John... Cadiz 1696 

1006 Beall, John A Cadiz 1787 

1450 Beall, W. M Steubenville 1334 

0421 Beam, J. H Powhatan Point 0754 

2072 Beany, W. W Steubenville 0947 

1738 Beard, J. M Spencerville 1300 

oicx) Beardsley, W. P Bainbridge 1363 

0254 Beck, John W Lancasti r 001 1 

2101 Beckel, Geo. W Defi«nce 0747 

0897 Beckman, Fred G Delphos 0557 

2157 Beecher, E. N Bellevue 0073 

1556 Beeler, John L Hamilton 0071 

1557 Beeler, S. L . . Hamilton 1999 

2172 Beeman, J Cleveland 1392 



Bcile, C. F Cincinnati 

BeMing, £. C Ravenna 

Belford. H. P GranviUe 

Bell, J. C Stafford 

Benedict, A. E Utica 

Benedict, D. D Norwalk 

Benner, Charles C . . . . Columbus 

Benner, Pedro Cincinnati 

Bennett, La Roy S Lith<H)o1is 

Bentley, Edwin S Hudson 

Berg, Fred Upper Sandusky 

Berger, A. . . . Toledo 

Berger, E. L Crestline 

Berger, Jos.,Jr Columbus 

Bertolett, E. E Shreve 

Berube, Louis N Glendale 

Betz, Otto £ Cincinnati 

Bevan, John Mendon 

Bevard, Henry . . . Canal Fulton 

Beyerle, G. Wm Cleveland 

Biehl, Lewis A Sandusky 

Biddle, H. G Cleveland 

Billhardt, A Upper Sandusky 

Binckley, G. S Kenton 

Binckley, J. W Kenton 

Bingel, Albert Cincinnati 

Bixby, Jerome Castalia 

Black, B. H Freeport 

Black, C, Jr Groveport 

Black, L. K Akron 

Black, W. R Findlay 

Blackburn, A. W Wooster 

Blake, H. B Sidney 

Blakemore, J. W Winchester 

Blankenhom, B Orrville 

Blaser, Jas. T Waverly 

Blass, Charles Cleveland 

Bleckner, Wm....Oak Harbor 

Bleher, J. C New Richmond 

Bliss, C. C Delphos 

Block, John West Alexandria 

Blocker, H. C Akron 

Blood, James C Franklin 

Blum, F. Jr . Canton 

Blythe, Catharine Owensville 

Bock, A. W Cleveland 

Boehmer, A. L Cincinnati 

Boehme, Chas. E . . Germantown 

Bohl» Conrad Waiertown 

Bohn, J. H Camden 

Bohn, M. G Miamisburg 

Boise, James C Seville 

Bolger, J. C Salem 

Bollcs, J. D Bowling Green 

Bonar, R. S Highland P. O 



OBIO STATE PBARMACBUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



169 



1046 Bond, 6. F Vermillion 1022 

0999 Bonnell, D. W Hubbard 0275 

0949 Bonner, Calvin A Dayton 1149 

1500 Bood, J. F Bolivar 1 150 

1360 Borden, Joseph Blackcreek 2537 

1986 Bowles, F. O Laydsville 1370 

0748 Bosserl, O Washington ville 1640 

0141 Bostwick, N. B Newark 2102 

2109 Boswell, Edwin Cincinnati 1833 

0992 Bott, J. H Shawnee 0832 

0181 Bowdle, J, A .... Pleasant ^end 1298 

2511 Bower, F. T Toledo 1125 

2108 Bowers, C. C Port Williams 1671 

0425 Bowie, A. T Bridgeport 12 16 

0273 Boyer, Harry .. Washington C. H 0591 

0912 Boyer, J. M London 0592 

0759 Bracelin, Henry Bluffton 1437 

1835 Braddock, M. J Somerset 031 1 

2163 Bradley, Quinn. . .West Jefferson 2131 

21 1 1 Braineid, C. W. .Mantua Station 1664 

0684 Brand, C. W Mt. Blanchard 1706 

0388 Brant, E.D Hayesville 1707 

0987 Brandt, J. H Lucasville 1937 

0852 Brant, J. W Hayesville 1579 

2534 Braun, Carl L Columbus 1081 

0799 Braun, Herman Columbus 1325 

1052 Breckenridge, B. F Kipton 1082 

1907 Brede, J. H Middletown 2006 

0036 Breese, A. H Mt. Gilead 0520 

0037 Breese, J. M Mt. Gilead 1 123 

1 122 Brehm, L. C Cincinnati 0306 

0145 Brenneman, J. R Elida 1634 

0316 Brenneman, J. W Lindsey 2160 

1231 Briggs, E Cuba 2076 

0019 Briggs, Frank Delta 2082 

1233 Briggs, W. H Mt.Gilead 2514 

1256 Bright, T. N Chagrin Falls 1 171 

2144 Bright, Wm Wellsville 1965 

1562 Brinker, J. H Bellevue 0716 

1678 Brighton, L. S Hagerman 1404 

0186 Bristle, C. D Cincinnati 1970 

0774 Brock, Geo. W Lancaster 1384 

1 226 Brockerman, Geo . . Rushsylvania 0068 

0382 Brongers, John Hinckley 18 14 

0771 Brookins, W. C. M Eaton 2542 

0296 Brooks, A Wellston 1940 

0149 Brown, F. A New Lisbon 1672 

0085 Brown, Geo. W Wilmington 1063 

2525 Brown, J. E Granville 0432 

CX)26 Brown, J. J Springfield 1704 

1712 Brown, R. S Summerfield 0225 

1799 Brown, T. F .. Washington C. H 1475 

i486 Brown, Wilber Sycamore 1774 

0853 Bruce, James Cleveland 1 130 

25 16 Bruck, Philip H Columbus 1 129 



Bryan, E. H Ironton 

Buchanan. C. R Harmon 

Buckland, Ralph P.,Jr. .Fremont 

Buckland, S Fremont 

Buck well, A. J Toledo 

Buell, Wm Akron 

Buell, Wm. H Marietta 

Buffington, J. P Defiance 

Bunn, James W West Union 

Bunn, John Batavia 

Burdsal, Samuel Cincinnati 

Burgoyne, W. R . . . . Steubenville 

Burket, Geo. W Rawson 

Burky, Jacob Shanesville 

Burnett, J. C Sabina 

Burnett, T. M Sabina 

Burns, B. F Findlay 

Burris, C. V Danville 

Burson, G. W . . . . Waynesburgh 

Burson, S. M Hanoverton 

Burtch, A. W Greenwich 

Burtch, Chas. E. . . .Greenwich 

Burton, G. F Springfield 

Burton, W. H Harbor 

Fusch, A Woodville 

Busch Ed.M Elyria 

Busch,H Woodville 

Burkitt, John L Dayton 

Butler, Frank Bellefontaine 

Buttemiller, J. C . . . Cincinnati 

Buxton, H. J Johnstown 

Byrne, John ... Columbus 

Byers, H. M Sycamore 

Byers, Benjamin Vigo 

Byard, D. R Warren 

Byrider, John Akron 

Cad well, David Monroe 

Calkins, Aulhur B. . . .Cleveland 

Callahan, P. A Mingo 

Campbell, G. W Clarksville 

Campbell, J, S Cleveland 

Campbell, W. H Congress 

Campbell, W. J LaRue 

Campbell, Shelby P. . .Aberdeen 

Carmon, N. F Lyons 

Carey, M.J Woodville 

Cargill, H Fort Jefferson 

Carlin, G. A West Salem 

Carlisle, Frank L. .Newton Falls 
Carmack, G. L. North Baltimore 

Carmon, C. E Lyons 

Carnahan, W. S. . ..Steubenville 

Carnahan, James Steubenville 

Carnell, H. D Dayton 

Carnell, H. G Dayton 



tjo 



0^0 STAtiE PHARliACSXJ*rtCAL ASSOCIATtOlf. 



0287 Carothers, W Carey 2146 

0691 Carpenter, S. W Delhi 1472 

1850 Carr, Aaron Liverpool 0139 

1 27 1 Carroll, F. S Cleveland 01 15 

2544 Carsey, John T Portsmouth 0028 

1508 Carson, D. D Palmyra 1852 

0717 Carson, F. K Springfield 0645 

1410 Carter, B. F .Arcanum 0785 

0391 Carter, Geo. Hiram. .. Delaware 1845 

1033 Cartwright, J. W Payne 045 1 

151 1 Carvin, Theodore S Edon 0614 

1369 Case, A. H Milan 2036 

0639 Case, F. S Bellefontaine 0732 

0408 Case, F. S Logan 0972 

0628 Case, J. H Akron 0446 

0973 Casenhiscr C Clinton 0819 

0943 Casio w, R. C. Canal Winchester 1386 

0762 Casper, T. J Springfield 0818 

1023 Cassaday, A. S Alliance 2512 

0681 Cassady, L. L. ..West Layfayette 1199 

2098 Cassady, Julius ... : . . . .Cleves 0817 

1739 Casterline, J. P Painesville 1245 

1 736 Casterline, Z. F Painesville 2070 

U52 Crawley, P. F Fayette 1198 

1 758 Chad wick, W. M Findlay 01 1 1 

1897 Chambers, R, W. .. Mt. Pleasant 0565 

0198 Champney, A. R. . ..Perrysburg 0215 

0769 Chapman, C. H . . North Fairfield 1639 

1250 Chapman, S. D Lorain 0725 

0659 Chappelear, C. F. .. .Zanesville 1414 

0630 Ohapelear, F. B Zanesville 1 767 

0631 Chappelaer, W. M. .. Zanesville 0513 

0632 Chappelear, W. R.... Zanesville 0312 

2176 Charles, I. C Lucas 0823 

1426 Chatfield, F. A Bloomville • 0779 

0836 Cbatten, J. H Milford 1 765 

2556 Cheney, F.J Toledo 1881 

1056 ChiJcote, Wm. H Edgerton 0422 

0826 Chilcote, Joshua Edgerton 1887 

1055 Chilcote, jf. M. Edgerton 1858 

1980 Chittenden, E. S Republic 0813 

2086 Christy, T. H Roseville 2025 

2181 Clancy, C. W Smithfield 1770 

0609 Clark, A. S Beverly 1373 

0138 Clark, B. E Cortland 0188 

1750 Clark, C. A Mt. Sterling 1395 

1841 Clark, D. L Kimbolton 1468 

0666 Clark, F. P North Baltimore 1803 

1989 Clark, S. C Cortland 0634 

1658 Clark, . S. L Wharton 0633 

0670 Claassen, Edo Cleveland 1428 

1014 Clayton, E. P Somerset 1568 

1880 demons, Chas. E Toledo 2022 

1241 Cline, A. M Graysville 0810 

2132 Cline, S. T Lee 1499 



Cline, W. C Wilksville 

Coates, J. W Lebanon 

Coblentz, C Cleveland 

Coblentz, Frank H . . Springfield 

Coblentz, Virgil Springfield 

Coe, Geo. O Edison 

Coe, J. M Mt. Gilead 

Coffman, H.C. Washington, C.H 
Coffman, J. A. .West Alexandria 
Cokefair, Chas. B. College Comer 

Colby, WUlis D. Defiance 

Cole, J. C Montgomery 

Coleman, Geo. E Troy 

Coleman, J. C Mineral 

Collett, O. F. . . New Burlington 

Collins, F. A Newark 

Collins, J. J Deshler 

Collins, Jas. W Newark 

Collins, Paul L. D Newark 

Collins,P. S. Washington C. H. 

Collins. R. F Newark 

Collies, R. J. ..... . .Tontogany 

Colwell, Jas. M Urbana 

Conkright, A. B Richwood 

Conner, B. F Carysville 

Conner, John F. . . .Cumberland 

Connor, John O Urbana 

Converse, A. Z Carroll 

Cook, A Chardon 

Cook, A. B Chardon 

Cook, F. G . . Voungstown 

Cook, Frank M Prospect 

Cook, Geo. W Prospect 

Cook, Harry C Columbus 

Cook, John R Columbus 

Cooke, L. J Geneva 

Cook, Sanford W.. East Toledo 

Cook, T H Scio 

Cook, W. M Madison 

Cooley, Samuel Harriettsville 

Cope, W. M Cleveland 

Cole, P. C Montgomery 

Copeland, E. J Chester 

Corcoran, D. O Oxford 

Corill, J. O Jefferson 

Corn, Jasper Frazeysburgh 

Cornell, J. W Hazelwood 

Cornell, Chas R Columbus 

Cornet, Geo. A, Port Washington 
Cornet, L. A. .Port Washington 

Corry, M. H Xenia 

Cottingham, W. A Troy 

Coulson, E. G Pennsville 

Covert, J. Wells.... Perrysville 
Cowgill, A. B 2^esville 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



171 



1086 Cox,Daniel Martin's Ferry 0477 

1263 Craine, Chas Geneva 0196 

0967 Crane, R. W. Greensburg 13 16 

0490 Cramer, Geo. W Urbana 0749 

1366 Cramer, S. P Hubbard 041 1 

0869 Crane, E. T. Iberia 21 15 

1413 Crawford W.L.. Columbus Grove 2044 

1 38 1 Crawford, S. B Kieferyille 2523 

1753 Crist, F.W Nevada 0977 

1422 Crites, Harvey Akron 0441 

0904 Crites, Geo. W Canal Dover 1099 

1996 Crittenden, C Geneva 2117 

1 85 1 Crittenden Henry W Burton 0389 

2013 Critzer, Mrs. Amelia Ai 0390 

1884 Crosby, C. M Toledo 1036 

0134 Crossland, J. F..St. Clairsville 1484 

2052 Crowther, F. A Cincinnati 1065 

1964 Churchill, S. P Cleveland 1552 

1945 Crumley, C. W Steuben ville 11 59 

1886 CuUison, W. W Toledo 2520 

0224 Cunning, Officer Trenton 0060 

1 1 14 Cunningham, J. C Shreve 1879 

1200 Cupp, Chas. V Bellevue 1956 

0290 Currey, J N Georgeto*n 0988 

1243 Curtis, R. L Marietta 1465 

1662 Curtis, W. P Wadsworth 1355 

21 14 Daily, A. C Lee P. O 1359 

1237 Dalrymple, Frank Hicksville 1728 

095 1 Danforth, E. C Toledo 1 306 

2049 Daniels, Henry G. .. .Cincinnati 0970 

0676 Daniels, Thos Toledo 1899 

0217 Danley, H. M Racine 1632 

1252 Dann, A. T Cincinnati 0157 

01 72 Darrah, D. H Bellaire 1042 

0760 Darrah, J. W Martin's Ferry 1984 

1 174 Davidson, Andrew .... Lancaster 0833 

1 1 73 Davidson, James A. Lancaster 1301 

0182 Davis, Adam Dysons 1009 

2010 Davis, B. F Tontogany 0757 

0197 Davis, C. W JefTersonville 1624 

0338 Davis, Daniel. .. .Midland City 0942 

1647 Davis, D. D Edinburgh 1 176 

0543 Davis, D. J Oak Hill 1333 

0606 Davis, E Middleport 1702 

187 1 Davies, T. C Ironton 1816 

2008 Davis, Frank G . . Tippecanoe City 19 12 

1347 Davis, Jas. M Chillicothe 2035 

0162 Davis, J. D Kent 1217 

1 21 5 Davis, J. E. . . .West Alexandria 0965 

0286 Davis, J. F Portsmouth 1621 

0307 Davis, J. L Kimbolton 1069 

looi Davis, S. H Oberlin 0230 

0322 Davis, W. P Akron 1961 

0253 Davis, W. T Leesburgh 0580 

1855 Davison, Monroe. .West Newton 0581 



Day, H. L New Vienna 

Dean, W. D Kenton 

Decker, Gerhard Cincinnati 

Deckman. W. H Malvern 

Deems, W.C Toronto 

Dehmel, Louis Wyoming 

DeLang, Alfred Cincinnati 

Delphey, Eden V Toledo 

Dempsey, J. A. , Berlin Cross Roads 
Denig, John M . . . . . .Columbus 

Denis, Henry Cincinnati 

Denison, L Marion 

Denman, D. M Cincinnati 

Denman, John Cincinnati 

Denman, Wm. M..West Unity 

Dent, J. C Bridgeport 

Dentler, S. S Republic 

DeRoads,W. H., Franklin Square 
Derrickson, D. K. . . .Springfield 

Deuschle, W. D Chillicothe 

Deutsch, J. W Cleveland 

Dever, Ed Fredericktown 

Dewitt, M. A Cleveland 

Dew, J. T Summerfield 

Dick, C Sandusky 

Dick, W. L Columbus 

Dickson, E. C. . . .Canal Dover 

Dickerson, Geo. Z Malta 

Diehl, Chas Cincinnati 

Diemert, Daniel A. . . .Cleveland 

Deitz, J. C Dayton 

Dittoe Linus L Somerset 

Dixon, Georgdl M Dixon 

Doak, A. S Winchester 

Dodd, G. W Dell Roy 

Doeller, George Hamilton 

Doerr, C. A. ..... . .Cincinnati 

Doll, Aaron Dayton 

Doll, W. H St. Marys 

Doran, L. S Rushsylvania 

Dorfmeier, Jno. H Dayton 

Douce, C. W Caledonia 

Douds, Alvin H Canton 

Dougherty, L. E Greentown 

Douglass, C. F Kalida 

Douglass, Wm Kipton 

Dover, R. Fay Dayton 

Downar, J. R Cambridge 

Downing, A. J. . . . Hollansburgh 

Doyle, Samuel Winchester 

Drach, Geo. L Cleveland 

Drake, Wallace C Lodi 

Drackett, P. W Cleveland 

Dreher, Alfred Cleveland 

Dreher, L Cleveland 



172 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



0862 Duffield, W. H Germano 2188 

0106 Dugan, A. W White Cottage 1 188 

1 145 Dunham, L. £. .Mt. Washington 0991 

U46 Dunham, W.E..Mt. Washington 1827 

0683 Dunlap, G. G Unionport 1826 

0682 Dunlap, W. B Unionport 0417 

1223 Dunn, F. H Bainbridge 1 745 

1418 Dupler, Thos Gloucester 1161 

1048 Dustin, C. H Cleveland 1727 

0136 Dye, W. H Harrisonville 0059 

0642 Eady, Henry J Elyria 1089 

0831 Eakin, T. C .. Columbus Grove 0569 

1815 Earhart, A. C Locust Ridge 1302 

1734 Earhart, Cliffoid Franklin 1279 

1733 Earhart, M. W Franklin 1083 

0518 Eaton, H Barnesville I797 

0522 Eddmon, A Tontogany 0239 

0370 Eger, George Cincinnati 0238 

c»23 Eggleston, J. V. .New Plymouth 181 1 

1873 Egner, F. Cincinnati 1812 

1491 Eichberg, Julius H .. Cincinnati 0104 

1503 Eisenhour, Chas. L. . .Massillon 1372 

1553 Eisenhour, W. A.. Oak Harbor 1394 

1714 Elder, J. J Bremen 1718 

0652 Eldrick, J. D Greenfield 2032 

081 1 Elflein, Wm. F Cleveland 2524 

1872 Elfers, Joseph C. . . .Cincinnati I955 

0866 Ellis, James Harveysburg 0381 

0981 Ellison, O Ironton 1156 

0344 Ellsworth, C. S Brecksville 0665 

1419 Elser, P. C Dupont 1987 

2183 Elwell, W. H. C. Rural Dale 0357 

2184 Elwell, T. V Rural Dale 0352 

0124 Elwood, Clark Leesburg 1969 

0604 Ely, J. S Barnesville 1409 

1466 Emanuel, Emma C . . . . Antwerp 1 147 

1 132 Emrick, D. L Greenville 1278 

1341 Emrich, J. H Sandusky 0377 

0684 Emery, G. A Rendville 2105 

0643 England, W. L Jewett 2139 

01 19 Englebry, F. E Vermillion 0462 

0537 Ensign, Chas. A. . . Youngstown 0500 

0538 Ensign, Ellis Youngstown 0931 

1 158 Eppelin, Chas Pomeroy 2 142 

oi8s Ernest D Mechanicsburg 0214 

1368 Erwin, James Jay Hazelton 0854 

2533 Esch, C. A Cleveland 0168 

2002 Espach, J. Geo Cincinnati 0090 

2069 Espy, J. A Youngstown 1820 

0548 Eshelman, L. J Fostoria 0006 

1543 Estep, J. H New Athens 0761 

0337 Eubank, Thomas Celina 0472 

0856 Evans, E. H Cleveland 0974 

0850 Evans, E. M Palmyra loio 

0879 Evans, George Dublin 1 1 1 5 



Evans, Jason S Cincinnati 

Evans, J. W Delphos 

Evans, Jas. P Bradner 

Kvans, L. C Dayton 

Evans, Owen Dayton 

Evans, S. B Circleville 

Eveland, Geo. H . . . . Miamiville 

Ewing, G. A Jackson 

Ewing, John .... McConnellsville 

Eyman, Lou. E Groveport 

Eyman, H. C Groveport 

Eysenbach, H. P Delphos^ 

Fabing, J Cincinnati 

Fallon, J. M Cincinnati 

Fannon, S. J Bowersville 

Farqubar, G. S Glenford 

Farquhar, John Bucyrus 

Farquhar, Wm Bucyrus 

Fasig, A. M West Cairo 

Fasig, C. S Beaver Dam 

Fauley, C. B Fultonham 

Faulkner, L. W St. Paris 

Federspiel, Philip St. Marys 

Fee, F. M Bethel 

Feemster, William . . . Cincinnati 

Feil, Joseph Cleveland 

Feil, Sidney R Cleveland 

Fell, A. R Burgh Hill 

Fella, J. B Toledo 

Felt, F. D Wellington 

Fenimore, J. E. . . .Fremont City 

Fennel, C. T. P Cincinnati 

Fenner, J. C Shiloh 

Fenton, C. F Cleveland 

Ferguson, C. W Roscoe 

Fickardt, Geo. H Circleville 

Fieber, G. A Cincinnati 

Field, J. W MarysviUe 

Field, W. C Cleveland 

Fife, W. J Melrose 

Finfrock, M. B Mansfield 

Finney, Drayton J Niles 

Finney, Geo. W Dennison 

Fisler, Arthur Burbank 

Fisler, I Urbana 

Fisher, Emil A Cleveland 

Fisher, George Portsmouth 

Fisher, J. V Morristown 

Fisher, M. A Miamisburg 

Fitzpatrick, S. J Fayetteville 

Flandermeyer. H. D. .Cleveland 
Flandermeyer, H. H .. Cleveland 

Flavien, Wm Paulding 

Fleck, J. J Tiffin 

Fleming, A. H . . . East Liverpool 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



173 



1633 Fleming, E. C. Xenia 1575 

1 801 Flickinger, Geo. W. .Mogadore 2567 

0444 Flood, W. H Cleveland 0786 

1031 Frnncis, H. S Uhricsville 1396 

1 1 17 Francis, "W". J Uhricsville 1582 

1 1535 Francisco, Chas Dayton 0607 

0890 Franke, A Wapakoneta 0309 

0986 Franks, L. K Doylestown 1 196 

1461 Fratz, J. G Cincinnati 0724 

1573 Frazer, G. M Bellefontaine 0497 

1 187 Frazer, O. F Chagrin Falls oooi 

2106 Fredenburg, W. M.... Convoy 1002 

0330 Freehafer, J. B. .. .Port Clinton 0218 

2077 Freeman, Chas. E . . . . Columbus 0838 

2066 Freeman, Will W Columbus 1390 

0072 French, L. B Salem 0924 

0689 Frey, J. W Findlay 0839 

1688 Prey, S. D Findlay 2037 

2048 Foertmayer, A. W. .Cincinnati 1328 

0242 Fogle, G. T Alliance 1830 

2024 Foland, D. J Wilmington 1903 

0948 Folkeas, C. Otto Cleveland 0568 

0213 Folsom, C. B Youngstown 0024 

0285 Foltz, Mrs. M. J Montpelier 0656 

1612 Foncannon, C. W Toledo 1358 

1778 Foncannon, G. U., Liberty Centre 0507 

0041 Forbes, Robt Bedford 0954 

1 168 Ford, E. L Middlefield 1 143 

1525 Ford, Oscar Collins 0216 

1013 Ford, Wm Wakeman 1642 

1 65 1 Foreaker, John W.... Corning 0527 

2137 Forrest, James T Cleveland 0155 

1925 Forman, H. M Bradford 2135 

0070 Fortney, B Orwell 1228 

1407 Foster, A. M Steubenville 2128 

1701 Foutz, A. L.. . .West Lafayette 1135 

2064 Fovargue, F. P Genville 291 

0261 Foye, W. B Marion 0317 

2557 Frederich, J. F Toledo 1783 

0074 Friedland, J. F Coal ton 0281 

1280 Frihmelt, E. . . Cincinnati 256- 

0423 Fristoe, Ed. J Hebron 1 730 

1759 Fritcher, James Fostoria 0504 

1828 Frizell, J. S Dayton 0485 

1636 Fromme, Albert Cincinnati 1836 

0392 Frost, A. H Harrison 1509 

1330 Frost, F. H Lebanon 1406 

0730 Fuelling, L. D Wapakoneta 1679 

0201 Fuller, C. W Newark 0587 

1344 Fullerton, H. S Hillsboro 1492 

1771 Fuls, Otto Cincinnati 1832 

1068 Fulkerson, G. W Wynant 0137 

0236 Fulton, C Bucyrus 0597 

0237 Fulton, M. D Bucyrus 2507 

1576 Fulton, Robert Frankfort 2038 



Fulton, Thomas Frankfort 

Funk, F. M Toledo 

Funk, H. H Beverley 

Funk, M. F Mowrystown 

Furney, M. G Kenton 

Gackenheimer, L. F. .Van Wert 

Gaitree, W. B Cincinnati 

Galbreath, J. W Higginsport 

Galloway, Geo Xenia 

Gans, Wick C Youngstown 

Gardner, A. J Grand Rapids 

Gardner, J. M Oberlin 

Garlington,Conway, Cumberland 

Garrett, J. W Adamsville 

Garrison, Geo. M . . . . Rochester 

Garritt, J. M Huron 

Garver, Alex Navarre 

Garver, Philip A . . Strasburgh 
Garwood, D. H . . West Liberty 

Garwood, F. A Springfield 

Garwood, Spencer.. Milford Cent'r 

Gates, Anton Toledo 

Gates, Joseph Toledo 

Gatewood, W. E. .. .Stockport 

Gault, T. F New Concord 

Gault, W. P Westerville 

Gaylord, Henry C .... Cleveland 

Gazlay, John Clyde 

Gearheardt.T.J, Tippecanoe City 

Gee, F. E Ashtabula 

Gegelein, Fred L. .. .Cleveland 
Gehrung, John M. . . .Cleveland 

Geiger, John C Cleveland 

George, A. H Cleveland 

George, Robt. H Cleveland 

Gerstacker, M Cleveland 

Gest, Albion P Columbus 

Geyer, J. L Norwich 

Gibbons, Ed Painesville 

Gibson, F. W Amesville 

Gibson, Walter M. ..Portsmouth 

Gilbert, A. W Lima 

Gilbert, Daniel Vanlue 

Gilbert, H. A Lockland 

Gill, D. W West Liberty 

Gill, Geo Bloomingville 

Gillard, W. H Oxford 

Githens, E. W Bridgeport 

Given, J. M Chandlersville 

Gleick, Wm. M Cincinnati 

Gleim, J.C Cleveland 

Glenn, A. H Sardinia 

Glines, Geo. W Cleveland 

Godfrey, C. P Fostoria 

Goetze, H. J Lockland 



174 



OmO STATE PHABMACEX7TICAL ASSOCIATION. 



2152 Goetze, Wm. F Lockland 0263 

1958 Godman, C. A Cleveland 0521 

21 18 Goheen, C. E Hepburn 

2505 Goldbach, John Toledo 0901 

2079 Good, J. C Cleveland 1992 

1915 Good, J. F. . . .New Hampshire 0709 

0503 Goodbread, J. N Nevada 0708 

0502 Goodbread, W. F Nevada 1389 

0359 Goodman, Emanuel. ..Cincinnati 1481 
17 17 Gordon, T. V.... Junction City 2094 

2041 Goss, Alfred R Edinburgh 1195 

2040 Goss, Ambrose S. . . .Edinburgh 0187 

2042 Goss, Nathan K Edinburgh 1247 

1581 GoulJ, D. T Berea 1563 

1318 Grieme, F Cincinnati 0909 

1051 Griffith, A Millers 1087 

1050 Griffith, G. W Millers 1088 

0144 Grimes, G. G Bairdstown i860 

0027 Grimes, H. M Ostrander 1994 

1 1 72 Griswold, Edgar W . . Cleveland mo 

091 1 Graef, Paul Fletcher 1405 

2177 Graham, J. W... Prairie Depot 0150 

1520 Graham, Allan. Jr. ...Ottawa 1661 

0679 Graham, Clar. V Zanesville 0015 

1607 Graham, G. A Lebanon 0778 

^795 Graham, Miller Avondale 1186 

0678 Graham, W. A Sandusky 0738 

0694 Grand Gerard, G. F. .Circleville 0979 

0208 Grasser, Geo. D Newark 0232 

0626 Graves, P. A Hartford 0336 

1817 Green, E. E New Paris 0899 

0406 Greene, Harry E . . . . Portsmouth 0898 

0994 Green, Harry M....Mt. Vernon 0549 

0993 Green, Israel Mt. Vernon 2078 

1084 Green, John T . . Mechanicstown 1691 

0576 Greenamyer, E...East Palestine 0888 

0654 Greer, Henry Mt. Blancbard 0889 

0426 Greiner, C. F Luckey 2107 

0864 Grether, John Akron 1997 

1 1 18 Greve, C M Cincinnati 0492 

0358 Greve.T. L. A Cincinnati 0379 

0360 Greyer, Julius Cincinnati 0690 

1307 Groenland, Robt Cincinnati 0049 

0955 Groenland, Otto Cincinnati 0937 

1 134 Grosse, W. F Cleveland 0699 

0842 Grossklaus, Jonn F Navarre 0895 

2027 Grossman, Fred. A Cleves 1784 

0440 Grove, Frank B Mansfield 1281 

1839 Grubbs, A. L. Sabipa 0861 

0125 Grund, Henry C Fremont 0087 

1034 Gutilius, T. F Thornville 1239 

0257 Guthrie, D. P., Jr Belpre 0753 

0298 Guthrie, D. S Hillsborough 0969 

0046 Guthrie, J. H Conneaut 0525 

1813 Guthrie, J. W., Sr.. . .Aberdeen 2549 



Gwinner, Arnold F Dayton 

Gysel Robert Toledo 

Glandt, W Cincinnati 

Haag, Geo. D Cleveland 

Haber, Louis A. Cleveland 

Hackedorn, H. G Galion 

Hackedorn, M. L .Galion 

Hageman, J.F. S . . New Madison 

Hagerman, S. A Dunkirk 

Hahne, John A Dayton 

Haight, A. P . . Remson's Comers 

Hair, T. G Alliance 

Halboth, J. A Pemberton 

Hale, F. P Bellevue 

Hale, W. F. . . , Jackson 

Hall, J. M Greenville 

Hall, J. W Greenville 

Hall, R. C Lewis Center 

Hall, Wiimot J Cincinnati 

Hamel, Henry Genoa 

Hamill, Jason Clarksville 

Hamilton, M, N New Lisbon 

Hamilton, Thos. T. . . . Wellsville 

Hamilton, Wm. M Wellsville 

Hamlin, R, E Toledo 

Hammer, O. S Lynchburgh 

Hammer, W. P Westboro 

Haner, A Plain City 

Hanes, John H . . . . Harrisburgh 
Hannah, W. H . . . . Georgetown 

Ha[^ood, Adeline Warren 

Hapgood, Wm Warren 

Harbaugh, Levi Fostoria 

Harbison, W. F. . . . Spencerville 

Hardy, A. S Unionville 

Hardy, W. A., Sr Lebanon 

Hardy, W. A., Jr Lebanon 

Hare, Abraham Bellville 

Harley, J. P Ashland 

Harley, John P Lima 

Harmar, L. T Pennsville 

Harmon, J. F Oberlin 

Harmon, M. M Columbus 

Harper, C. B Leetonia 

Harpster, David Toledo 

Harpster, W. R Genoa 

Harrington, F Logan 

Harrison, J. M Cincinnati 

Harrod, T. N Bellecenter 

Harshberger, A. L. .Tippecanoe 
Hart, George W. . . West Milton 

Hart, W. T . . . , Cleveland 

Harter, H. G Helena 

Harter, Martin Milan 

Harter, Otio M Milan 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



175 



0763 Hartinger, W. M . . . . Middleport 21 51 

0885 Hartman, A. H. Galion 1 142 

1870 Hatton, Chas. F Zanesville 12 13 

2517 Hatton, Edgar M Zanesville 0765 

1869 Hatton, Elmore W. . . .Zanesville 1 190 

0054 Hauck, A. L Ottawa 1032 

0035 Hauck, Thos. .Columbus Grove 0053 

0135 Hauenstein, A Bluffton 1423 

0825 Hauser, J. C Sandusky 0586 

1093 Hauser, Martha Ripley 2180 

0758 Haus, John St. Marys 17 10 

0264 Haven, W. H Findlay 0691 

0077 Hawkins, M. J. .... .Brunswick 0877 

0045 Hawkins, M. S Salem 0048 

1282 Hawkins, R. L Cincinnati 0667 

0702 Hawley, A. K .Jefferson 2519 

1016 Hawthorn, D. M. .. .Cambridge 1493 

0456 Hayden, Mary E. .. .Cincinnati 1025 

1024 Hayes, O. P. .. .Mantua Station * 1242 

cx>32 Haynes, J. F Ironton 1424 

2136 Hays, Chas Fostoria 0191 

1 151 Hay ward, J. L Gallipolis i960 

0436 Hearson, R. T Attica 2054 

1809 Heath, F. T Cuyahoga 0616 

18 10 Heath, F. S. .. .Cuyahoga Falls 0465 

0076 Heath, F. M White House 1746 

i8o8 Heath, T. F. .. .Cuyahoga Falls 0362 

1547 Hebenthal, L. W. ...Paujding 0315 

0204 Hebner, A Dayton 2509 

0453 Hechler, G. L Cleveland 05 34 

1623 Hedges, Pearl J Piqua 1 126 

0532 Heffelman, W. M . . . -Cleveland 2021 

0570 Heffley, J... Canal Winchester 1054 

1805 Hefling, D Gilmore 0781 

0363 Heinemann, Arthur. . .Cincinntai 1602 

0934 Hememann, Otto ...Cincinnati 0470 

2057 Heister, J. P Cincinnati 1973 

0153 Heitzman, A Toledo 0123 

1421 Heifer, C. E Akron 1193 

2148 Heller, L. S New Haven 0816 

0935 Helman, C. M. .. .Madison ville 0918 
^993 Helmick,S. C. .CommercM Point 1254 

0294 Henderson, C. B Athens 1968 

2068 Hendess, Frank Brooklyn 1967 

0058 Henry, John K Basil 2092 

1 105 Henry, Wm. A New Vienna 0703 

3566 Herbst, Ed Columbus 0704 

1932 Herbst, Fred. W Columbus 0535 

2164 Herring, Wm St, Johns 1585 

0427 Heun, Emil Elmwood 0192 

0438 Hickman, W. G Nelsonville 0396 

1644 Hickok, H. M Ashtabula 1534 

0809 Hiester, C. W Massillon 0246 

^357 Higgins, C. O Painesville 1519 

1356 Higgins, G. H Painesville 0047 



Higley, W. C Coolville 

Hildaboldt, C. W. .Germantown 

Hildreih. N. G Cheviot 

Hill, C. E Richwood 

Hill, F. P Van Wert 

Hill, L. K Senecaville 

Hill, J. L Waverly 

Hill, M. S East Liverpool 

Hill. Waiter Swanton 

Hill, Wm Uhrichsville 

Hill, W. A Oakwood 

Hilles, Geo. E Barnesville 

Hinder, J. W Marion 

Hines, J. A .Van Wert 

Hippie, J. H Andover 

Hittler, J. A Columbus 

Hoberg, Herman H . . Cincinnati 

Hoberman, H. C Marion 

Hobensack, J.D. .Martin's Ferry 
Hodson, J. I , . . East Liverpool 

Hodson, M. T Pioneer 

Hoehn, John Cleveland 

Hoeveler, Joseph Cincinnati 

Hoffman, John .Toledo 

Hoffman, |. L New Bremen 

Hoffman, Otto L. . . .Columbus 

Hofiing, A. J Cincinnati 

Hoge, J. B St. Clairsville 

Hoglan, Phil . . . Newcomerstown 

Hohly, Charles Toledo 

Hoisington, F . . North Lewisburg 

Holcomb, H. C Pierpont 

Holden, C. E Mineral Point 

Holland, E. F Basil 

HoUenback, E. F Cincinnati 

Hollenbeck, M. W. . .Cincinnati 

HoUister, D. W Wauseon 

Holman, Harry N. . . .Columbus 

Holman, J. H Sciotoville 

Holmes, C E Toledo 

Holmes, W. W Columbus 

Holtz J. M Fairview 

Honecker, Abr .Cleveland 

Honecker, Jacob J. . .Cleveland 

Hooker, R. J Roscoe 

Hoopes, M Minerva 

Hoopes, Wm. ^W Minerva 

Hoover E. C Dayton 

Hoover, James Goatis P. O. 

Hoover, John Grove City 

Hoover, R. C Osborn 

Hoover, Z. T Dayton 

Hopkins, Wm. H . . Lynchburgh 

Hopp, Lewis C Cleveland 

Homung, John Dresden 



176 



OHIO STATS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, 



0598 Horst, J. H Cleveland 1991 

0636 Hosack, C Fredericktown 1635 

0788 Hosack, H. E Shelby 0866 

1266 Hostetter, S. A Ansonia 0700 

1265 Hostetter, T. J Ansonia 1536 

1070 Horn, Allen T Lewisburg 1537 

0983 Hosier, Geo. R Shauks 1 167 

0664 Houghton, J. W. . . .Wellington 0701 

0361 Hovekamp, J no. J . . . .Cincinnati 1 144 

1038 Hovey, A. D Chardon 1680 

1613 Howell, J. B McComb 0467 

2061 Howell, J. G Freeport 2085 

0099 Howson, Walter H. .Chillicothe 1521 

1934 Hoyt, Harry H. .North Fairfield 0161 

0450 Hubbaid, E. B Tiffin 0878 

1205 Hubbell, C. L Monclova 1846 

2104 Huber, H Ottawa 1387 

1060 Huber, J. M Findlay 0595 

1878 Huber, Sam 'I Findlay 1433 

1571 Huffman, Marion Bellaire .0174 

0712 Hugg, P . . . .Middleport 1670 

1 1 16 Huggins, T. A Chesterville 0479 

2119 Hughes, W. K. . . .Berlin Centre 0235 

0840 Hughey, B Frankfort 0234 

2125 Hughey, W. F Yellowbud 2099 

1 133 Hulbert, E. A Zaleski 1222 

1616 Hull, H. M Cleveland 0283 

1597 Hull, W. T Millersburgh 1244 

2178 Hulls, D. W Rockbridge 1221 

1408 Hulse, A Centreburgh 0459 

3561 Humiston, L. P Cleveland 0375 

1721 Hummel, H. L Baltimore 1151 

0944 Humphrey, D. J Napoleon 0695 

0493 Humphrey,W.H,Yr How Springs 1429 

2145 Hunter, F. C Wapokoneta oi66 

1724 Husman, Mar»in Cleveland 1485 

0939 Hussey, J. M New Vienna 1445 

0563 Huston, Chas Columbus 1743 

0457 Huston, J. C. . . .College Comer 1905 

1322 Huston, T. B Toledo 1906 

1402 Hutchison, A. J Cambridge 0540 

1403 Hutchison, J. C Cambridge 0751 

0685 Hutt, Peru Waverly 1790 

1019 Hyers, W. H Dayton 0893 

1677 Ingalls, M. W LaGrange 1284 

1 184 Ingersoll,C.H. North Ridgeviile 0259 

0495 Inman, Chas. T Akron 1709 

0494 Inman, Sidney C Akron 1603 

0726 Ink, Chas. E Columbiana 0975 

0551 Ink, H. H Leetonia 2536 

1716 Irwin, Chas. L Mansfield 1309 

1685 Irwin, Chas. H .... Martinsville 2170 

2016 Is^aacs, Benj. S Dayton 1047 

1910 Jackman, Winfield KnoxviJle 0941 

1913 Jacks, L. W Mentor 1786 



Jackson, Geo. W..Mt. Healthy 

Jacobi, Albert Fairmount 

James Ellis Harveysburgh 

Janny, J. E Waynesville 

Jeffrey, D. G Tiro 

Jeffrey, F. M Tiro 

Jenner, A. B Jenera 

Jewell, M. T Youngstown 

Jewitt, W. A £x)raiR 

Johns, W. A. . . Newcomerstown 

{ohnson, Chas. B . . Middletown 
ohnson, C. S Carthage 

Johnson, Eugene Piqua 

Johnson, Geo Grafton 

Johnson, Chas. S . . New Concord 
Johnson, James A. . .Springboro 
Johnson, Joseph. . . . .Sarahsville 

Johnson, J. L Parkman 

Johnson, j. M Steubenville 

Johnson, J. R Zanesville 

Johnson, J. T Milnersville 

Johnson, Thos Steubenville 

Johnston, Frank T Bucyrus 

Johnston, R, T Bucyrus 

Johnston, S. T Cold water 

Jones, A. S Bainbridge 

Jones, C Saint Paris 

Jones, David. Columbus 

Jones, Homer E Frankfort 

Jones, J. H Pomeroy 

Jones, M. B *Venedocia 

Jones, Thos. W., Jr Oak Hill 

Jones, W. D Newark 

Jones, W. J Smithfield 

Joyner, W. T Delaware 

Judkins, T. C Bridgeport 

Jump, James S Kansas 

Justice, C. R Poland 

Justice, Joseph Gilboa 

Justice, T. P Ottawa 

Kaeffer, Charles J. . . .Cincinnati 
Kaestlen, Samuel E.. Cleveland 
Kallmeyer, F. G. .. .Cincinnati 

Kaiter, Geo. W Dayton 

Kampfmueller, C Cincinnati 

Kapper, Martin Canton 

Karb, George J Columbus 

Kan man, Wm Cincinnati 

Kauffman, D. E Payne 

Kauffman, Geo. B Columbus 

Kautz, A. F Cincinnati 

Kautzleben, H Dayton 

Kayser, Wm Wapakoneta 

Kearns, F. M Bridgeport 

Keepers, G. A Beallsville 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



177 



1792 Kee$han, E. A Cincinnati 2033 

1308 Keeshan, John.. Cincinnati 1462 

2047 Keeshan, M. F Cincinnati 0364 

0870 Keiper, Franz Cleveland 0354 

0871 Keiper, Louis Cleveland 0228 

0127 Kelch, J. R Tarlton 1665 

0083 Keller, Charles Reading 1666 

1136 Keller, M Dayton 1888 

1587 Kellison, W. H Quincy 1326 

1 1 75 Kelly, C. £ Caledonia 1234 

0003 Kelly, W. T Frankfort 1391 

005 J Kelly, W. W Ottawa 1959 

1980 Kemp, D. G Ada 1 1 12 

0583 Keenan, G.W.. Upper Sandusky 0300 

0623 Kennedy, C. W.. . .Deavertown 1667 

0348 Kennedy, Francis. ...... .Bryan 1463 

0959 Kennedy, S. F Felicity 14 18 

0468 Kerr, Chas. D Gallipolis 1364 

0319 Kerr, Frank P Huntsville 0107 

0822 Kerans, G. R Cuba 0461 

0735 Kerns, J. L Quincy 1722 

1927 Keuler, P. L Rochester 2039 

1 283 Kiehl, Wm Ci ncinnati 1 526 

0454 KiefFer, George Cleveland 1527 

2543 Kienzle, Frank Columbus 0599 

0452 King, Chas. E Cincinnati 1460 

1220 King, C. F Arlington 0355 

0189 K.ing, M. V. B Canfield 0957 

2156 Kingham, Joseph. .Rocky Ridge 0851 

1646 Kinsey, Joseph. .. .Pleasant Hill 1375 

1494 Kinzbach, F Cincinnati 1472 

1754 Kiplinger, J. W. . . .West Salem 1782 

1558 Kipp, Conrad Greenville 1303 

1 1 82 Kipp, Wm Greenville 1436 

0324 Kirchhofer, P. Paul . . . Massillon 1073 

2530 Kirchmaier, G. A Toledo 1752 

1883 Kirchmaier, Hugo C. .. .Toledo 1951 

1882 Kirchmaier, Wm Toledo 1952 

0547 Kirkpatrick, J. A. ... . .Flushing 1700 

1715 Kirkpatrick, W. P Utica 1488 

0791 Kirschner, Jos. N Toledo 0096 

1 1 13 Kistler, D. S Palmyra 0404 

1762 Kiaphacke, Jno. H .. Cincinnati 0615 

0365 Klayer, Chas. F Cincinnati 1464 

1791 Klayer, Louis Cincinnati 1098 

0464 Klein, David Madjsonville 2087 

1017 Klein, C Madisonville 1859 

0980 Klussman, F. J Ellistou 1233 

1918 Knapp, Mrs. Delia A. .Kilbourne 0524 

1643 Knapp, G. LeRoy. .. .Ashtabula 11 70 

1979 Knapp, John. ...... .Cleveland 1588 

1963 Knopf, H. C Akron 2015 

1329 Knowles, F. W Felicity 0906 

0163 Koons, C. W Canton 1921 

1541 Koch, Herman Cincinnati 0800 



Kochenderfer, Jno. A . . Rendville 

Koehler, R. H Cincinnati 

Koehnken Herman H. Cincinnati 

Koenig, John H Cincinnati 

Kolb, Adolph. Columbus 

Kraps, J. F Dexter 

Kraps, John W Dexter 

Krauer, E. D Pickerington 

Krauter, C. H Youngstown 

Krebs, Chas Cleveland 

Krebs, R. J Westminster 

Krebs, Wm Cleveland 

Krebsz, Hermann Cleveland 

Krehbiel, A. J Dayton 

Kremer, Julius A Columbus 

Krieger, J. C Cincinnati 

Krimmel, John L. . . .Circleville 

Krumm, John M Toledo 

Kuester, L. C Zanesville 

Kuhlmeier, Henry. .. .Cleveland 

Kumler, J. A Baltimore 

Kunkle, David C Dayton 

Kusnick, Francis Riverside 

Kusnick, Leopold Versailles 

Kutchbauch, J. F Dayton 

Kybitz, Louis Cincinnati 

Kylius, Geo. W Cincinnati 

Lace, J. H Cleveland 

Laffer, J. M Akron 

Lake, J. H Tiffin 

Lake, V. W Eaton 

Lamb, J. W. . . . . . Milledgeville 

Lammert, C.J Cincinnati 

Landers, Geo. W Cincinnati 

Landon, L. E Kirby 

Lane, A. L Monroeville 

Lane, L. B Cleveland 

Lane, E. R Cleveland 

Lange, F. R .... Sandusky City 

Lan^enbeck, A Cincinnati 

Lansing, R. H Chillicothe 

Lash, E. R Athens 

Laltimer, E. G Hilliard 

Latimer, Ira N. . . . East Liverpool 

Latimer, J. W Rock Creek 

Latimer, O. B Rock Creek 

Latimer, V. D Kock Creek 

Latin, Geo Dayton 

Laubach, Geo. R Wooster 

Lauer, J. D Conover 

Laughlin, R Steubenville 

Lautenschlager, Geo. CD ay ton 

Laver, P. J Mansfield 

Law, H. B Deersville 

Lawson, David Warsaw 



178 



OmO STATX PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



0801 Lawson, David J Warsaw 1385 

0245 Lazier, W. D Xenia 1229 

1978 Leas, William West Sonora 0651 

1 102 Leobold, John F Attica 1091 

2502 Ledman, O. S Columbus 1035 

1618 Lee, A. A Painesville 0327 

0394 Lee, £. B Garrettsville 2134 

0997 Lee, £. S Coshocton 1854 

1617 Lee, N. O Painesville 0132 

0996 Lee, S. H Coshocton 0062 

1998 Lee, W. G Painesville 1192 

0409 LeFever, H. J Eldorado 2014 

0776 Legg, George W Latham 1645 

0933 Lehmkuhl, J. B Hamilton 0084 

021 1 Lehr, Philip Cleveland 1388 

2185 Lehrer, Chas. A Suidusky 1890 

1865 Leist, Isa Napoleon 1053 

2513 Leman, M Cincinnati 1891 

0419 Lentz, C. F Columbus 0124 

0828 Leonard, A. W Kinsman 193 1 

1 140 Lerch, J Amanda 2169 

2100 Leslie, B. F Convoy 0178 

0243 Lewis, A. C Bucyrus 061 1 

0308 Lewis, A. L. ..Hamden Junction 0321 

0498 Lewis, B. G Girard 1 127 

1420 Lewis, £. D Jackson 0229 

0159 Lewis, £. N Defiance 0207 

1 137 Lickes, R. P Steubenville 2165 

1941 Light, G. A.. Columbus Grove 0510 

1 107 Lincoln, J. C . . . . Bowling Green 0550 

0485 Linden, H. F Cleveland 1936 

2545 Linden, W. £ Cleveland 1749 

0857 Lindsley, D. C Cleveland 1974 

0179 Lindsey, £. D., Jr. . . Mansfield 0031 

0180 Lindsey, £. H Mansfield 0863 

1200 Lingan, £. C Dennison 0775 

1796 Lingan, John R Columbus 0288 

1310 Linnemann, J. H .... Cincinnati 0190 

1008 Linvill, A. H New Salem 11 55 

0353 Lippert, Otto C. F Loveland 0985 

0407 Lippert, H. G Loveland 2528 

0173 Lisle, J. D., Springfield 1094 

0018 Little, J. Boyer .. Fredericksburg 1549 

1924 Little, J. M Bradford 0622 

0272 Littler, J. W.. North Robinson 1789 

2508 Lloyd, J. U .Cincinnati 0742 

0471 Lloyd, N. A Cincinnati 1866 

0886 Lockard, J Canton 1348 

0481 Lohman, O. F Cleveland 0660 

0841 Long, W. A Steubenville 148^ 

2149 Long, L. W New Haven 0578 

0378 Longbrake, D. W . . Logansville 0579 

I loi Longshore, S. D . . . . New Lisbon 0339 

1255 Loomis, N. P Olmsted 1917 

1495 Lorentz, J. N Cincinnati 0161 



Lorey, C. N CiicleviUe 

Lotze, George Girard 

lA>tze, Louis L Girard 

Lotttzenheiser, J D.NewPhila'phia 

Love, J. C Moscow 

Lowry, A. J Leipsic 

Lowry, O* F Lore City 

Lucas, J. H^ Proctorsville 

Luckey,G. W. . South Charleston 

Ludlow, Charles Springfield 

Ludlum, S. D Middletown 

Luebkert, Hugo Cincinnati 

Lyle, G. W ...Scio 

Lynde, I. P Kensington 

Lyone, T. J Brown 

Lynn, E. D Canfield 

Lynn, G. A Akron 

Lynn, Geo. F Canfield 

Lyons, Geo Milford Centre 

Lyon, L Conneaut 

LyUe, T. M West Milton 

McAnnally, Horace W. . .Troy 

McBean, J. S Cadiz 

McBride, C. F Youngstown 

McCall, A. F Bethel 

McCarter, E. N Columbus 

McCarty, H. C Zanesville 

McCaskey» C. B Cincinnati 

McClain, Hugh Letart Falls 

McClain, M. H Gallon 

McClellan, A New London 

McClintick, S Mt. Sterling 

McClelUn, W. M Ashland 

McCloud, R. C PUin City 

McCloud, S. N Marysville 

McCallough, T. T Somerton 

McConnell, Dell . Green Spring 
McConney, W. T. . . . . . Atwater 

McCormick, J. T Xenia 

McCormick, Chas^ . . Doylestown 

McCoy, Frank ^Cleveland 

McCoy, H. F Chauncy 

McCoy, J. N Kenton 

McCuen, L. A. . .. Independence 

McCuUough, A. H Mansfield 

McColloch, C. R Fremont 

McCuUough, Wm . . New Athens 

McCuUoch, R. S Fremont 

McDona]d,S. S .. New Lexington 

McDonnel, A Antwerp 

McDowell, O. H Medina 

McDowell, R. M Medina 

McEwen, T. R Youngstown 

McFadden, H . . Magnetic Springs 
McGarraugh, T. S. . . .Greenfield 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



179 



1 367 McGaughey, J. H Hubbard 1 5 18 

0575 McGill, W. W Salineville 2012 

0506 McGonagle, A. B Brijliant 1837 

2059 McGonagh, Robert. ..Salineville 2540 

0413 Mcllvaine, J. J Cleveland 131 1 

2116 Mcintosh, J. N Irondale 1471 

1868 MacKenzie, A. G Wellsville 05 11 

1614 MacKenzie, C. S. ...Cleveland 1470 

0484 McKeown, S. W Youngstown 0638 

0483 McKcown, W.W.. Youngstown 0637 

1785 McKinley, J Uhrichsville 1761 

1064 McKinley, J. M Ada 0773 

1560 McLean, Alexander. .. .Augusta 1027 
1274 McLain, J. H Urbana 0772 

1561 McLean, Will T AugusU 1652 

2088 McLeod, A. L... Central College 1862 

2065 McLeod, J. R. . . Benton Ridge 0252 

0920 McMillcn, W Greenwich 0953 

1374 McMullen,Gco. W Toledo 0649 

0517 McNaughton, M.W. .Coshocton 1793 

1248 Maddox, G. E Newtonville 0142 

0241 Maddox, Wm Ripley 0892 

0240 Maddox, W. E Ripley 0891 

1631 Magruder, J. J Somerset 2559 

1 169 MahafFey, J. W Byhalia 1246 

2000 Manville, A. J. .. Bowling Green 1434 

1877 Markle, J. B Findlay 1028 

0617 Markley, L Georgetown 1062 

2153 Marmon, J. Y Lima 0829 

1 68 1 Market, C Hamilton 2532 

1342 Marquardt, Jacob F Tiffin 0908 

0210 Marquis J. S New Lisbon 1834 

0183 Martin, Alexander. .. .Hannibal 1376 

0016 Martin, J. D... .Reynoldsburgh 0103 

1489 Martin, W. J Cincinnati 0545 

1 365 Martindell, F Hamilton 1 324 

1 477 Marriott, E, L Dupont 1 323 

1935 Marshall, Hugh St. Martin 0200 

0706 M arshall, H . 6 Brookville 1 4 1 5 

2124 Marshall, Samuel B....Agosta 0384 

1874 Marty, Louis K Cincinnati 0546 

1699 Marvin, J. P Harrison 0289 

0129 Mason, Chas. C Buchtel 0907 

2096 Mason, David, Jr Oregonia 1807 

0715 Mason, G. W Stafford 1251 

0714 Mason, J. L Stafford 0722 

0990 Mason, M. P Mansfield 1578 

0619 Masters, C. W Bryan 0859 

1 719 Matthews, Mrs.G.L. .New Toledo 0523 

0603 Mattison, T. C Berea 1674 

1 50 1 Mauer, Jacob, L Belivar 1831 

1949 May, Arthur F Cleveland 0478 

1990 May, Chas. H .'.Piqua 2138 

0618 May, Daniel Poland 0846 

0165 May, J. M3rson Kingston 0539 



Mayell, A Cleveland 

Mayer, John A Dayton 

Maxwell, Geo. F. .West Liberty 
Meggenhofen, C. W.. .Columbus 

Meiminger, A Cincinnati 

Melsheimer, C. A. . . . Van Wert 

Melsheimer, E. J Shelby 

Melsheimer, W. W..Van Wert 

Melville, C. R Sandusky 

Melville, Wm. M Lima 

Menninger, J- G Cincinnati 

Mercer, A. B Corning 

Mercer, C . B . . . Cuyahoga Falls 
Mercer, C. L. V. . . .Mt. Vernon 

Mercer, F. T Centerburgh 

Mercer, J. I Portsmouth 

Mercer, M. N Bellaire 

Metz, A. H East Liverpool 

Metz, John W Youngstown 

Meyer, Geo. E Cincinnati 

Meyer, H. C St. Clairsville 

Meyer, John Lima 

Meyer, William Piqua 

Meyer, Wm. V. . . . , . .Cleveland 

Michael, C Bellebrook 

Michael, J. F Palestine 

Milbourn, L Hanover 

Miller, C. M Stryker 

Miller, £. C New Carlisle 

Miller, E. O Toledo 

Miller, F. C.New Philadelphia 

Miller, F. J West Union 

Miller, G. W Jackson 

Miller, J . E Darbvville 

Miller, K. D Neville 

Miller, L. A isteubenville 

Miller, M. L Steubenville 

Miller, Orlando Newark 

Miller, P. B Gettysburg 

Miller, Rodney, West Farmington 

Miller, W Neville 

Miller, Wm. C Hamnton 

Miller, W. H. .New Philadelphia 

Miller, Thomas J Hopedale 

Milnor, W. L. Fayette 

Minton, J. E Sidney 

Mills, S. E Harbor 

Moffett, Wm .Arcadia 

Mohn, Carl F Cincinnati 

Montague, D. T Xenia 

Montanus, P. E Springfield 

Moon, D. H Blanchester 

Moon, L. P Wilmington 

Moon, O Spring Valley 

Mooney, M. L Cardington 



I So 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



0403 Moore, Alexander. . . LoDdonville 1 5 1 5 

0078 Moore, A. C Amelia 1473 

0621 Moore, C. A Cambridge 1 194 

1458 Moore, £. C Gann 0475 

21 13 Moore, G. H Leesville 1498 

0128 Moore, J. C West Mansfield 1755 

1824 Moore, W. H Bellevue 2510 

1362 Moore, W. H.... Wagon Works 0171 

0516 Morgan, C. R Quaker City 0170 

1058 Morgan, J. B. F.. . .Clarksburg 1412 

0808 Morganthaler, Philip. .Massillon 1806 

0803 Morris, Evan J Garrettsville 1676 

0968 Morris, Frank Harrod 1692 

0995 Morris, W. E New Holland 0102 

0961 Morrison, R. J Steubenville oioi 

0958 Morse, Geo. B Huron 0913 

0756 Morran, Henry. . . .North Toledo 1589 

0919 Mortland, J. C Edgerton I533 

0013 Moss, J. W. ...New Richmond 0705 

1928 Moss, W. F Maineville 0792 

2168 Mote, L. M West Mil ton 0728 

0395 Mott, F. F Garreltsville 2515 

1 191 Mounts, J. L , Morrow 2546 

0320 Mudge, W. D Weston 0602 

2025 Muehlberg, Edward . . Cincinnati 2097 

2026 Muehlberg, Wm Cincinnati 0860. 

1285 Mueller, C. H Cincinnati 2003 

1570 Mulford, John H Poplar 0489 

0671 Mund, J. F Cleveland 0488 

2122 Munn, H. E Colton 0698 

0697 Munson, A. W Forest 1 3 12 

0675 Munson, L. D Forest 0577 

0154 Murdock, A. W. . . . Bellefontaine 1768 

2123 Murdock, J. G Malvern 0721 

1731 Murphy, J. J Lima I577 

0720 Murphy, John T Jamestown 1524 

1781 Murphy, J. W Millidgeville 1544 

1095 Murphy, M. M Ripley 0515 

0284 Musselman, A Saint Paris 1545 

1435 Mutchmore, W. M. . . .Columbus 0989 

1467 Myers, A Hamilton 1648 

0528 Myers, F. M ...East Liverpool 1777 
0108 Myers, Geo. S Carey 0387 

0529 Myers, J. A.... East Liverpool 2120 

0903 Myers, K. N Fremont 1 177 

0248 Nace, ;M. T New Lisbon 0530 

1340 Nace, Warren, J Deshler 0079 

0347 Nachrieb, C. J Wauseon 0496 

1554 Nagle, Alfred J Oak Harbor 0812 

0950 Nagler, W. M Hopedale 2539 

1507 Naylor, S. T Canal Dover 0696 

1 210 Neale, E.; Lincoln. . . .Gallipolis 1286 

0830 Neff, B New Carlisle 1275 

1455 Negley, W. H ...Wyoming 0349 

0847 Nelson, J. W Springfield 0356 



Nesbit, James A Beigholz 

Neva,J. W Clevelajid 

Newcomer, J. S Wauseon 

Newcomb, N. O Cleveland 

Newcomer, M. F....PemberyiUe 
Newell, Thos. A. . .Bowerstown 
Newlove, Wm. J. . , .Columbus 
Newton, Anna D, New Straitsvlk 
Newton, G. A.. New Straitsville 
NicboU, E. H. . . .New Amherst 

Nichols, D. T Newark 

Nichols, Edwin Newark 

Nichols, £. S Canton 

Nichols, John Columbus 

Nichols, John M Columbus 

Nickerson, F. B ...Greenwich 

Nickerson, Orlo Litchfield 

Nickum, M. J. . . . Pleasantville 

Nihart. D. H Lima 

Nill, George C Toledo 

Nipgen, Frank M . . . . Cincinnati 

Nipgen, J. A Chillicothe 

Nipgen, J. B Dayton 

Noble, W. W. Berea 

Noe, A. J Moxahala 

Norman, A. H Edenton 

Norman, O. M Roseville 

Norris, E. G Cleveland 

Norris, E. P Cleveland 

Norton, H. E Ironton 

Norwood, Theo. F. . . .Cincinnati 

Nye, C. N. Canton 

Nye, Harry L Zanesville 

O'Brien. Wm Cleveland 

O'Connell, W. J . .Mingo Junction 

Odell, John Delta 

Ogden, C. W Port Jefferson 

Ogden, E. N Marietta 

Ogden, L, C Port Jefferson 

Ogier, J. M .Cambridge 

Ohl, Eli J Mineral Ridge 

Ohler, Jacob, Jr. .Liberty Center 

Oh linger, L. P ... Wooster 

Okey, F. G Caldwell 

Olmstead, F. E. . . .Millersburg 

Ong, A. R Martin's Ferry 

Ong, W. B New Town 

Openheimer, John Canton 

Opperman, E Cleveland 

lOrr, Samuel Columbus 

Osbom, R. L Prospect 

Otis, John C Cincinnati 

Ott, Ferdinand Cincinnati 

Otten,'Otto Ironton 

Overbeck, B. H., Jr. .Cincinnati 



OmO STATE PBABMACEUTXCAL ASSOCIATION. 



l8l 



0202 Overholser,S. H, West Manchester 

1653 Owen, Alfred Osceola 

2518 Owen, Gomar D London 

1446 Packer, A. J Ravenna 

1447 Packer, W. B Alliance 

0487 Page, H. M. - Bedford 

1096 Palmer, J. G Conneaut 

0274 Pape, Josephine Sandusky 

1287 Pardick, B. J Cincinnati 

0746 Park, W. H Elyria 

0644 Parker, A. G. S Siruthers 

2173 Parker, Isaac Chester Hill 

1457 Parker, Jas. D Bogart 

0782 Parker, Marcus C Cleveland 

0610 Parker, W. R Beverly 

01 18 Parks, W. H Nelsonville 

1657 Parrett, W. E Greenfield 

2074 Parsons, A Gann 

0731 Parsons, Geo. F Troy 

0946 Parsons, R Cleveland 

2174 Patrick, H. W Vermillion 

2084 Patrick, Malcom Nor walk 

0415 Patterson, J. A St. Clairsville 

0414 Patterson, J. J. . . .St. Clairsville 

1 1 78 Patterson, R. R Nelsonville 

0881 Potts, T. L. East Liverpool 

0780 Paul, F. M Basil 

0940 Payne, Chas. E. . . .Port Clinton 

1 33 1 Pearce, B. L. .West Farminglon 

0865 Pearce, J. O . . West Farmington 

Id 1 • Pearce, Leveret Mc Arthur 

21 12 Pease, M, G Mason 

2554 Peck, Erasmus D Toledo 

1953 Peck, J. H Cleveland 

0796 Peet, L. A Cleveland 

0797 Peet, L. L Cleveland 

0858 Peltz, J. P Olmsted 

0777 Penfield, J . N Elmore 

1842 Penfield, S. J Columbus 

0476 Perry, Charles F Cincinnati 

1659 Peters, E. J Akron 

0687 Peters, V. O . . .• Shelby 

0431 Petersilge, Albert Cleveland 

1901 Peterson, Harry G.. Williamsburg 

1 741 Pettit, B. S Hicksville 

1740 Pettit, E. M Hicksville 

0066 Payton, W. T Manchester 

0963 Pfunder, John Marshall ville 

0964 Pfunder, L. P Marshallvillc 

1548 Phelps, Lyman C Andover 

1802 Phenegar, B. H Columbus 

1804 Pheneger, J. W Columbus 

0627 Plants, T Crestline 

0351 Prame, F. J Shiloh 

1262 Pratt, E. S Geneva 



1353 

0875 

1354 
0156 

0340 

0366 

2046 

0620 

1496 

0193 
1829 
1401 

1875 
1204 
1041 
0867 
0868 

0713 
0657 

0945 
1 109 

0346 

1160 

0573 

.0514 

0278 

056^ 
0402 

1523 
0147 

0880 

0589 
0247 
1922 

0873 
1654 

1823 

0008 

1532 
0480 

1555 
1608 

0429 

0640 

0641 

2548 

1638 

2036 

20II 
I981 
0905 

"57 
1821 



Pretzinger, H Dayton 

Pretzinger, M Brookville 

Pretzinger, R Dayton 

Phillips, B. F.... North Jackson 

Phillips, C R Salem 

Phillips,C. W Cincinnati 

Phillips, E. D Cincinnati 

Phillips, F. P Marengo 

Phillips, William Beaver 

Pickett, John Guysville 

Piercy, C. G Wilshire 

Plumly, A Barnesville 

Plummer, Conrad Sabina 

Pohlmeyer, E. A Cincinnati 

Pond, Geo. W Olena 

Pond, W. F Warren 

Pope, James Clyde 

Pope, M. A. F Clyde 

Pope, R. W Woodsfield 

Posten, C. E Nelsonville 

Potter, E. J Sherwood 

Potts, J. C Belleville 

Price, A. Q Swanton 

Probeck. Geo. J Cleveland 

Pugh, Geo. C Toronto 

Pullin, A Barnesville 

Purdy, Thos. L Covington 

Putnam, R Gann 

Putt, A. H Canal Dover 

Putt, L. P Canton 

Pyle, F. T Madison 

Pyle, S. B Richmond 

Quinn, J. W Hillsboro 

Quinlin, W. H . . . . Larimie P. O. 

Rabe, H. H Clyde 

Raiff, J. K Millersburg 

Rainsberger, A. C . . SherrodsvUle 

Rarey, A. M Groveport 

Rarey, F. S Columbus 

Rathburn, J. C Gallipolis 

Rauchkolb, John Columbus 

Rave, Herman Qeveland 

Rawden, Lucien Windsor 

Rawles, Jos. P Lebanon 

Rea, D. F ZanesviUe 

Read, J. A Wauseon 

Read, M. E Wauseon 

Reahard, T. M Wihnington 

Reakirt, Chas. C. , Jr . . Cincinnati 

Reakirt, John W Cincinnati 

Ream, John C Dayton 

Ream, L. M . . Washington C. H. 

Ream,^0. B Somerset 

Reasoner, M. D Bellaire 

Reber, B. C Logan 



l82 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



1822 Reber, R. A Logan 0332 

Q448 Reed,C. D Pomeroy 1748 

0896 Reed, D Pomeroy 191 1 

0766 Reed, Enos Portsmouth 2551 

1270 Reed, G. P Ravenna 0093 

1377 Reed, I. N Toledo 1442 

1238 Reed, P. H .Hayesville 0844 

0042 Reed, P. R Agosta 1 179 

1546 Reed, W. M Agosta 0764 

0916 Reeder, W. W West Cairo 2091 

2541 Reeg, Adam Portsmouth 1 779 

0646 Rees, J. N South Charleston 1349 

2001 Reiber, A Pleasant Hill 0342 

6718 Reid, Henry Lebanon 1689 

0447 Reinert, Lewis Columbus 1981 

2130 Reinbart, W. H Polk 2189 

0020 Reisinger, L. K Galion 1594 

0271 Rempel, Ferdinand Logan 1593 

0369 Rendigs, Chas. P Cinaunati 1212 

0301 Resley, Lyman Gann 1345 

0177 Reul, W. W Delphos 0455 

1760 Reynolds, G. E Fostoria 21 10 

0719 Reynolds, J. A Addison 1744 

0723 Rhoades, E Solon 0910 

0938 Rhoads, W. L Ashland 1513 

0433 Rice, B. T Newton Falls 0915 

0542 Rice, Wm. L Columbus 0430 

1628 Richard, A. J Marietta 1225 

1838 Richards, J. W Columbus 1682 

0693 Richardson, S. M Metamora 1957 

0080 Richardson, W. S . . . . Clarington 0855 

0297 Richey, G. C Scio 1863 

0536 Richey, L. W New Paris 1258 

0121 Richey, S. C Oxford 1497 

0343 Richter, Sam'l F.. . . Philo, P. O. 1506 

0843 Rickseeker, David Navarre 0367 

1747 Riddle, W. H London 1574 

1751 Ridgley, W. F Steubenville 0410 

1 1 39 Ridgway, B. G Cedarville 1037 

1043 Ridgway, Chas.. Yellow Springs 212 1 

1044 Ridgway, C. M .. Yellow Springs 1151 

0519 Riley, E. D Paris 0533 

1379 Rissler, E. T..New Livingston 1288 

0265 Ritter, Louis F Columbus 0244 

2093 Roach, John T Morrow 1601 

01 16 Robb, Lucian B Cincinnati 0094 

0437 Roberts, John S Columbus 2182 

2175 Roberts, W. B. . .Columbus Grove 1203 

0262 Roberts, W. P Sunbury 1690 

2 1 61 Robinson, Alfred Arabia 1336 

1847 Robinson, J. C Mifflin 1332 

0219 Robinson, J. E Bellaire 0368 

1609 Robinson, John... Green Spring 1660 

0733 Robinson, John P BaUvia 0600 

0131 Robinson, P. H., Washington C.H 1469 



Robinson, W. W Bellaire 

Robison, E. J London 

Rockey, John Cbatfield 

Rock wood, C. H . . North Amherst 

Rodgers, N. P Kingston 

Roe, R. B Elyria 

Roedell, G. A Gallipolis 

Rodgers, Chas. .Bowling Green 

Rodgers, J. A Kenton 

Rodgers, J. H Louisville 

Rogers, T. C Wellston 

Roller, J. L Toledo 

Roller, U. D Minerva 

Roller, R. S Wooster 

Rood, M. N Mt. Cory 

Rose, D. E Adelphi 

Rosebraugh, A. W Newark 

Rosebraugh, J. B Newark 

Rose water, Nathan Cleveland 

Rosselott, H. F Buford 

Ross, J. D • • • • Wadsworth 

Roth, Frank M Norwalk 

Roudabush D Goshen 

Rouse, J. H Columbus 

Rouse, E. H Columbus 

Roush, A. H Syracuse 

Rowland, T. H Obcrlin 

Rudasill, C . H . . . . Rusbsylvania 

Ruder, E. G Hamilton 

Ruggles, R. R Cleveland 

Rulmann, R. A Minster 

Rumsbaugh, D. W. . . Greenwich 

Rumnell, James Wharton 

Rummel, J. H Lucas 

Rupp, John W Waterville 

Ruppert, John Cincinnati 

Rusk, Daniel Malta 

Russell, A. W . . North Bloomfield 

Russell, CM West Unity 

Russell, W. H Mt. Oreb 

Ruse ell, W. H Kingston 

Rust, B. S Cincinnati 

Rutenick, John Cinpinnati 

Ryan, W. J .... . .Junction City 

Rynard, N. B Kent 

Safford. E. R ChilHcothe 

Sager, N Herring 

Salisbury, T. N , . . . Russellville 

Salkeld, G. M Perry 

Saltsman, Wm. A . . . . Salineville 

Samsel, H. S Bloomville 

Sander, August Cincinnati 

Sander, John M Akron 

Sanders, C Metamora 

Sands, J. Waynesville 



OmO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATIOK. 



183 



1 572 Sanford, C. A , Middlefield 0473 

0707 Sanford, W. R Brookville 171 1 

1780 Sanns, James H Gallipolis 21 71 

1209 Saons, P, A Gallipolis 0588 

0304 Sargent, A. L Delta 1 104 

0917 Sargent, H. H Monroeville 2030 

0305 Sargent, M. S Delta 1080 

1 183 Sargent, S. C Piketon 2028 

0401 Satterly, H. B Orwell 2127 

0373 Sauer, Louis W Cincinnati 2126 

1982 Saunders, H. G Killbuck 0398 

0929 Saur, J. C Napoleon 1346 

0582 Savidge, G. A . . McClutchenville 0282 

1902 Sayre, Wm. M , Letart ocx); 

0203 Schaaff, J. H ....... . Gallipolis 2552 

1 1 19 Schaefer, August Cincinnati 1773 

1 141 Schaeffer, F. N . . . . Germantowh 0299 

1697 Schaffner, Chas. F Norwalk 1772 

0552 Schambs, Geo. M Cleveland 0960 

0445 Schellentrager, £. A . . Cleveland 1026 

1565 Schick, Adam New Berlin 1208 

0807 Schiller, G Petersburg 0258 

0806 Schiller, John H .... Petersburg 0310 

1335 Schilling, J. P Louisville 0624 

2503 Schindler, Chas Toledo 1966 

0794 Schindler, Joseph Toledo 0874 

1530 Schirm, James Pickerington 1735 

1327 Schmidt, Adam Springfield 0544 

1320 Schmidter, F. X Cincinnati 1539 

0460 Schmidt, Carl .. Brooklyn Village 0770 

1962 Schmidt, J. J . . Brooklyn Village 0887 

2179 Schneider, Mrs. £.. ..Minster 1592 

1 214 Schmetzler, John B. . . .Archbold 2058 

1995 Schroeder, Geo. A ...Cleveland 1923 

1232 Schoehut, Christie H .. Cleveland 1708 

0293 SchoU, Jacob, J Toledo 0002 

0292 Scholl, Joseph Toledo 1202 

0787 Schooly, A Somerton 0063 

0323 Schuckers, J. M. Massillon 1049 

0050 Schueller, Aug. W. . . .Columbus 0921 

0017 Schueller, Fred. W.. Columbus 1705 

2504 Schueller, Orloff W. .Cincinnati 0169 

0206 Schueller, Ernst Columbus 2167 

1276 Schuler, Wm. C Cincinnati 1 148 

0220 Schultz, B. F West Salem 2162 

1005 Schwartz, John C . . . . Hamilton 0922 

1077 Scwartz, Fred. W . . . . Columbus 1067 

1018 Scoby, C. H Hamilton 1020 

1853 Scofield, L. F Lilly Chapel 0814 

01 13 Scott, A. C Columbus 2147 

2031 Scott, A. W Cincinnati 1895 

1449 Scott, Edward .... Waynesburgh 0752 

Olio Scott, John Hilliards 0686 

2034 Scott, John L Defiance 0194 

1 181 Searl, F. A Painesville 0882 



Seeboha, A. W Pomeroy 

Seeds, S. M. Commercial Point 

Seely, H. B Jerome 

Seltzer, S. T Columbus 

Seltzer, Daniel F Akron 

Serodino, Herman .... Cincinnati 

Seufert, John Cleveland 

Seufert, Max J Cincinnati 

Seward, J. A Perryton 

Seward, J. F Perryton 

Sexauer, F. £ . . Sulphur Springs 

Seybert, R. L Hillsboro 

Shafer, CM Canal Fulton 

Shallcross, J. H Gallipolis 

Shanafelt, Fred. M . . Greentown 

Sharp, A. J Ada 

Sharp, D. W Woodstock 

Sharp, John Ada 

Sharp, W. T. Cadiz 

Sharpless, P. O Marion 

Shaw, E. S ..Windham 

Shaw, Frank K Cardington 

Shaw, George Danville 

Shaw, James, S Cardington 

Shay, Marshal L. Cleveland 

Sheekley, C. W Cleveland 

Shelden, Frank D Burton 

Shepared, J. S Nelsonville 

Shepler, E Cambridge 

Sherwood, D. W Cleveland 

Sherwood, L. W. . . . . Columbus 
Shields, W. R . . Newcomerstown 

Shipley, R. S Burgoon 

Shriver, S. C. C Shawnee 

Shuey, Lewis L Fairfield 

Shuesler, John J Leveland 

Sid well. G E Russellville 

Siegenthaler, H. N . . Springfield 

Sillik, M Vanlue 

Simmons, A. H Conneaut 

Simons, A. L Kirkersville 

Simmons, H. H . . . . Kirkersville 

Simons, B.F West MilJgrove 

Simons, Chas. P Caldwell 

Simons, H. G Macksburg 

Simons, H. W Conneaut 

Sinclair, A. H Beallsville 

Sisson, G. W McArthur 

Skeggs, C. W. . . ..Green Spring 
■ Skellenger, A. D. . . New London 

Slack, A. V Graysville 

Slack, Fred. M Cleveland 

Slater, J. W , Ironton 

Slocum, £. L Lancaster 

Slosson, F. W Cleveland 



1 84 



0^0 STATE PBARMACXXrtlCAL ASSOCUTION. 



1622 
1236 

15(55 
0668 

1393 
1444 

1443 
1382 
1604 

0653 
0560 
0260 
1512 

1398 

0331 
0014 

1339 
I180 

t399 
0420 

1264 

1400 

1416 

0065 

006^ 

1938 
1478 
1361 
2187 
0092 
2527 
1818 

1764 
1920 
0021 
0802 
0596 
2043 
0372 

0505 
0416 

0790 

0793 
0648 
0167 
2095 
1427 
0249 
0205 
0270 
0269 
0805 
0268 
1 166 
0876 



Smith, A. F Arcanum 2526 

Smith, Carl W Newton Falls 0097 

Smith, Chas. P . . , ^ . . . . Creston 0098 

Smith, C. W CoUinwood 0928 

Smith, Edward A Warren 0508 

Smith, E. D. F. . West Richfield 0412 

Smith, E. T Richfield 1857 

Smith, F Cheshire 1290 

Smith, Geo. W Cincinnati 0334 

Smith, Jerome Mt. Blanchard 0345 

Smith, J. D Gann 1502 

Smith, Joseph Austintown 0267 

Smith, J. B Chester 0266 

Smith, Kirby Hillsboro 0531 

Smith, L. W Byesville 1313 

Smith, R. W Alexandria 0501 

Smith, T. Ed Cincinnati 1261 

Smith, W. F Painesville 145 1 

Smith, W. G Hillsboro 1840 

Smith, W. H Howard 1567 

Smith, Wm. M Coshocton 1480 

Smith, W. R Hillsboro 0044 

Smith, W. T Springfield 1590 

Sinithnight, Albert. . . .Cleveland 0399 

Smithnight, Louis.. . .Cleveland 1675 

Snear, F. A Stryker 1615 

Snyder, W. A Evansport 2521 

Suodgrass, W. W. ..... . Kenton 1319 

Snow, A. G Negly 1314 

Snyder, A. L Bryan 0629 

Snyder, D. J Scio 2192 

Snyder, G.N La Grange 0849 

Snyder, H. H London 1663 

Snyder, J. S Macksburg 0146 

Sollmann, L i .Canton 0374 

Somers, G. Horace Akron 1289 

Sords, Thos. V Cleveland 1620 

Spamer, Hugo Cincinnati 1337 

Spangenbei^, E Cincinnati 1338 

Spangler, C^ Burbank 1 569 

Spaulding, C. D. Gallon 0175 

Spayd, C. E Toledo 1249 

Spayd, H. W Toledo 1425 

Sprague, J. Arthur Toledo 1726 

Sprague, L. C Pemberville 1977 

Speker, P. W Botkins 1 125 

Spencer, C. A. Crestline 2080 

Spencer, Henry. . New Straitsviile 1378 

Spengler, J. G Dayton 0673 

Spenzer, John Geo. . . . Cleveland 1240 

Spenzer, M. H Cleveland 1825 

Spiker, C. A Tippecanoe 1763 

Spenzer. P. X Cleveland 0608 

Spieth, Wm. F Cleveland 1703 

Spitler, Samuel Brookville 0424 



Spohn, Robt. C Toledo 

Sproat, Frank Chillicothe 

Sproat, James Chillicothe 

Spry, Daniel R Portsmouth 

Squire, D. N Ashville 

Stableton, D. J Manchester 

Stahl, John V Greenfotd 

Stammel, Chas. A. . . .Cincinnati 

Stammel, £. W Cincinnati 

Stansbury, W. E. . . .Middleport 

Stanley, A. D Lowell 

Starbird, B. F. . . .New London 

Starbird, C New London 

Star, N. U Delaware 

Strasbttrg, Fred Cincinnati 

Stausmjrer, C Fremont 

Stecker, Henry W. . . .Cleveland 

Steele, C. H Steiibenville 

Steele, E. M Stenbenville 

Steele, W. C New Berlin 

Steele, W. W Chillicothe 

Steely, E. A Anna 

Steese, C. W Lake 

Steever, H. C Cincinnati 

Stein, F. L Norwalk 

Steinbacher, E Akron 

Steinbrueck, Otto Toledo 

Steineck, H. G Cincinnati 

Steineck, Joseph F.. . .Cincinnati 
Steinhoff, Adolph. . Fort Jennings 

Steinhoff, W. S Columbus 

Steinkamp, J. G .Elmore 

Stem, D. W Savannah 

Stemen, S. A Elida 

Stenger, Edward Cincinnati 

Stephan, August Cincinnati 

Stephens, J. C Ashland 

Sterling, S. L Carrol ton 

Sterling, M. C Carrolton 

Sterrett, John A Troy 

Stevens, John Johnstown 

Stevenson, L. K. . . .West Unity 

Stevic, T. M Shiloh 

Stewart, A. H Brookfield 

Stewart, Chas Ashville 

Stewart, J. E Brookfield 

Stewart, Geo. E . . Cadwallader 

Stewart, H. W Stenbenville 

Stewart, J. K. Auburn 

Stewart, R. F. . . .fiast Liverpool 

St. John, I. L Tiffin 

Stockham, A. H Madison 

Stierle, J. G Versailles 

Stilson, S. B« Gibsonbarg 

Stitt, J. Y Bloomingburgh 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



185 



1268 Stockman, H. S. .. .Loudon ville 

1454 Stockman, H. T.. ..Loud on ville 

1889 Stockon, M Carrollton 

0734 Stockwell, E Quincy 

0439 Stokes, C. C.West Middleburg 

0109 Stone, L. B Belpre 

0820 Stoskopff, George.... Cleveland 

1900 Stover, H. F Dayton 

2060 Stover, I. S Dayton 

097 1 Strawser, D. S Adelphi 

1756 Strayer, D. W De Graff 

0387 Strickland, Dwight Niles 

0148 Strong, Finney Wilkesville 

0572 Strong, R. B Jamestown 

1000 Stroedter. Ernst Columbus 

0069 Strock, E. E Cleveland 

1 598 Strome, J.J Millersburg 

1478 Stubbs, N. B. Stryker 

1954 Stuckenholt, W. H.. Cleveland 

0393 Stumm, R. C ...Wilmington 

2 1 54 Sturgeon, G. W . . N . Georgetown 

0767 Sturgis, J. R Dalton 

1892 St utz, Frank A . . Upper Sandusky 

1528 Styer, Wm. H Marietta 

0027 SuUiger, Wm. R. H.... Forrest 

2020 Sutterfield, C. W. .West Union 

2501 Sulzbacher, Wm. F. .Chillicothe 

0325 Swan, C. D Orville 

1610 Swan, Wm. S South Toledo 

1611 Swan, Mrs. Wm.S.. South Toledo 

0635 Swayer, J. W '. , Cleveland 

0318 Swift, Chas. E. .... .Ashtabula 

0526 Swift, R. B Kingsville 

1007 Swingle, Jas. L Mt. Gilead 

1 197 Sykes, Otis. . . .Chicago Junction 

0061 Taggart, P. S .. New Lexington 

121 1 TaUance, Wm. T. A. . .Syracuse 

1636 Taylor, A. J South Toledo 

0057 Taylor, C. C Perrysburg 

0256 Taylor, Edwin .... Cool ville 

2500 Taylor, F. S Wilmington 

1641 Taylor, H. B Bryan 

1861 Taylor, J. B Ai 

Q564 Taylor, J. D Rose ville 

0164 Taylor, J. P Mechanicsburg 

025 5 Taylor, M. E Coolville 

1655 Taylor, U. B. ...!.., . Maumee 

1 138 Taylor, Wm West Mecca 

1230 Taylor, W. S Bryan 

0541 Taylor, Z. R....West Jefferson 

1483 Terrell, Elliott. , North Ridgeville 

0212 Thayer, L. H Youngstown 

01 1 7 Thomas, C. A .../... . Rush ville 

0130 Thomas, C. G Delaware 

0126 Thomas, E. Stanley. . .Fremont 



1076 Thomen, A. A Columbus 

1687 Thompson, A. M.Columbus Grove 

1260 Thompson, H. W Sidney 

0295 Thompson, R. A Kent 

0434 Thorp, Abner Cincinnati 

1769 Thorp, J. B Midland City 

0966 Thuma, J. W Shaucks 

2506 Thurston, Azor. . . .Grand Rapids 

0613 Thyme, Henry Uhrichsville 

0574 Tielke, Gustav Cleveland 

0884 Tielke, Henry Cleveland 

0158 Tiffany, H. B Clyde 

0686 Tilly, Wm Cincinnati 

1929 Timmermann, J. D Leipsic 

2129 Tipson, T. C Williamsport 

1542 Titsworth, R. L Mt. Victory 

0463 Tobey, Chas. W Troy 

1627 Tobey, Nathaniel Troy 

2071 Todd, H. F Montgomery 

0341 Todd, James F Columbiana 

1942 Tompkins, J. S Avon'^ale 

1 1 28 Town, Robt. M Bethel 

0226 Townsend, P. A Windsor 

0932 Trader, A. J Denni«on 

1048 Treece, Gilbert Vanlue 

0593 Trembley, J. S . . .Frazeysburg 

0594 Trembley, Thos. G . . Frazeysburg 

1919 Triem, Theo Portage 

0152 Trimble, Frank F Salem 

0872 Trimble, O. T Urbana 

01 5 1 Trimble, Robt. P Salem 

1 253 Trisler, L. W Highland 

1 550 Troupe, Theo Springfield 

1257 Troyer, Levi D Shanesville 

1933 Truesdale, Wm. F Jasper 

1453 Tschanen, G. W.. Upper Sandusky 

1 452 Tschanen, W. T. . Upper Sandusky 

0815 Tucker, J. C Green Spring 

1650 Tulloss, B. L Akron 

1029 Tupa, F. J Cleveland 

1737 Turner, Mrs. J. H Shreve 

1896 Turner, R. K .. Rush ville 

1529 Turney, L. M Holgate 

1510 Tuttle, F, A Jefferson 

0571 Tyson, L. B Kenton 

1 5 16 Ullman, W. P Loudonville 

1930 Umbenhaur, H. C Hicksville 

1 517 Uncapher, D. K Salem 

1 108 Underwood, J. W. Bowling Green 

0553 Urban, J. P Cleveland 

2565 Urban, Theo Cleveland 

1522 Uthofif, J. H. H Genoa 

0231 Utley, Judson Galena 

1 1 1 1 Valentine, R. H . . . . Belle Center 

0075 Vance, E. P Westerville 



i86 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



112 Vaughn, Frank. Osborn 2007 

0768 Van Gorder, C. M Warren 1380 

1788 Van Gorder, H. L Warren 0567 

1343 Van Law, J. D Bellaire 0140 

1885 Van Stone, Thos Toledo 2186 

1946 Van Valkenburg, A. T.. Spencer 1075 

1673 Van Voorhis, J. E.. .Martinsbarg 1277 

1926 Vance, C ... Shane's Crossing 0821 

0091 Vetter, A. C Sardis 0314 

2029 Vieth, Wm Cincinnati 1 106 

1304 Vilter, Herman Cincinnati 0326 

0312 Virden, M. H La Rue ' 1021 

1904 Vocke, J. F....Loramie P. O. 04^8 

1059 Vogel, A. A Columbus 0584 

0038 Vogt, A. L Delaware 2140 

1432 Vogt, D. F Cleveland 1800 

1074 Voigt, F. H Holgate 1 185 

2081 Volka, C La&yette 0081 

0082 Vollnogle, P. F. .New Waterford 1630 

1538 Von Muralt, R TiltonsviUe 1629 

1039 Von Stein, J. X . . Upper Sandusky 1 269 

1292 Vortkamp, H. F Milford 0010 

1291 Voss, Geo. W Cincinnati 1317 

0040 Wagner, C. W Mans6eld 1057 

0692 Wagner, E Zaieski 0122 

1 31 5 Wagner, Henry Cincinnati 1227 

1296 Wagner, John C Cincinnati 1459 

0043 Wahmhoff, John H....Delphos 0400 

0789 Walborn, Frank L..Miamisburg 2133 

0004 Walker, J. 6. . . .Williamsbuigh 2531 

1 37 1 Walker, J. B. Seville 2019 

0012 Walker, W. P. .Washingtonville 0962 

1224 Walker, W. W.... Wilmington 0335 

0221 Walker, W. R Batavia 2550 

1876 Wall, Andrew Cambridge 0677 

1015 Wall, C, L Cambridge 1305 

1440 Wallace, A. C Bellefontaine 0647 

0184 Walt, E. C Marion 0585 

0623 Walton, Harry C . .Cincinnati 1294 

3561 Ware, J. M.... North Lewisburg 0086 

0926 Warfield, James F Ironton 1 165 

1272 Warner, Auf^ustus Akron 1085 

0736 Warner, A. C Tiffin 0030 

1843 Warren, J. B Mt. Vernon 0025 

1003 Waterman, H Ravenna 0612 

2004 Waterman, Homer CZanesville 0509 

1273 Watkins, S. S Columbus 0795 

0827 Warwick, John B. . ..Lucasville 2558 

0313 Watts, C. D Broadway 0559 

1856 Weaiherbee, J. A Nashville 2055 

1 1 20 Weatherhead, R. H.. Cincinnati 0223 

0303 Weaver, A Greenville 0590 

0601 Weaver, J. A Montpelier 1 893 

0302 Weaver, J. G Greenville 1894 

1586 Weaver, D. S Appleton 1439 



Webb, M. W Springfield 

Webber, T. J Plymoath 

Webber, Chas. L Canton 

Webster, D. E Lowellville 

Webfter, J. V Flnsbiiig 

Weed, T. R Cheshire 

Weeks, B. F Cincinnati 

Weeks, G. W Belmore 

Weiler, J. J Cleveland 

Weirich, Israel .... Martins Ferry 

Weis, Chas. F Dayton 

Weis, Henry F Dayion 

y^ eis. H. L Dayton 

Wei&brodt, Gus.... Middletown 
Weisner, A. H. . . .Berlin Center 

Weiler, A DeGraff 

Weiler, F. B Jackson Center 

Weiler, W. A Zanesvillc 

Wellons, J. W Bamesville 

Wellons, S. G Bamesville 

Wells, H. C WelbviUe 

Wells, H. E Bridgeport 

Wells, J. D Cincinnati 

Wells, W. P Zanesville 

Wells, W. P. .New Philadelphia 
Wenning, Gus. H. ...Cincinnati 

Werner, John J Stoutsville 

Werner, W. M Painesville 

Wertr, W. H. H Dalton 

West, C Toledo 

West, Fairfax Lees Creek 

Wes», J. E St, Clairsville 

West, W. K Toledo 

West, W. L. . . .New Matamoras 

West, Brook A. E Ashley 

Wetterstroem, Albert . . Cincinnati 

Wetzel, Geo. H Lancaster 

Weusthoff, Otto S Dayton 

Weyer, John Cincinnati 

Wheeler, A. F Lima 

Whedom, John Hudson 

White, A. J Mansfield 

White, E. B Lancaster 

White, J. B Bellaire 

White, J. W Uhrichsville 

White, T. R Trimble 

White. W. E Middlepoint 

Whitehead, R. W. .Youngstown 

Whitmer, R. T Thomville 

Whittaker, John Camden 

WickoflF, H. G. . . .Chagrin Falls 

Widney, H. M Zanesville 

Wiest, Chas. E Conneaut 

Wiest, S. G Ashland 

Wilcox, H. L Cleveland 



OHIO STATS PHABUACSOTIOAL ASSOCIATION 



187 



0976 WiWcnthaler, G. A... Sandusky 0727 

1490 Wiifert, Ernst Cincinnati 1849 

2547 Wilkenson. E. L Van Wert 1625 

0804 Wilkens, D. F. . . .Locust Grove 1848 

0956 WitUmen, E. P Smithvilte 1072 

0133 Williams, £. R Nevada 0744 

1 947 Williams, CM Wellston 0743 

0482 Williams, R. G Alliance 2143 

0663 Wilson, Albert Sidney 0383 

0998 Wilson, A. C Piqua 1293 

0925 Wilson, D. C Ironton 0160 

0277 Wilson, H. C Wellston 0039 

1 723 Wilson, Israd Cincinnati .1 798 

0605 Wilson, T. G Barnesville 1985 

0625 Wilson, W. A Wooster 19 16 

0625 Wilson, Wm, Lexington 1531 

1218 Wilson, W. C Claikson 0009 

1219 Winbigler, J. M . . . . Jeromeville 1564 
0435 Winkleman, G. H. . . .Cincinnati 1939 
0737 Winkler, W. H.. Apple Creek 1201 

0469 Winters, Aaron Ironton 2073 

0952 Wisterman, I. ..Shanes Crossing 0405 

0380 Witherstine, H. A Nova 1436 

1559 Witte, L. H Cleveland 0561 

2018 Wittenbrook, C. H. . . .Masterton 2045 

1295 Wittstein, Chas Cincinnati 0729 

0936 Witzeman, A. J Leetonia 2155 

2051 Wocher, Chas. F Cincinnati 2553 

1297 Woesten, A. F Cincinnati 1092 

0442 Wohlgemuth, A Cincinnati 2083 

1103 Wolf,C. P Wilmot 2062 

1 59 1 Wolf, Simon Fremont 1 259 

1 102 Wolf, Samuel Wilmot 0566 

1742 Wolf, S. S Adelphi 0385 

1914 Wood, Fred Peninsula 1 121 

2 141 Wood, I. V Chesterville 0033 

0783 Woods, W. J Mt. Sterling 0034 

1606 Woodrow, W. C Hillsboro 



Woodward, Nelson G.. Defiance 

Wooster, N. P Elyria 

Wooster, A. R Wellington 

Wooster, W. F Elyria 

Wooster, T. S Norwalk 

Worley, Geo Covington 

Worley, T. A Covington 

Worthington, A. F Cincinnati 

Worthington, CD Killbuck 

Wrede, Henry Cincinnati 

Wight, F. G Defiance 

Wright, Henry Belmont 

Wright, J. M. ., . . .Gillespieville 

Wright, J. M Steuben 

Wright, J. N Raymonds 

Wright, L. E Pickerington 

Wright, W. C Cleveland 

Wright, S. V Lyndon 

Wyatt, B Edgerton 

Wvrick, C. M Bellaire 

Yant, Isaac Dell Roy 

Yarnell, Geo. M Senecaville 

Yeogley, W. C . . .New Somerset 

Yerian, Fred Sharon 

Yorston, Matthew M .. Cincinnati 

Young, Anderson, J Leipsic 

Young, J. H Somerville 

Young, L. A Toledo 

Zartman, D Butler P. O. 

Zay, George Celina 

Zeller, Abia Dayton 

Zickes, Otto Cleveland 

Zimmerman, John Wooster 

Zimmerman, J. R Wooster 

Zuenkeler, J. Ferd, . . .Cincinnati 
Zwerner, J. Adam. .. .Columbus 
Zwemer, J. F Marysville 



1 88 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL A880CIATIOJ9. 



REGISTERED ASSISTANT PHARMACISTS. 



057 Ackeret, Theo. C Massillon 063 

059 Ackley, J. W Granville 098 

028 Adams, Geo. M Oxford 081 

112 Aigin, S. C Delaware 178 

149 Akeroyd, Geo. T Dresden 611 

388 Alexander, E. V . . McConnellsville 605 

134 Allen, B. F Belletontaine 071 

282 Allen, Chas. L Cleveland 0157 

391 Allison, E. H Eaton 333 

232 Allright, B. F Bryan 394 

457 Altenberger, P J., Upper Sandusky 313 
276 Aidann, C. E Portsmouth 354 

060 Amann, Frank O Sidney 143 

146 Andrews, Lucy T Cortland 385 

055 Armbruster, G. E Logan 129 

272 Arnold, H, E. Cambridge 066 

304 Ashton, Ruth A Lima 208 

377 Austin, Lulu Plymouth 207 

603 Baker, W. H Shanesville 400 

459 Bailie, Chas. S Cleveland 032 

279 Bailey, Mrs. M East Toledo 446 

147 Bair, J. G Freeport 216 

455 Baird, W. E East Springfield 360 

416 Barnum, J. R Stryker 312 

358 Barr, W. B Steubenville 180 

114 Barrett, W. R ...Shawnee 015 

289 Barry, George Canton cx)4 

200 Bartholow, J. W Newark- 221 

292 Bartlett, Estella Cleveland 602 

036 Bartley, F. A Harrisonville 410 

119 Barton, David A Gallipolis 615 

247 Battles, W. P Ashtabula 120 

•233 Baumhard, C. C Vermillion 267 

166 Beckwith, James Z Malta 328 

432 Bell, Robert M Cincinnati 022 

290 Bentley, S. O Newark 356 

458 Billhardt, A. , Jr . . Upper Sandusky 068 

.... Bishop, Will A Norwalk 237 

123 Black, F. W Cleveland 464 

422 Blackmore, Geo Painesville 1 54 

160 Blake, Chas. E Canton 126 

295 Bleckner, Charles. . . .Oak Harbor 01 1 

438 Bliler, Milton Canal Fulton 125 

460 Boessler , .. Cincinnati 1 75 

395 Borer, Henry J Wapakoneta 188 

067 Bourgeois, Chas Canton 107 

191 Bowersock, C. H Columbus 048 

o79 Boyd, S. H Wooster 109 

266 Boyer, Henry . . Columbus Grove 287 

461 Brady, Frank S Cleveland 291 



Brandel, John J Portsmouth 

Breaden, William . . .Youngstown 

Brenner, Chas. E Lima 

Brister, J. S I Canal Dover 

Brooks, Fred. A Cleveland 

Buescher, Fred. W Alliance 

Burdsal, Edward H . . . . Cincinnati 

Burrows, A Wtst Jefferson 

Burt, T. D Columbus 

Byaitl, Grant Warren 

Cahoe, C. A Toledo 

Caldwell, E. B Mansfield 

Carpenter, Anna Delhi 

Carr, Bert. E Liverpool 

Carter, E. L Bryan 

Case, W. H Kent 

Cassaday, F. V Alliance 

Cassaday, O. U . Alliance 

Chambers, G. A. . . Mt. Pleasant 
Chambers, Sam. V . . . . Marion 

Chapman, G. H Zanesville 

Charles, Xenophon F . . . . Republic 
Chestnut, Chas. S . . . . Chillicothe 

Clark, Ulyssis E Xenia 

Clewers, W. F Jackson 

Clobitz, Edward Cleveland 

Coblentz, Guy Springfield 

Cockerill, William Cleveland 

Collins, E. A .Wauseon 

Colwell, Frank F Urbana 

Conner, A. W Cambridge 

Conrad, F. W Toledo 

Cook, E. A Chardon 

Cook, E. S Columbus 

Corwin, B. B Sparta 

Cowden, J. W Poland 

Crabbe, H. J Greenville 

Crane, Amelia B . . . . Greensburgh 

Crane, Delia V. B Iberia 

Crawford, J. W Richwood 

Crossland, J. D. . . .St. Clairsville 

Crowther, C. I Conneant 

Crumbaker,0. H.P..Chandlersvillc 

Culler, F. W Cleveland 

Curry, W. J East Liverpool 

Darrah, Ida G Bellaire 

Davis, Jesse , . . . Jeffersonville 

Davis, L. M Cleveland 

Davis, Williard H Lowell 

Davis, W. H. C Hillsboro 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



189 



117 Dean, J. W. Columbus 

039 Deemer, Chas. H . . . . New Lisbon 

141 DeRhodes, Frank Salem 

159 Dischinger, Fred A Toledo 

428 Dodd, Mrs. Mattie J.. Dell Roy 

262 Doll, Tonie C St. Mary's 

056 Donnan, £. V. .Washington C.H. 

306 Doran, Isaac A . . . . Rusfosylvania 

307 Dubois, C. J Dayton 

220 Dull, L. E Forest 

268 Duplor, W Glouster 

loi Eichler, W . .Cincinnati 

430 Ellis, T. B Washington C. H. 

320 Elwell, W. M Zanesville 

031 Elwood, Harry S Leesburgh 

185 Enslin, Abert F Cincinnati 

121 Epley, Chas. ... Canal Winchester 

044 Ernst, John... . Mechanicsburg 

343 Fee, Wm. J., Jr. Cincinnati 

... Fella, F.J Toledo 

361 Ferguson, Frank Defiance 

164 Fielder, Geo. W St. Paris 

225 Fisher, H. W Hamilton 

078 Fitch, E. O Burgh Hill 

042 Flanders, John W Portsmouth 

234 Foerst, Wm. J Cincinnati 

454 Foertmeyer, Wm. L ..Cincinnati 

171 Fogle, B. J. Toronto 

466 Fogle, M. S Cleveland 

227 Ford, F. E Middlefield 

412 Ford, L. A Wakeman 

153 Fortlage, J. H Cleveland 

155 Foster, James. .Cleveland 

. . . Frederick, C. H . . North Amherst 

352 Frederick, J. M Akron 

204 Frew, Edward S Coshocton 

165 Fribley, Jacob T Navaree 

337 Friedland, Mrs. S. A. . . .Coalton 

607 Frieseman, William H . . Cleveland 

463 Fulling, E, G Cleveland 

140 Fulton, D. W Sidney 

219 Fulton, Norberto D . . , . . . Ripley 

128 Gackenheimer, M. U.. Van Wert 

398 Gager, D. A Oberlin 

017 Galbrath, C. W Manchester 

363 Garlington, W. D . . . . Cumberland 

183 Garratt, Eva M Adamsville 

444 Garver, Rudy Strasburgh 

052 Goddard, B. F Findlay 

026 Goebel, Chas. W Springfield 

339 Gonvy, C. Howard Cleveland 

249 Gurman, Alice M Cincinnati 

244 Graham, John A Avondale 

382 Grayum, Chas. W Gallipolis 

261 Green, J. B Plymouth 



445 Griffin, James P . . Springborough 

606 Grosse, G. M Cleveland 

452 Guiney, Ella E. . . .Waynesburgh 

431 Gunder, W. H Arcanum 

216 Hager, James A Portsmouth 

151 Hague, E. U Elyria 

189 Hair, Conrad tne J ..... .Alliance 

612 Hale, Pierre J Belpre 

065 Hamilton, Harry A . . Perrysburgh 

046 Hamilton. W. O Wellsville 

281 Hannah, Henry K. .. Georgetown 

184 Hannan, J. R Ironton 

376 Harrison, M. T Paulding 

309 Harter, Chas. B Steubenville 

434 Hathaway, C. W Painesville 

007 Hauck, A. C . . . . Columbus Grove 

161 Hauser, William Sandusky 

082 Hawley, E. B Arcanum 

420 Hays, Fred. Fostoria 

115 Headley, J. W Marion 

359 Hearson, Frank E. . . . Monroeville 

037 Heing, Wm. H Toledo 

283 Hellyer, S. B Steubenville . 

094 Henkelman, Heniy K.. Sandusky 

235 Hildreth, Mary A Cheviot 

334 Hines, C. E Van Wert 

013 Hines, J. B Van Wert 

614 Herpich, John L Columbus 

209 Huberman, W. H Marion 

437 Hochstetler, J. C . . . . Doylestown 

224 Holderman, W. S Amanda 

102 Hoffman, Julius Cincinnati 

093 Hoffiier, Frank J Oberlin 

254 HoUinger, T. H. . ; . . . Columbus 

390 Hoover, L Gratis P. O. 

148 Huppy, Henry Piqua 

344 Horn, Wm Zanesville 

012 Hornung, Richard M.... Dresden 

393 Hosier, J. N Shaucks 

198 Hosier, L. Roy Shaucks 

531 Hosmer, Angus Findlay 

322 Hoyt, H. W Norwalk 

030 Hubbard, ■ Lyle Medina 

096 Hull, L, M Nelsonville 

471 Huls, J. W Rockbridge 

238 Hunt, T. J Wilmington 

286 Hutchings, J. Harvey Bellevue 

374 Hutchins, John Roscoe 

3 1 7 Hutchman, W. M Marietta 

325 Ingalls, N. R La Grange 

242 Jay, Myron Ravenna 

127 Jenkins, Wm Dayton 

305 Jewett, George D Cleveland 

228 Johnson, Albert Painesville 

070 Johnson, J. D Canton 



ipo 



OHIO STATE PBARMACEUTJCAL ASSOCUTION. 



600 Johnson, W. H Urbana 

213 Johnson, Vara I Grafton 

357 Justice, D. W. Poland 

450 Karsch, Geo. V Cincinnati 

118 Katz, Otto W Gallion 

231 Kehres, £d. J Cleveland 

002 Keiser, N. H Delta 

439 Kellogg, Edwin £.... Cincinnati 

274 KelU, Hairy B Steubenville 

449 Kendall, A. L Fayette 

049 Kern, J. E Bucyrus 

413 Kerr, John Shelby 

108 Kester, J. G Woosttr 

421 Kilboume, H. A Canton 

045 King, Kate R Canfield 

408 King, Mrs. M. L Arlington 

197 Kiussman, Maggie Elliston 

085 Knouff, W. L Antrim 

246 Knowles, Geo. S Felicity 

100 Koenig, F. H Cincinnati 

373 Kauss, Herman J Tiffin 

144 Krieger, Otto Cincinnati 

090 Krimmell, W. L Circleville 

462 Krower, C. T Wyoming 

372 Kumler, S. D London 

35 1 Kusnick, L Riverside 

131 Lamb, L. N Cincinnati 

303 Lam carter, John Akron 

346 Leacn, Sherman. .. .Mt. Sterling 

426 Leas, R. W West Sonora 

442 Lefever, E. J Eldorado 

192 Leist, Isaiah, Jr Napoleon 

018 Leitzell, A. D Seville 

288 Leonard, L. C Dayton 

162 Leonard, N. S Kinsman 

270 Lewis, Thos. C Jackson 

170 L^gett, N. E Marysville 

389 Linser, Geo. J Bac3nus 

003 Lindsey, W. B Canton 

010 Long, Lee Richwood 

075 Long, Uri Bryan 

427 Lautzenheiser, M..New Phila'phia 

033 Lucas, Chas. C Kipton 

172 Luce, James D Urbana 

041 Lupton, W. O Delaware 

083 Lush, M. Agnes Loudonville 

1 67 Luthringer, J os. L. . East Liverpool 

296 Lutzenl^rger, Chas Dayton 

243 Lyon, Walter P Ravenna 

252 Maiberger, N Elyria 

43^ Maitland, Jchn K Bedford 

058 Mandabach, P. A Columbus 

332 Martin, George W Dayton 

009 Martin, William Cincinnati 

214 Martin, Wm., Jr. Mansfield 



201 Meily, Geo. W Mans6eld 

338 Mengtier, George Cincinnati 

124 Mentel, E. H Dayton 

139 Metz, Chas. L Yonngstown 

259 Miller, £. C Canton 

275 Mitchell, Geo. F Columbus 

610 Mitchell, Geo. J Cleveland 

347 Monroe, C. A Logan 

113 Mooney, H. S Curdington 

379 Mpore, R. O Leesville 

212 Morgan, Annt- tie ... . Clarksburgh 

181 Mariland, D. G Edgerton 

215 Moser, E. A Wapakoneta 

176 Moser, L F Lima 

132 Moses, C . W Georgetown 

230 Munch, J. A Toledo 

443 Murphy, Chas. W . . . . Wilmington 

072 Murphy, M. J Cincinnati 

336 Murray, S. W . . Washington C. H. 

035 Murray, Thomas .' Plain City 

409 Myers, Chas. G Lima 

203 McClain, Lewis Lctart Falls 

366 McCanau^hey, J. H DeGraflf 

448 McCormick, J. K. . . . Youngstown 

324 McCoy, R. L. Piqua 

401 McCoy, W. J . . Bloomingburg 
136 McCracken, ]. M. ..Belief on taine 

014 McCreight, D. H Ottawa 

122 McDowell, C. O Medina 

402 McFadden, Chas. L. . . . Van Wert 
084 McKee, H. Wilson Athens 

348 McKinley, L. P Uhrichsville 

329 McLaughlin, J. D Butler 

156 McMillen, C. S Mt. Sterling 

330 McMillen, Florence. . ..Greenwich 

340 McNichols, W Barnesville 

327 Neal, J Waynesville 

163 NefF, J. Grant New Carlisle 

. . . Nelson, Geo. W Springfield 

316 Neuer, John Jacob Marietta 

451 Newberger, Myer Cincinnati 

023 Nichols, Julia A Columbus 

314 Nickerson, Alice J. . . .Greenwich 

401 Noel. C. H Van Wert 

349 Norris, T. W Mt. Gilead 

087 Norwood, J. N Cincinnati 

061 OdafTer, David M Bucyrus 

285 Odell, John L Delta 

323 Oestermeyer, John Zanesville 

318 Ohl, Sarah J Mineral Ridge 

177 Packard, Hannah. . Chatham Center 

150 Park, C. W Elyria 

609 Parkin, R. J . . . . Newburg Station 

355 Parish, Alice Hamilton 

217 Pettys, H. R Republic 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



191 



016 Peyton, F. R Manchester 

223 Pfanner, John A Dayton 

025 Pflueger, C, F Gary 

367 Pheneger, H. A Columbus 

038 Philips, Jemima S.. North Jackson 

182 Poole, Ira A Fayette 

193 Potter, £. L Sherwood 

399 Prass, John N Dayton 

001 Pratt, E. M Delta 

019 Pray, C. S White House 

415 Rabe, E. M Clyde 

1 10 Ralston, G Martin's Ferry 

419 Ralston, W. M- Fostoria 

380 Ray, Pliny Perrysburg 

298 Raymer, C. S Coshocton 

138 Rees, Mrs L. J.. South Charleston 

369 Reid, J. C Cuyahoga FaUs 

054 Remple, Rudolph Logan 

297 Richards, £. H Litchfield 

310 Richards, Ed. T Marietta 

111 Richey, R. £ New Paris 

418 Ritzenthaler, P Kiptun 

027 Robb, Clara E Cincinnati 

095 Roberts, Chas. F. . . . . .Columbus 

229 Robinson, J.S . . Washington C. H. 

415 Robinson, L. M Sabina 

384 Robinson, Wm. L Gallipolis 

406 Rockey, Adolph Chatfield 

405 Rockey, David Chatfield 

381 Rogers, Geo Bowling Green 

064 Roll, R. G New Holland 

353 Roth, Louis Cleveland 

258 Rotterman, Chas. E Dayton 

091 Rowe, C. P Circleville 

186 Ruch, C. E Salem 

447 Rucker, B. J Rich wood 

076 Russ, A. E Shiloh 

470 Rusk, Wm. A Malta 

202 Russell, Lance M McArthur 

368 Ryan, Thos. J Columbus 

299 Rynard, Mary A Kent 

222 Ssq;er, James Marysvilie 

424 Sanders, E. C Metamora 

467 Sanford, H. S Lima 

468 Sanford, S., Jr Lima 

440 Saunders, E. G Cleveland 

073 Saviers, George Plymouth 

211 Sawyer, Chas. H .. Mineral Point 

608 Saxby, E. A Weston 

469 Seals, C. B Cleveland 

187 Schantz, Jas. J. ...'.. . .Cleveland 

248 Schilling, Mary C Louisville 

236 Schmetzler, Emil U Archbold 

069 Schoerger, Geo Port Clinton 

145 Schuette, J. R Columbus 



383 Schroder, John A .Dayton 

387 Scott, Addie M.. ..Waynesbnrgh 

321 Scott, Mary A. .. .Waynesburgh 

210 Scott, Winfield Seneca ville 

403 Seebohn, Chas. C Pomeroy 

Seward, J. E Fremont 

169 Sharpe, John A Akron 

021 Sharp, R. D William»-burg 

133 Shaw, Alma, Cardington 

319 Sheets, M. L Dayton 

105 Shephard, M. Q Nolsonville 

190 Shepherd, Chas. H Arcanum 

250 Shepherd, Enos H. ...Hillsboro 

362 Shoemaker, W DeGraff 

341 Showalter, D. W Springfield 

092 Shotwell, W. D Cincinnati 

173 Shull, H. F Lima 

300 Schumway, C, jr. .. .Columbus 

392 Siddall, Eugene £ Findlay 

265 Sight, Henry F. .Columbus Grove 

097 Silberling, J. H Cleveland 

253 Sisson, Harvey McArthur 

277 Smart, C. H Pioneer 

074 Smith, C. F Swanton 

465 Smith, Louis Cincinnati 

196 Smith, Frank L Defiance 

271 Smith, Wm. P Crestline 

158 Sncll, Ira N Toledo 

257 Snodgrass, Carrie M.... Kenton 

371 Snyder, Mary J LaGrange 

240 Southard, F. M. . . .Spencerville 

088 Spamer, Geo. H Cincinnati 

135 Spidel, C. E Wilmot 

086 Stableton, W. W Manchester 

239 Stahl, Hugo Sidney 

378 Staker, G. A Breman 

106 Stamats, W. M Bellefontaine 

308 Stausburg, J. B Urbana 

278 Steele, A. E Chillicothe 

342 Steidle, Chris. F Cincinnati 

302 Steinbacher, E. E Akron 

006 Sieinman, Perry D Lancaster 

397 Stem, John F Savannah 

255 Stephan, Wm Cincinnati 

245 Stewart, F. C Auburn 

350 Stewart, W. N Brookfield 

423 Stockhaus, Wm. F Cleveland 

241 Stockmon, Chas. B .. Loudon ville 

089 Stover, W. L ; Hayesville 

062 Streich, Philip M Portsmouth 

407 Stringham, A. W Steuben 

104 Strol^l, John B Ironton 

218 Strutton, L..D., Jr Norwalk 

103 Sullivan, E. N Urbana 

441 Sutterfield, D. R West Union 

« 



192 



OHIO STATE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION. 



301 Swan, John ^ South Toledo 

251 Sweney, Geo. W Marion 

256 Swift, Edgar J Ashtabula 

024 Taylor, L. Bennett. . . .Zanesville 

335 Taylor, J. H .. Washington C. H. 

433 Thieman, Albert F Dayton 

199 Thomas, Jas, N Lucasville 

311 Thrall, H. H Xenia 

414 Timmerman, J., Jr Leipsic 

047 Tobler, C. B Thorn ville 

294 Treon, Isaac Lima 

168 Triem, Daniel Portage 

040 Trimble, B. E Salem 

008 Upton, Harley Scott ... Hamilton 

137 Uthe, Chas. A Cleveland 

4 1 ! Vance, Elizath I . . Shane's Crossing 

396 Van JDyke, CM Lebanon 

436 Van Dyke, J. M Mason 

613 Van Ewegen, Wm. J Toledo 

417 Vigus, C. S Xenia 

273 Vogt,J. J Cleveland 

130 Vortkamp, B. H Cincinnati 

284 Vassler, J. C Greenville 

050 Wagerly, Geo Bucyrus 

453 Wagner, Wm. S Cincinnati 

174 Walker, J. F Steubenville 

029 Wallace. J. L. .New Philadelphia 

005 Ward, H. M Lancaster 

429 Warner, W. W Monroe 

053 Weil, John Findlay 

364 Weller, Chas. G DeGraff 

020 Weller, G. M Zanesville 



365 Weller, J. P West Liberty 

152 Weimer, J. E Hoytsville 

1 79 Wenger, F. D Galion 

206 Werner, Chas. J Hazleton 

043 Westfall, A. L Troy 

604 Wheeler, F. K Lima 

269 Wetterstroem, Theo ... Cincinnati 

263 Whinery, W. F Sabina 

601 Whitsit, P. B. ..... . Columbus 

293 Whitcomb, E .... Cleveland 

370 Whiteis,V.R Kalida 

315 Wickham, Agnes B. .. .Nor walk 

. . . Williams, E Newark 

099 Williams, O. G Ravenna 

326 Wisterman, G. J.. Shane's Crossing 

077 Witherstine, Elizabeth Nova 

205 Witschner, Martin Tiffin 

260 Woesten. J. F Cincinrati 

051 Wolfe, J. Chas Springfield 

456 Wooster, Alma F Norwalk 

264 Wray, R. G London 

226 Wright, E. S New London 

280 Yaeger, L Eaton 

194 Yerian, W. D Sharon 

386 Zecher, Louis. Hamilton 

195 Zellers, Joseph A. . . .Steubenville 

375 Ziliox, David Piqua 

080 Zimmerman, Chas Wooster 

034 Zimmerman, L. P Fremont 

142 Zubor, Peter Findlay 

345 Zurborn, Ernest Hamilton